12

I have JSON data that I am searching through using filter:

myJsonData.filter(function (entry) { return (entry.type === 'model' || entry.type === 'photographer' ); });

Now instead of specifying those conditions after return, I've created a similar string (because I want to have a list of pre-created search conditions) then using eval() so:

myJsonData.filter(function () { return eval(stringToSearch) ; });

This appears to work. However, I just want to confirm, is this its correct usage? Are there any risks/issues in doing this?

I want to have the flexibility to do, any kind of search e.g.:

myJsonData.filter(function (entry) { 
   return (entry.type === 'model' || entry.type === 'photographer') 
          && entry.level.indexOf('advanced') > -1 ; 
});

That's why I made a separate class to create that string.

8
  • 3
    Inelegant and possibly unsafe. Best to find another way. Feb 17, 2019 at 7:14
  • 1
    You should be able to set up an object filters with the functions you need, and then do myJsonData.filter(filters[selectedFilterName]). That way there can be no code injection.
    – Thilo
    Feb 17, 2019 at 7:15
  • 1
    @CertainPerformance @Thilio - Thanks. So to add more detail, I have a bunch of filter buttons, so each time a new filter button is pressed I may add another condition to the filter in which case I'd need to search the JSON again - e.g. return (entry.type === 'model' || entry.type === 'photographer' ) && entry.location ==='ny' ; Any other suggestions to look into then?
    – userMod2
    Feb 17, 2019 at 7:18
  • Is there anything stopping you from just dynamically creating the callback with whatever logic you need? Feb 17, 2019 at 7:22
  • I think "dynamically creating the callback" is roughly the same effort and logic than what you now need to "dynamically create the string to eval", but much safer.
    – Thilo
    Feb 17, 2019 at 7:24

3 Answers 3

8

To avoid eval you could translate user input (through buttons, or whatever) to filters. Those filters would have one filter per data property (i.e. per location, type, level, ...). One of those filters could either be a list of values, or a free-text single value.

Here is an example implementation with a sample data set, without any sexy input/output widgets,... just the bare minimum to demo the algorithm of filtering:

// The sample data to work with:
var data = [
    { location: "ny", type: "model", level: "advanced", name: "Jack" },
    { location: "ny", type: "model", level: "beginner", name: "Fred" },
    { location: "sf", type: "model", level: "experienced", name: "Helen" },
    { location: "sf", type: "photographer", level: "is advanced", name: "Stacy" },
    { location: "sf", type: "photographer", level: "advanced experience", name: "Joy" },
    { location: "ny", type: "photographer", level: "beginner++", name: "John" },
    { location: "sf", type: "model", level: "no experience", name: "Jim" },
    { location: "ny", type: "photographer", level: "professional", name: "Kay" },
];

// A global variable to maintain the currently applied filters
var filters = { type: [], location: [], level: "" };

// Capture user selections and translate them to filters
// Type 1: multiple selections from a closed list of values:
document.querySelector("#seltypes").addEventListener("change", function() {
    filters.type = [...this.options].filter(option => option.selected).map(option => option.value);
    refresh();
});

document.querySelector("#sellocations").addEventListener("change", function() {
    filters.location = [...this.options].filter(option => option.selected).map(option => option.value);
    refresh();
});

// Type 2: free text filter:
document.querySelector("#inplevel").addEventListener("input", function() {
    filters.level = this.value;
    refresh();
});

function refresh() {
    // This is the actual filtering mechanism, making use of the filters variable
    let result = data;
    for (let prop in filters) {
        let value = filters[prop];
        if (!value.length) continue; // If this filter is empty: don't filter
        result = Array.isArray(value)
            ? result.filter(entry => value.some(type => entry[prop] === type))
            : result.filter(entry => entry[prop].includes(value));
    }
    // No effort done here on the output format: just JSON :-)
    document.querySelector("#output").textContent = JSON.stringify(result, null, 2);
}

// Start 
refresh();
td { vertical-align: top }
<b>Filters (Ctrl to multi select):</b>
<table>
<tr><th>Types</th><th>Locations</th><th>Level</th></tr>
<tr><td>
  <select multiple id="seltypes" size="2">
    <option value="model">Model</option>
    <option value="photographer">Photographer</option>
  </select>
</td><td>
  <select multiple id="sellocations" size="2">
    <option value="ny">New York</option>
    <option value="sf">San Francisco</option>
  </select>
</td><td>
  <input id="inplevel">
</td></tr></table>

