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While browsing Roslyn source code at GitHub, I came across the CSharpSyntaxTree which is a public abstract class with static methods. I have not seen this before and would like to know if this is a new trend.

My first reaction while reading the code for the said class was "Oh OK, this is an interface definition." But then, seeing the following static method was confusing:

    /// <summary>
    /// Produces a syntax tree by parsing the source text.
    /// </summary>
    public static SyntaxTree ParseText(
        SourceText text,
        CSharpParseOptions options = null,
        string path = "",
        CancellationToken cancellationToken = default(CancellationToken))
    {
        if (text == null)
        ...
    }

Also, this SO question and an answer to it indicate that a static method in an abstract class is not good practice. If so, why would relatively modern source code from Microsoft perpetuate such a practice?

My background is in C++, and I feel that C++ is needlessly complex. I don't want to see the same thing happen to C#.

  • Interesting, but "if this is a new trend" is asking for opinions. There is nothing new about the language feature itself. – Henk Holterman Feb 15 at 12:39
  • It is entirely normal. If you'd want a declaration with no implementation at all then you'd use an interface. A feature that C++ needs to emulate. – Hans Passant Feb 15 at 13:26
  • @HansPassant Thank you for taking the time to comment. – Androa Uandju Feb 15 at 16:46
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Is the use of static methods in abstract classes new in C#?

No.

Why would relatively modern source code from Microsoft perpetuate such a practice?

Context is everything. In this case, it's obvious that CSharpSyntaxTree.ParseText is a factory method - it returns a new ParsedSyntaxTree instance (which is a private subclass of CSharpSyntaxTree). This is a perfectly valid use of a static method on an abstract class.

I'd even go further and disagree with the answer you linked. Abstract base classes are often simply for convenience, to reduce code duplication and capture some common behaviour from its subclasses. In this case, putting common static methods on it make sense.

  • 1
    This pattern is also used in the BCL - e.g. the abstract Expression class has a lot of factory methods that produce Expression subtypes. – Charles Mager Feb 15 at 13:04
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It's not new to allow static methods on abstract classes, there's never been any special rule banning them.

I disagree that it's bad practice. If a static method relates to the concept the static method is about, then that's a good place to put it. It often makes sense for factory methods, for example.

My first reaction while reading the code for the said class was "Oh OK, this is an interface definition."

If defining an interface only, without any functionality, it is generally a much better idea to use an interface than an abstract class in C#.

  • Jon, thank you for your answer. – Androa Uandju Feb 15 at 12:48
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No this is not a new Feature. You can see the changes made to C# here
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/whats-new/csharp-version-history

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