157

Using the useContext hook with React 16.8+ works well. You can create a component, use the hook, and utilize the context values without any issues.

What I'm not certain about is how to apply changes to the Context Provider values.

1) Is the useContext hook strictly a means of consuming the context values?

2) Is there a recommended way, using React hooks, to update values from the child component, which will then trigger component re-rendering for any components using the useContext hook with this context?

const ThemeContext = React.createContext({
  style: 'light',
  visible: true
});

function Content() {
  const { style, visible } = React.useContext(ThemeContext);

  const handleClick = () => {
    // change the context values to
    // style: 'dark'
    // visible: false
  }

  return (
    <div>
      <p>
        The theme is <em>{style}</em> and state of visibility is 
        <em> {visible.toString()}</em>
      </p>
      <button onClick={handleClick}>Change Theme</button>
    </div>
  )
};

function App() {
  return <Content />
};

const rootElement = document.getElementById('root');
ReactDOM.render(<App />, rootElement);
<div id="root"></div>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/16.8.2/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react-dom/16.8.2/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>

2 Answers 2

157

How to update context with hooks is discussed in the How to avoid passing callbacks down? part of the Hooks FAQ.

The argument passed to createContext will only be the default value if the component that uses useContext has no Provider above it further up the tree. You could instead create a Provider that supplies the style and visibility as well as functions to toggle them.

Example

const { createContext, useContext, useState } = React;

const ThemeContext = createContext(null);

function Content() {
  const { style, visible, toggleStyle, toggleVisible } = useContext(
    ThemeContext
  );

  return (
    <div>
      <p>
        The theme is <em>{style}</em> and state of visibility is
        <em> {visible.toString()}</em>
      </p>
      <button onClick={toggleStyle}>Change Theme</button>
      <button onClick={toggleVisible}>Change Visibility</button>
    </div>
  );
}

function App() {
  const [style, setStyle] = useState("light");
  const [visible, setVisible] = useState(true);

  function toggleStyle() {
    setStyle(style => (style === "light" ? "dark" : "light"));
  }
  function toggleVisible() {
    setVisible(visible => !visible);
  }

  return (
    <ThemeContext.Provider
      value={{ style, visible, toggleStyle, toggleVisible }}
    >
      <Content />
    </ThemeContext.Provider>
  );
}

ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.getElementById("root"));
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16/umd/react.development.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16/umd/react-dom.development.js"></script>

<div id="root"></div>

10
  • 10
    So is it correct to say that the only value of useContext hook is that it allows you to avoid wrapping a component with a Context.Consumer parent and passing the context value via a function call to the rendered child? Commented Feb 18, 2019 at 1:48
  • 4
    @RandyBurgess Yes, that's right. Creating context with hooks works the same as before, it's just that you consume it with the useContext hook rather than a Context.Consumer with a render prop that you mentioned.
    – Tholle
    Commented Feb 18, 2019 at 8:54
  • 4
    Won't setting value to an object like this re-render all consumers every time the Provider re-renders, per the caveats section of the context documentation? Commented Apr 27, 2020 at 3:41
  • 1
    So how does one prevent constant re-rendering when using the useState hook for the variable that is handed in to the provider?
    – Bombe
    Commented Jun 6, 2020 at 10:02
  • Hello, so we have to pass the states functions to the provider as props in App.js. Is there a way to put these functions in an other file (service or store) and import it ? It seems complicated because the useState functions and the functions that call them (toggleVisible for example) must be in the component that render the context provider. We cant import it from an other component.
    – Getzel
    Commented Aug 16, 2020 at 18:54
43

You can use this approach, no matter how many nested components do you have it will work fine.

// Settings Context - src/context/Settings
import React, { useState } from "react";

const SettingsContext = React.createContext();

const defaultSettings = {
  theme: "light",
};

export const SettingsProvider = ({ children, settings }) => {
  const [currentSettings, setCurrentSettings] = useState(
    settings || defaultSettings
  );

  const saveSettings = (values) => {
   setCurrentSettings(values)
  };

  return (
    <SettingsContext.Provider
      value={{ settings: currentSettings, saveSettings }}
    >
      {children}
    </SettingsContext.Provider>
  );
};

export const SettingsConsumer = SettingsContext.Consumer;

export default SettingsContext;
// Settings Hook - src/hooks/useSettings
import { useContext } from "react";
import SettingsContext from "src/context/SettingsContext";

export default () => {
  const context = useContext(SettingsContext);

  return context;
};
// src/index
ReactDOM.render(
  <SettingsProvider settings={settings}>
    <App />
  </SettingsProvider>,
  document.getElementById("root")
);
// Any component do you want to toggle the theme from
// