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Here's a simple neural network, where I’m trying to penalize the norm of activation gradients:

class Net(nn.Module):
    def __init__(self):
        super(Net, self).__init__()
        self.conv1 = nn.Conv2d(3, 32, kernel_size=5)
        self.conv2 = nn.Conv2d(32, 64, kernel_size=5)
        self.pool = nn.MaxPool2d(2, 2)
        self.relu = nn.ReLU()
        self.linear = nn.Linear(64 * 5 * 5, 10)

    def forward(self, input):
        conv1 = self.conv1(input)
        pool1 = self.pool(conv1)
        self.relu1 = self.relu(pool1)
        self.relu1.retain_grad()
        conv2 = self.conv2(relu1)
        pool2 = self.pool(conv2)
        relu2 = self.relu(pool2)
        self.relu2 = relu2.view(relu2.size(0), -1)
        self.relu2.retain_grad()
        return self.linear(relu2)

model = Net()
optimizer = torch.optim.SGD(model.parameters(), lr=0.001)

for i in range(1000):
    output = model(input)
    loss = nn.CrossEntropyLoss()(output, label)
    optimizer.zero_grad()
    loss.backward(retain_graph=True)

    grads = torch.autograd.grad(loss, [model.relu1, model.relu2], create_graph=True)

    grad_norm = 0
    for grad in grads:
        grad_norm += grad.pow(2).sum()

    grad_norm.backward()

    optimizer.step()

However, it does not produce the desired regularization effect. If I do the same thing for weights (instead of activations), it works well. Am I doing this right (in terms of pytorch machinery)? Specifically, what happens in grad_norm.backward() call? I just want to make sure the weight gradients are updated, and not activation gradients. Currently, when I print out gradients for weights and activations immediately before and after that line, both change - so I’m not sure what’s going on.

6
  • What do you mean by "activation gradients"? – Chris Holland Feb 19 '19 at 9:19
  • @ChrisHolland, gradients of the loss function with respect to activations (self.relu1 and self.relu2). I want to penalize their growth. – MichaelSB Feb 19 '19 at 17:18
  • ReLU does not have any trainable parameters so there is no gradient – Chris Holland Feb 19 '19 at 18:03
  • I'm not sure what you mean. Why would they need to be trainable to have gradients? How could the error be backpropagated through them if they didn't have gradients? – MichaelSB Feb 19 '19 at 18:25
  • What you are doing here is to start a second optimization process to optimize for the gradient norm, which computes higher order gradients. This means that you are changing your parameters to produce gradients that are getting smaller and smaller - the gradients, not the weights. Besides, it may produce unforeseen consequences, as I'm not sure that the second optimization process does not interfere with the "main" one. So are you sure this is what you want? – cleros Feb 23 '19 at 18:41
1

I think your code ends up computing some of the gradients twice in each step. I also suspect it actually never zeroes out the activation gradients, so they accumulate across steps.

In general:

  • x.backward() computes gradient of x wrt. computation graph leaves (e.g. weight tensors and other variables), as well as wrt. nodes explicitly marked with retain_grad(). It accumulates the computed gradient in tensors' .grad attributes.

  • autograd.grad(x, [y, z]) returns gradient of x wrt. y and z regardless of whether they would normally retain grad or not. By default, it will also accumulate gradient in all leaves' .grad attributes. You can prevent this by passing only_inputs=True.

I prefer to use backward() only for the optimization step, and autograd.grad() whenever my goal is to obtain "reified" gradients as intermediate values for another computation. This way, I can be sure that no unwanted gradients remain lying around in tensors' .grad attributes after I'm done with them.

import torch
from torch import nn
class Net(nn.Module):
    def __init__(self):
        super(Net, self).__init__()
        self.conv1 = nn.Conv2d(3, 32, kernel_size=5)
        self.conv2 = nn.Conv2d(32, 64, kernel_size=5)
        self.pool = nn.MaxPool2d(2, 2)
        self.relu = nn.ReLU()
        self.linear = nn.Linear(64 * 5 * 5, 10)

    def forward(self, input):
        conv1 = self.conv1(input)
        pool1 = self.pool(conv1)
        self.relu1 = self.relu(pool1)
        conv2 = self.conv2(self.relu1)
        pool2 = self.pool(conv2)
        self.relu2 = self.relu(pool2)
        relu2 = self.relu2.view(self.relu2.size(0), -1)
        return self.linear(relu2)


model = Net()
optimizer = torch.optim.SGD(model.parameters(), lr=0.001)
grad_penalty_weight = 10.

for i in range(1000000):
    # Random input and labels; we're not really learning anything
    input = torch.rand(1, 3, 32, 32)
    label = torch.randint(0, 10, (1,))

    output = model(input)
    loss = nn.CrossEntropyLoss()(output, label)

    # This is where the activation gradients are computed
    # only_inputs is optional here, since we're going to call optimizer.zero_grad() later
    # But it makes clear that we're *only* interested in the activation gradients at this point
    grads = torch.autograd.grad(loss, [model.relu1, model.relu2], create_graph=True, only_inputs=True)

    grad_norm = 0
    for grad in grads:
        grad_norm += grad.pow(2).sum()

    optimizer.zero_grad()
    loss = loss + grad_norm * grad_penalty_weight
    loss.backward()
    optimizer.step()

This code appears to work, in that the activation gradients do get smaller. I cannot comment on the viability of this technique as a regularization method.

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  • Thank you, and I apologize for not replying sooner. Very good point about only_inputs parameter. I don't quite understand why do you think the gradients are not zeroed out - I do use optimizer.zero_grad() in my code. Can you please explain? – MichaelSB Sep 19 '19 at 19:15
  • If memory serves, optimizer.zero_grad() zeroes out only the gradients of variables specified at the time of optimizer's construction, in this case model.parameters()., I'm not sure what exactly your code ends up doing as a result. Half an hour with a debugger might clear it up. – Maciej Godek Sep 22 '19 at 6:14

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