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I'm a beginner programmer and I have been faced with exceptions recently. I've done this small test below and the output I received was not the same as the one I expected.

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        ushort var = 65535;
        try
        {
            checked { var++; }
        }
        catch (OverflowException)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Hello!");
            throw;
        }
        catch
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Here I am!");

        }
    }

I was expecting the program to do the following:

  • Try to var++, fail and create an OverflowException;
  • Enter Catch (OverflowException) and write "Hello!";
  • Throw an Exception and enter catch;
  • Write "Here I am!".

However, I only got on screen "Hello!".

EDIT: Thanks to those who commented. I think I'm starting to understand. However, my confusion originated because of this book I'm reading: C# 4.0.

I could show the text, however it is in Portuguese. I'm going to translate what it says: "Sometimes it is useful to propagate the exception through more than one catch. For example, let's suposse it is necessary to show a specific error message due to the fact that the "idade" is invalid, but we still need to close the program, being that part in the global catch. In that case, it is necessary to propagate the exception after the execution of the first catch block. To do that, you only need to do a simple throw with no arguments."

Example from the book

In this example of the book you can see the programmer do the same thing I did. At least it looks like it. Am I missing something? Or is the book wrong?

Hope you can help me. Thanks!

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  • You should use throw when your code in a method, and called method will handle your throw – Hien Nguyen Feb 17 '19 at 0:55
  • 1
    By writing throw in catch block you are rethrowing the exception. It won't be caught in next catch block but it will be caught in outer catch block if there is any. – Chetan Ranpariya Feb 17 '19 at 1:02
  • 1
    If you're wanting to the code in the 2nd catch to execute no matter what the exception is or if there is no exception, try using finally. – Andrew Feb 17 '19 at 1:50
  • It won't catxh the throw, where does the book say so? – TheGeneral Feb 17 '19 at 9:35
  • "Sometimes it is useful to propagate the exception through more than one catch" That should read "more than one try block". Every part of that section seems to confuse the catch with the try block it is part off. Propably a translation error. Except for that one error, it is right btw. Including using 'throw;', as that is the one way to rethrow that does not change the stack trace. – Christopher Feb 17 '19 at 11:29
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You'll get the output you expected if you nest try/catch blocks:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    try
    {
        ushort var = 65535;
        try
        {
            checked { var++; }
        }
        catch (OverflowException)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Hello!");
            throw;
        }
    }
    catch
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Here I am!");
    }
}
2

In short, you are doing it wrong. Let's visit the documentation

Exception Handling (C# Programming Guide)

Multiple catch blocks with different exception filters can be chained together. The catch blocks are evaluated from top to bottom in your code, but only one catch block is executed for each exception that is thrown.

Although it doesn't specifically say you can't catch an exception that has been re-thrown in an exception filter, the fact is you can't. It would be a nightmare and have complicated and unexpected results.

That's all to say, you will need another layer (inner or outer) of try catch to catch the exception that is thrown in catch (OverflowException)

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I have two articles on exception handling I link often. I personally consider them required reading when dealing with them:

https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/ericlippert/2008/09/10/vexing-exceptions/

https://www.codeproject.com/Articles/9538/Exception-Handling-Best-Practices-in-NET

As for this case, you are not throwing a exception. You are re-throwing one you caught. Think of it like a fisherman doing "catch and release". It can be used for some scenarios, like this time I wrote a TryParse replacement for someone stuck on .NET 1.1:

//Parse throws ArgumentNull, Format and Overflow Exceptions.
//And they only have Exception as base class in common, but identical handling code (output = 0 and return false).

bool TryParse(string input, out int output){
  try{
    output = int.Parse(input);
  }
  catch (Exception ex){
    if(ex is ArgumentNullException ||
      ex is FormatException ||
      ex is OverflowException){
      //these are the exceptions I am looking for. I will do my thing.
      output = 0;
      return false;
    }
    else{
      //Not the exceptions I expect. Best to just let them go on their way.
      throw;
    }
  }

  //I am pretty sure the Exception replaces the return value in exception case. 
  //So this one will only be returned without any Exceptions, expected or unexpected
  return true;

}

But as a rule of thumb, you should be using stuff like "finally" blocks for cleanup work rather then catch and release. throw inside a catch block is something you use rarely.

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