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I have a Google PubSub Topic where objects get published. A service of mine is listening to that Topic (4 Threads), does some transformations, and writes results to a DB. The service, not the DB also assignes an ID to that result (an URN).

The URN is generated as "urn:namespace:name:${UUID.randomUUID()}"

While reading the Topic after a long time this has happened:

17-02-2019 17:41:55.657 [pool-2-thread-3] ERROR o.h.e.jdbc.spi.SqlExceptionHelper.logExceptions - ERROR: duplicate key value violates unique constraint "name_entity_pkey"
  Detail: Key (id)=(urn:namespace:name:d7543a6b-6d09-4df2-b9af-66821e0a8423) already exists.
17-02-2019 17:41:55.657 [pool-2-thread-1] ERROR o.h.e.jdbc.spi.SqlExceptionHelper.logExceptions - ERROR: duplicate key value violates unique constraint "name_entity_pkey"
  Detail: Key (id)=(urn:namespace:name:d7543a6b-6d09-4df2-b9af-66821e0a8423) already exists.

Both UUIDs may were generated at the same microsecond, and interestingly the Exception suggests that this UUID was also generated in the past (around 2019-02-17T08:23:30.972695+01:00)

While I could understand that randomUUID() generates the same UUID if all params (time) are the same too (they should differ in nanoseconds at least?), but from what I see here the do collide more often.

So my question is: Are there any pitfalls I am not aware of or any more random implementations?

I use openJDK-11.

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    Could you provide more context around where you call randomUUID? Could it be that you're assigning the string you've quoted to a variable, and then assigning its value to multiple objects' IDs? In that case, the string template would only run once when the variable is initialized, which could explain the phenomenon. – zsmb13 Feb 17 at 17:21
  • That method gets called for each object individually and its value is not assigned to a variable. After some time of puzzling I suspect that a code path leads to a create instead of an update. It seems too unlikely that I have 3 collisions (2^122 or so). – sschrass Feb 17 at 18:03
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    Random UUIDs (i.e. type 4) don't use time as a parameter and time-based UUIDs (type 1 and 2) have "clock sequence" number so they aren't identical even if the time reported is the same. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universally_unique_identifier – Alexey Romanov Feb 18 at 7:30

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