9

I'm trying to sort an array of nested objects. It's working with a static chosen key but I can't figure out how to get it dynamically.

So far I've got this code

sortBy = (isReverse=false) => {
    this.setState(prevState => ({
        files: prevState.files.sort((a, b) => {
            const valueA = (((a || {})['general'] || {})['fileID']) || '';
            const valueB = (((b || {})['general'] || {})['fileID']) || '';

            if(isReverse) return valueB.localeCompare(valueA);

            return valueA.localeCompare(valueB);
        })
    }));
}

At this point the keys are hardcoded ['general']['orderID'] but I want this part to be dynamic by adding a keys param to the sortBy function:

sortBy = (keys, isReverse=false) => { ...

keys is an array with the nested keys. For the above example, it will be ['general', 'fileID'].

What are the steps that need to be taken to make this dynamic?

Note: child objects can be undefined therefore I'm using a || {}

Note 2: I'm using es6. No external packages.

  • will it contain just two keys or that also can be dynamic – Shubham Khatri Feb 17 at 17:58
  • Sorry for not mentioning. In my current project it can be up to 4 keys so it has to be dynamic – Thore Feb 17 at 18:02
  • @Thore I update my answer and find 2-liner solution - here – Kamil Kiełczewski Feb 18 at 5:43
2

One way could be using reduce() over the new keys argument, like this:

sortBy = (keys, isReverse=false) => {
    this.setState(prevState => ({
        files: prevState.files.sort((a, b) => {
            const valueA = (keys.reduce((acc, key) => (acc || {})[key], a) || '').toString();
            const valueA = (keys.reduce((acc, key) => (acc || {})[key], b) || '').toString();

            if (isReverse) return valueB.localeCompare(valueA);

            return valueA.localeCompare(valueB);
        })
    }));
}
  • Be aware of mutable operations like sort called in setState which can cause bugs in your code – user633183 Feb 18 at 3:40
  • @user633183 I did not put new bugs, the original code already mutates the array. However he can clone the array with slice() if he don't want to mutate the original one: files: prevState.files.slice().sort(...). Anyway, if he wants to accept your elaborated answer, for me is ok, I don't have a problem with that. But I think there is no reason to try to force him. – Shidersz Feb 18 at 4:11
4

You can loop ovver the keys to get the values and then compare them like

sortBy = (keys, isReverse=false) => {

    this.setState(prevState => ({
        files: prevState.files.sort((a, b) => {
            const clonedKey = [...keys];
            let valueA = a;
            let valueB = b
            while(clonedKey.length > 0) {
                const key = clonedKey.shift();
                valueA = (valueA || {})[key];
                valueB = (valueB || {})[key];
            }
            valueA = valueA || '';
            valueB = valueB || '';
            if(isReverse) return valueB.localeCompare(valueA);

            return valueA.localeCompare(valueB);
        })
    }));
}
  • @ziggywiggy Thanks for pointing out the error – Shubham Khatri Feb 17 at 18:58
3

The currently accepted answer apart from putting bugs in your code is not doing much to help you. Use of a simple function deepProp would mitigate the painful repetition -

const deepProp = (o = {}, props = []) =>
  props.reduce((acc = {}, p) => acc[p], o)

Now without so much noise -

sortBy = (keys, isReverse = false) =>
  this.setState ({
    files: // without mutating the previous state!
      [...this.state.files].sort((a,b) => {
        const valueA = deepProp(a, keys) || ''
        const valueB = deepProp(b, keys) || ''
        return isReverse
          ? valueA.localeCompare(valueB)
          : valueB.localeCompare(valueA)
      })
  })

Still, this does little in terms of actually improving your program. It's riddled with complexity, and worse, this complexity will be duplicated in any component that requires similar functionality. React embraces functional style so this answer approaches the problem from a functional standpoint. In this post, we'll write sortBy as -

sortBy = (comparator = asc) =>
  this.setState
    ( { files:
          isort
            ( contramap
                ( comparator
                , generalFileId
                )
            , this.state.files
            )
      }
    )

Your question poses us to learn two powerful functional concepts; we'll use these to answer the question -

  1. Monads
  2. Contravariant Functors

Let's not get overwhelmed by terms though and instead focus on gaining an intuition for how things work. At first, it looks like we have a problem checking for nulls. Having to deal with the possibility that some of our inputs may not have the nested properties makes our function messy. If we can generalize this concept of a possible value, we can clean things up a bit.

