10

Appel [App02] very briefly mentions that C (and presumably C++) provide guarantees regarding the locations of actual parameters in contiguous memory as opposed to registers when the address-of operator is applied to one of formal parameters within the function block.

e.g.

void foo(int a, int b, int c, int d)
{
    int* p = &a;
    for(int k = 0; k < 4; k++)
    {
       std::cout << *p << " ";
       p++;
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

and an invocation such as...

foo(1,2,3,4);

will produce the following output "1 2 3 4"

My question is "How does this interact with calling conventions?"

For example __fastcall on GCC will try place the first two arguments in registers and the remainder on the stack. The two requirements are at odds with each other, is there any way to formally reason about what will happen or is it subject to the capricious nature of implementation defined behaviour?

[App02] Modern Compiler Implementation in Java, Andrew w. Appel, Chapter 6, Page 124

Update: I suppose that this question is answered. I think I was wrong to base the whole question on contiguous memory allocation when what I was looking for (and what the reference speaks of) is the apparent mismatch between the need for parameters being in memory due the use of address-of as opposed to in registers due to calling conventions, maybe that is a question for another day.

Someone on the internet is wrong and sometimes that someone is me.

6
  • 4
    Actually that cout expression is not well defined (because you are changing and requesting p in it), so the result might as well be accidental :)
    – filmor
    Mar 29, 2011 at 11:40
  • 1
    @DuncanACoulter Surely, this behaviour is an artefact of the given implementation and is not guaranteed by the C/C++ language standards?
    – NPE
    Mar 29, 2011 at 11:41
  • @DuncanACoulter: one simple way would be to have the compiler diagnose that the calling convention is at odd with the requirement (at the point of definition of the function), since we're talking C / C++ here though... I'd rather not venture on this territory. Mar 29, 2011 at 11:42
  • @filmor I have edited the question to no longer use a single output expression. The fundamental question still remains however. Mar 29, 2011 at 11:45
  • @aix That is indeed a possibility, sometimes it is possible to get an unambiguous interpretation of the rules and that is what I am hoping for here. Mar 29, 2011 at 11:48

4 Answers 4

3

First of all your code doesn't always produce 1, 2, 3, 4. Just check this one: http://ideone.com/ohtt0 Correct code is at least like this:

void foo(int a, int b, int c, int d)
{
    int* p = &a;
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
    {
        std::cout << *p;
        p++;
    }
}

So now let's try with fastcall, here:

void __attribute__((fastcall)) foo(int a, int b, int c, int d)
{
    int* p = &a;
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
    {
        std::cout << *p << " ";
        p++;
    }
}

int main()
{
        foo(1,2,3,4);
}

Result is messy: 1 -1216913420 134514560 134514524

So I really doubt that something can be guaranteed here.

13
  • The move from a single expression to a loop must have been made while you were formatting your reply. Mar 29, 2011 at 11:52
  • 1
    I'll accept implementation level disproof by counter-example as presented here. This seems to be highly implementation specific. Pity there does not seem to be a way to establish how the requirements will interact beforehand without resorting to exploratory testing. Mar 29, 2011 at 12:00
  • @DuncanACoulter I don't think this is a requirement. Many ABIs x64, alpha, itanium etc. pass/passed the first N arguments in registers as a matter of course. The only scenario I can think of where you'd think you'd need it would be varargs but with functionality like register windows you wouldn't necessarily need it there. I suspect either Appel is mistaken, out of date or you misread or misunderstood the statement. Maybe you could get a better answer if you quote what he said. Even if it is true, your code depends on the direction of stack growth and the order in which parameters are pushed. Mar 29, 2011 at 12:16
  • 1
    @Logan Capaldo Updated question to include link to exact quote via Google Books. Mar 29, 2011 at 12:36
  • 1
    @DuncanACoulter The quote from the book you linked does not at all say anything about contiguous memory. It even says "An industrial-strength compiler must assign provisional locations to formals and locals, and decide later which of them should really go in registers", explicitly allowing for some things to be in registers and others not and saying nothing about contiguity. I think you have misunderstood the text here. Mar 29, 2011 at 14:40
1

The C++ standard has no concept of a calling convention. That's left for the compiler to deal with.

In this case, if the standard requires that parameters be contiguous when the address-of operator is applied, there's a conflict between what the standard requires of your compiler and what you require of it.

It's up to the compiler to decide what to do. I'd think most compilers would give your requirements priority over the standard's, however.

1

There is nothing in the standard about calling conventions or how parameters are passed.

It is true that if you take the address of one variable (or parameter) that one has to be stored in memory. It doesn't say that the value cannot be passed in a register and then stored to memory when its address is taken.

It definitely doesn't affect other variables, who's addresses are not taken.

0

Your basic assumption is flawed. On my machine, foo(1,2,3,4) using your code prints out:

1 -680135568 32767 4196336

Using g++ (Ubuntu 4.4.3-4ubuntu5) 4.4.3 on 64-bit x86.

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