<pre id="output"></pre>

4
  • Thanks for this - one bit I don't fully understand, in the line: filters.type = [...this.options].filter(option => option.selected).map(option => option.value); - what does [...this.options] mean?
    – userMod2
    Feb 17, 2019 at 9:11
  • [...this.options] turns a HTMLCollection into a standard array, so that I can use Array methods on it, like filter in this case. I could also have written Array.from(this.options) which may be more readable.
    – trincot
    Feb 17, 2019 at 9:12
  • Ah ok, I think I understand what happening. Well after a run through. Thanks.
    – userMod2
    Feb 17, 2019 at 9:20
  • I don't think that part is essential, as it is specific to the input elements I have used. You may not be using select elements at all. Maybe you will use checkboxes or radiobuttons, ... The important thing is that you find a way to collect the values from the user-input. That's all this line of code is doing.
    – trincot
    Feb 17, 2019 at 9:23
1

You can create an object with the values you want in the output and then filter.

In an if condition I check whether the advanced filter is applied or not. If applied with check for the && condition too. If not, then I will just check the normal condition.

let data  = [{type: 'model', level:'advanced'}, {type:'photographer',level:'advanced'},{type:'random', level:'random'}, {type:'model', value:'without level'}]
let checks = {'model':true, 'photographer':true, advanced:['advanced']}

let output = data.filter(( {type,level} ) => {
  if(checks.advanced && checks.advanced ){
     return checks[type] && checks.advanced.includes(level)
  } else {
    return checks[type]
  }
} )

console.log(output)

4
  • 3
    This does not cover the && entry.location ==='ny' part.
    – Thilo
    Feb 17, 2019 at 7:21
  • @Thilo where is this thing in && entry.location ==='ny' question ? Feb 17, 2019 at 7:22
  • @userMod2 you want output to be true only if all the filter matches right ? can you add more info about that. than will update code accordingly Feb 17, 2019 at 7:26
  • 1
    Well I want to be able to search multiple things in the data, so even something like: myJsonData.filter(function (entry) { return (entry.type === 'model' || entry.type === 'photographer') && entry.level.indexOf('advanced') > -1 ; });
    – userMod2
    Feb 17, 2019 at 7:32
-1

There is nothing wrong in using eval. Here are three ways you could have done it.

There is of course other ways to do it, but this is a much more dynamic approach.

    // The sample data to work with:
    var data = [
        { location: "ny", type: "model", level: "advanced", name: "Jack" },
        { location: "ny", type: "model", level: "beginner", name: "Fred" },
        { location: "sf", type: "model", level: "experienced", name: "Helen" },
        { location: "sf", type: "photographer", level: "is advanced", name: "Stacy" },
        { location: "sf", type: "photographer", level: "advanced experience", name: "Joy" },
        { location: "ny", type: "photographer", level: "beginner++", name: "John" },
        { location: "sf", type: "model", level: "no experience", name: "Jim" },
        { location: "ny", type: "photographer", level: "professional", name: "Kay" },
    ];

    // Example 1
    var searchOne = function(a ){
        return a.location == "ny";
    }

    // Example two: an attribute
    var searchTwo = new Function("a", test.getAttribute("condition"));

    // Example three: filter list, need much work.... to handle operator      // And, OR
    var searchThree = [
        { field: "location", key: "=", value:"ny"  }]

    console.log("example 1")
    console.log(data.filter(searchOne))

    console.log("example 2")
    console.log(data.filter(searchTwo))

    console.log("example 3")
    console.log(data.filter((a)=> {
        var result = true;
        searchThree.forEach((x)=> {
            var v = a[x.field];
            if (x.key == "=")
                result = (v == x.value);
            else if (x.key == "!=")
                result = (v != x.value);
                //.....
        });

        return result;
    }))
    <p id="test" condition="return a.location=='sf';"</p>

9
  • 1
    why do you think eval is not a problem here?
    – user241244
    Feb 17, 2019 at 8:54
  • It all depend on what you are using it for, if its a calculation thing, then its very dangerous. but a simple table filter should not be very dangerous. this so the user want to search a table. so hacking it wont couse a problem. Remember im only using eval on a function that will be included in .filter. This what i think anyway.
    – Alen.Toma
    Feb 17, 2019 at 8:58
  • 1
    i removed eval and added Function instead have a look.
    – Alen.Toma
    Feb 17, 2019 at 9:17
  • 1
    -1 for the first sentence. There is a lot wrong with eval.
    – Bergi
    Feb 17, 2019 at 14:04
  • The problem with Function/eval is not necessary in the way the programmer intends to use it but by using it you open the door to unintended consequences.
    – Dan
    Feb 17, 2019 at 14:12

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