Your question specifically says you are not using an external package right now, but this is a good time to reach for one. Let's take a brief look at the data.maybe package -

A structure for values that may not be present, or computations that may fail. Maybe(a) explicitly models the effects that implicit in Nullable types, thus has none of the problems associated with using null or undefined — like NullPointerException or TypeError.

Sounds like a good fit. We'll start by writing a function safeProp that accepts an object and a property string as input. Intuitively, safeProp safely returns the property p of object o -

const { Nothing, fromNullable } =
  require ('data.maybe')

const safeProp = (o = {}, p = '') =>

  // if o is an object
  Object (o) === o

    // access property p on object o, wrapping the result in a Maybe
    ? fromNullable (o[p])

    // otherwise o is not an object, return Nothing
    : Nothing ()

Instead of simply returning o[p] which could be a null or undefined value, we'll get back a Maybe that guides us in handling the result -

const generalFileId = (o = {}) =>

  // access the general property
  safeProp (o, 'general')

    // if it exists, access the fileId property on the child
    .chain (child => safeProp (child, 'fileId'))

    // get the result if valid, otherwise return empty string
    .getOrElse ('') 

Now we have a function which can take objects of varying complexity and guarantees the result we're interested in -

console .log
  ( generalFileId ({ general: { fileId: 'a' } })  // 'a'
  , generalFileId ({ general: { fileId: 'b' } })  // 'b'
  , generalFileId ({ general: 'x' })              // ''
  , generalFileId ({ a: 'x '})                    // ''
  , generalFileId ({ general: { err: 'x' } })     // ''
  , generalFileId ({})                            // ''
  )

That's half the battle right there. We can now go from our complex object to the precise string value we want to use for comparison purposes.

I'm intentionally avoiding showing you an implementation of Maybe here because this in itself is a valuable lesson. When a module promises capability X, we assume we have capability X, and ignore what happens in the black box of the module. The very point of data abstraction is to hide concerns away so the programmer can think about things at a higher level.

It might help to ask how does Array work? How does it calculate or adjust the length property when an element is added or removed from the array? How does the map or filter function produce a new array? If you never wondered these things before, that's okay! Array is a convenient module because it removes these concerns from the programmer's mind; it just works as advertised.

This applies regardless of whether the module is provided by JavaScript, by a third party such as from npm, or if you wrote the module yourself. If Array didn't exist, we could implement it as our own data structure with equivalent conveniences. Users of our module gain useful functionalities without introducing additional complexity. The a-ha moment comes when you realize that the programmer is his/her own user: when you run into a tough problem, write a module to free yourself from the shackles of complexity. Invent your own convenience!

We'll show a basic implementation of Maybe later in the answer, but for now, we just have to finish the sort ...


We start with two basic comparators, asc for ascending sort, and desc for descending sort -

const asc = (a, b) =>
  a .localeCompare (b)

const desc = (a, b) =>
  asc (a, b) * -1

In React, we cannot mutate the previous state, instead, we must create new state. So to sort immutably, we must implement isort which will not mutate the input object -

const isort = (compare = asc, xs = []) =>
  xs
    .slice (0)      // clone
    .sort (compare) // then sort

And of course a and b are sometimes complex objects, so case we can't directly call asc or desc. Below, contramap will transform our data using one function g, before passing the data to the other function, f -

const contramap = (f, g) =>
  (a, b) => f (g (a), g (b))

const files =
  [ { general: { fileId: 'e' } }
  , { general: { fileId: 'b' } }
  , { general: { fileId: 'd' } }
  , { general: { fileId: 'c' } }
  , { general: { fileId: 'a' } }
  ]

isort
  ( contramap (asc, generalFileId) // ascending comparator
  , files
  )

// [ { general: { fileId: 'a' } }
// , { general: { fileId: 'b' } }
// , { general: { fileId: 'c' } }
// , { general: { fileId: 'd' } }
// , { general: { fileId: 'e' } }
// ]

Using the other comparator desc, we can see sorting work in the other direction -

isort
  ( contramap (desc, generalFileId) // descending comparator
  , files 
  )

// [ { general: { fileId: 'e' } }
// , { general: { fileId: 'd' } }
// , { general: { fileId: 'c' } }
// , { general: { fileId: 'b' } }
// , { general: { fileId: 'a' } }
// ]

Now to write the method for your React component, sortBy. The method is essentially reduced to this.setState({ files: t (this.state.files) }) where t is an immutable transformation of your program's state. This is good because complexity is kept out of your components where testing is difficult, and instead it resides in generic modules, which are easy to test -

sortBy = (reverse = true) =>
  this.setState
    ( { files:
          isort
            ( contramap
                ( reverse ? desc : asc
                , generalFileId
                )
            , this.state.files
            )
      }
    )

This uses the boolean switch like in your original question, but since React embraces functional pattern, I think it would be even better as a higher-order function -

sortBy = (comparator = asc) =>
  this.setState
    ( { files:
          isort
            ( contramap
                ( comparator
                , generalFileId
                )
            , this.state.files
            )
      }
    )

If the nested property you need to access is not guaranteed to be general and fileId, we can make a generic function which accepts a list of properties and can lookup a nested property of any depth -

const deepProp = (o = {}, props = []) =>
  props .reduce
    ( (acc, p) => // for each p, safely lookup p on child
        acc .chain (child => safeProp (child, p))
    , fromNullable (o) // init with Maybe o
    )

const generalFileId = (o = {}) =>
  deepProp (o, [ 'general', 'fileId' ]) // using deepProp
    .getOrElse ('')

const fooBarQux = (o = {}) =>
  deepProp (o, [ 'foo', 'bar', 'qux' ]) // any number of nested props
    .getOrElse (0)                      // customizable default

console.log
  ( generalFileId ({ general: { fileId: 'a' } } ) // 'a'
  , generalFileId ({})                            // ''
  , fooBarQux ({ foo: { bar: { qux: 1 } } } )     // 1
  , fooBarQux ({ foo: { bar: 2 } })               // 0
  , fooBarQux ({})                                // 0
  )

Above, we use the data.maybe package which provides us with the capability to work with potential values. The module exports functions to convert ordinary values to a Maybe, and vice versa, as well as many useful operations that are applicable to potential values. There's nothing forcing you to use this particular implementation, however. The concept is simple enough that you could implement fromNullable, Just and Nothing in a couple dozen lines, which we'll see later in this answer -

Run the complete demo below on repl.it

const { Just, Nothing, fromNullable } =
  require ('data.maybe')

const safeProp = (o = {}, p = '') =>
  Object (o) === o
    ? fromNullable (o[p])
    : Nothing ()

const generalFileId = (o = {}) =>
  safeProp (o, 'general')
    .chain (child => safeProp (child, 'fileId'))
    .getOrElse ('')

// ----------------------------------------------
const asc = (a, b) =>
  a .localeCompare (b)

const desc = (a, b) =>
  asc (a, b) * -1

const contramap = (f, g) =>
  (a, b) => f (g (a), g (b))

const isort = (compare = asc, xs = []) =>
  xs
    .slice (0)
    .sort (compare)

// ----------------------------------------------
const files =
  [ { general: { fileId: 'e' } }
  , { general: { fileId: 'b' } }
  , { general: { fileId: 'd' } }
  , { general: { fileId: 'c' } }
  , { general: { fileId: 'a' } }
  ]

isort
  ( contramap (asc, generalFileId)
  , files
  )

// [ { general: { fileId: 'a' } }
// , { general: { fileId: 'b' } }
// , { general: { fileId: 'c' } }
// , { general: { fileId: 'd' } }
// , { general: { fileId: 'e' } }
// ]

The advantages of this approach should be evident. Instead of one big complex function that is difficult to write, read, and test, we've combined several smaller functions that are easier to write, read, and test. The smaller functions have the added advantage of being used in other parts of your program, whereas the big complex function is likely to only be usable in one part.

Lastly, sortBy is implemented as a higher-order function which means we're not limited to only ascending and descending sorts toggled by the reverse boolean; any valid comparator can be used. This means we could even write a specialized comparator that handles tie breaks using custom logic or compares year first, then month, then day, etc; higher-order functions expand your possibilities tremendously.


I don't like making empty promises so I want to show you that it's not difficult to devise your own mechanisms like Maybe. This is also a nice lesson in data abstraction because it shows us how a module has its own set of concerns. The module's exported values are the only way to access the module's functionalities; all other components of the module are private and are free to change or refactor as other requirements dictate -

// Maybe.js
const None =
  Symbol ()

class Maybe
{ constructor (v)
  { this.value = v }

  chain (f)
  { return this.value == None ? this : f (this.value) }

  getOrElse (v)
  { return this.value === None ? v : this.value }
}

const Nothing = () =>
  new Maybe (None)

const Just = v =>
  new Maybe (v)

const fromNullable = v =>
  v == null
    ? Nothing ()
    : Just (v)

module.exports =
  { Just, Nothing, fromNullable } // note the class is hidden from the user

Then we would use it in our module. We only have to change the import (require) but everything else just works as-is because of the public API of our module matches -

const { Just, Nothing, fromNullable } =
  require ('./Maybe') // this time, use our own Maybe

const safeProp = (o = {}, p = '') => // nothing changes here
  Object (o) === o
    ? fromNullable (o[p])
    : Nothing ()

const deepProp = (o, props) => // nothing changes here
  props .reduce
    ( (acc, p) =>
        acc .chain (child => safeProp (child, p))
    , fromNullable (o)
    )

// ...

