19

This won't compile:

public hello(user?: User): void {
  // ...do some stuff
  console.log(user.toString());      // error: "Object is possibly undefined" 
}

That can be fixed with a type guard:

if (!user) throw Error();

But I want to move that into a separate function, so I tried

private guard(arg: unknown): arg is object {
  if (!arg) throw Error();
}

and I tried

private guard(arg: unknown): arg is object {
 return arg !== undefined;
}

But that doesn't work.

How do I write a custom type guard in a separate function, to assert "not undefined"?

8
  • Maybe something like this? function check<T>(x: T | undefined) { return x || error("Undefined value"); } Commented Feb 17, 2019 at 18:09
  • @PatrickHollweck Thanks. That doesn't work for me. I also tried that with throwing though that also doesn't work.
    – lonix
    Commented Feb 17, 2019 at 18:12
  • @Titian I didn't finish reading your answer before you deleted it... You used animals, my favorite type of example! And there were chickens involved too! :)
    – lonix
    Commented Feb 17, 2019 at 18:15
  • 1
    If you are looking for a no if solution then that is not currently possible .. Commented Feb 17, 2019 at 18:18
  • 1
    posted, You can finish reading the animal example here : stackoverflow.com/questions/54736082/… :) Commented Feb 17, 2019 at 18:24

5 Answers 5

32

You could use a template function like this:

function isDefined<T>(val: T | undefined | null): val is T {
    return val !== undefined && val !== null;
}

This one checks for not undefined and not null.

4
  • Thanks for this, I needed a function that checked for undefined, null, OR empty string but with the one I had Typescript kept thinking items it would return true on could be undefined. I was able to adapt this to work export function hasValue<T> (input: T | undefined | null): input is T { if (input === undefined || input === null) { return false } else if (typeof input === 'string' && input === '') { return false } else { return true } } Commented Jul 1, 2021 at 20:37
  • @dwllama those are all falsy values for a string. So a simple IF statement should have the same result. Commented Sep 11, 2021 at 9:24
  • Maybe it is my linter/formatter that complains (using ts-standard) but if I just check 'if' on a value that isn't a boolean, I get errors. Plus, hasValue can work to check other things vs null or undefined besides just strings. I use it everywhere. Commented Sep 12, 2021 at 18:49
  • better use the ramda or lodash-es !isNil function, or, if you accept the usage of "==" and "!=", val != null
    – Rivenfall
    Commented Feb 14, 2023 at 12:46
2

The code you have should work, this contained example works as is:

type User = { a: string }
function hello(user?: User): void {
  if (guard(user)) {
    console.log(user.toString());
  }
}

function guard(arg: unknown): arg is object {
  return arg !== undefined;
}

If you are looking for a version that does not require an if that is not currently possible, all type guards require some form of conditional statement (if or switch)

2

As of TypeScript 3.7 which was released in Nov 2019, there are assertion functions.

function assertIsDefined<T>(val: T): asserts val is NonNullable<T> {
  if (val === undefined || val === null) {
    throw new AssertionError(
      `Expected 'val' to be defined, but received ${val}`
    );
  }
}

function hello(user?: User): void {
  assertIsDefined(user);
  console.log(user.toString()); // Here user is User
}
0

You could use the lodash helpers which already have type guards defined on them.

import * as _ from 'lodash'
type User = {a: string}
function hello(user?: User): void {
  if (_.isObject(user)) {
    console.log(user.toString())
  }
}
0

I like to use Exclude for this :

export function isDefined<T>(
    unkownTypeVariable: T
): unkownTypeVariable is Exclude<T, undefined> {
    return unkownTypeVariable !== undefined
}

Note: I personaly don't tend to use NonNullable because I like not mixing null and undefined. I think separating both is a powerfull feature in some cases (eg. when patching you could distinguish between erasing a member and just omiting it).

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