3

I've been using pandas for a while now, I understand what loc and iloc do. But till this day I don't know if these two things stand for something? Are they short for something or abbreviations? Or are they just random?

I interpret iloc as 'index-based-location' which makes sense, but loc is a bit problematic to me, I interpret it as 'location' but it doesn't shout 'label-based-location', why couldn't they call it lloc?

  • 1
    It's Label based locating, and Integer based locating see here it's been asked before. I'd say pronounce it Label of Column and Index/Integer of Column – Jab Feb 16 at 0:56
  • Two separate things, I want to understand the meaning behind the words, not the functionality of it. – Boosted_d16 Feb 16 at 1:10
  • Would this help? In particular the last section where it says: "So, this is what you need to remember:" – Jab Feb 16 at 1:17
  • 1
    I guess loc is location and iloc is integer location. The assumption being that location stands for what the actual indexes are. It used to trip me up because index and integer both start with "i".... I wonder if there is anything else to the nomenclature too. – Francio Rodrigues Feb 16 at 1:27
  • 1
    I knew as you said "I've been using pandas for a while now, I understand what loc and iloc do" Just doesn't seem like there is a real correlating abreviation symantically. It really is just lamens location vs integer location. Human readable labels vs computer logical indexing. Happens for everyone where you know what something does but it's unsettling when you try to rationalize it's meaning or how it does it. Seems that's a Pythonista's nightmare and dream all in one – Jab Feb 16 at 1:28
4

To properly answer your question, as you are asking "Does loc and iloc stand for anything?" and not What is the difference between loc and iloc?.

I've done some research, and found from this github issue which lead me to this summary. And from these docs, I believe this sums up with these statements

Different Choices for Indexing

Object selection has had a number of user-requested additions in order to support more explicit location based indexing.

  • .loc: is primarily label based
  • .iloc: is primarily integer position based

And on the chance we want to include ix

  • .ix supports mixed integer and label based access. It is primarily label based, but will fall back to integer positional access continue

Selection By Label

pandas provides a suite of methods in order to have purely label based indexing... - continued

  • The .loc attribute is the primary access method. ↑

Selection By Position

pandas provides a suite of methods in order to get purely integer based indexing... - continued

  • The .iloc attribute is the primary access method. ↑

This does also apply to .at and .iat as well.

Similarly to loc, at provides label based scalar lookups, while, iat provides integer based lookups analogously to iloc


To sum up

I personally like how I said it in my comment but I will elaborate

It doesn't seem like there is a concrete correlating abreviation symantically or in the docs; other than it really just lamens "location" vs "integer location". Human Readable Labels vs Computer Logical Indexing. It happens for everyone, especially with new or complicated languages or ideoligies; where you know what something does and how to use it, but it's unsettling when you try to rationalize it's meaning or sort of explain or talk yourself through it.

Seems that's a Pythonista's nightmare and dream all in one. - (Me)

By the way I retracted my close vote and gave you an upvote as that did take some guts to ask for more clarification on an already over asked topic but I do know I as well had issues with that when I was learning too. Hope this helps

  • Only the last part (under "To sum up") is relevant, the rest talks about what loc/iloc do again. You might want to consider removing those parts to make your answer clearer. – Boosted_d16 Feb 16 at 19:12
  • I edited it a bit for readability; I know I could have answered with just my comment but I wanted to include as much context as I felt necessary for newcomers unless it really isn’t helpful. – Jab Feb 16 at 23:53

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.