For more intuition on how to use contramap, and perhaps some unexpected surprises, please explore the following related answers -

  1. multi-sort using contramap
  2. recursive search using contramap
2

You can use a loop to extract a nested property path from an object:

const obj = {
  a: {
    b: {
      c: 3
    }
  } 
}

const keys = ['a', 'b', 'c']

let value = obj;
for (const key of keys) {
  if (!value) break; // stop once we reach a falsy value. Optionally you can make this a tighter check accounting for objects only
  value = value[key];
}

console.log(`c=${value}`);

Then you can wrap the function above into a helper:

function getPath(obj, keys) {
  let value = obj;
  for (const key of keys) {
    if (!value) break; // stop once we reach a falsy value. Optionally you can make this a tighter check accounting for objects only
    value = value[key];
  }
  return value;
}

And use it when obtaining your values:

sortBy = (isReverse = false, keys = []) => {
  this.setState(prevState => ({
    files: prevState.files.sort((a, b) => {
      const valueA = getPath(a, keys) || '';
      const valueB = getPath(b, keys) || '';

      // ...
    })
  }));
}
1

To work with an arbitrary number of keys, you could create a function that could be reused with .reduce() to traverse deeply into nested objects. I'd also put the keys as the last parameter, so that you can use "rest" and "spread" syntax.

const getKey = (o, k) => (o || {})[k];

const sorter = (isReverse, ...keys) => (a, b) => {
  const valueA = keys.reduce(getKey, a) || '';
  const valueB = keys.reduce(getKey, b) || '';

  if (isReverse) return valueB.localeCompare(valueA);

  return valueA.localeCompare(valueB);
};

const sortBy = (isReverse = false, ...keys) => {
  this.setState(prevState => ({
    files: prevState.files.sort(sorter(isReverse, ...keys))
  }));
}

I also moved the sort function out to its own const variable, and made it return a new function that uses the isReverse value.

  • || is mostly an anti-pattern in modern JavaScript thanks to default arguments - const getKey = (o = {}, k) => o[k] – user633183 Feb 18 at 4:24
  • @user633183: It would be necessary here to prevent errors on a null property value. Default params won't handle that case. – ziggy wiggy Feb 19 at 13:38
0

This also handles the case when the path resolves to a non-string value by converting it to string. Otherwise .localeCompare might fail.

sortBy = (keys, isReverse=false) => {
    this.setState(prevState => ({
        files: prevState.files.sort((a, b) => {
            const valueA = getValueAtPath(a, keys);
            const valueB = getValueAtPath(b, keys);

            if(isReverse) return valueB.localeCompare(valueA);

            return valueA.localeCompare(valueB);
        })
    }));
}

function getValueAtPath(file, path) {
    let value = file;
    let keys = [...path]; // preserve the original path array

    while(value && keys.length) {
      let key = keys.shift();
      value = value[key];
    }

    return (value || '').toString();
}
0

Compare elements in sort function in following way:

let v= c => keys.reduce((o,k) => o[k]||'',c)
return (isReverse ? -1 : 1) * v(a).localeCompare(v(b));

likte this:

sortBy = (keys, isReverse=false) => {
    this.setState(prevState => ({
        files: prevState.files.sort((a, b) => {
            let v=c=>keys.reduce((o,k) => o[k]||'',c)
            return (isReverse ? -1 : 1)*v(a).localeCompare(v(b));
        })
    }));
}

Here is example how this idea works:

let files = [
 { general: { fileID: "3"}},
 { general: { fileID: "1"}},
 { general: { fileID: "2"}},
 { general: { }}
];


function sortBy(keys, arr, isReverse=false) {
    arr.sort((a,b,v=c=>keys.reduce((o,k) => o[k]||'',c)) =>             
      (isReverse ? -1 : 1)*v(a).localeCompare(v(b)) )        
}


sortBy(['general', 'fileID'],files,true);
console.log(files);

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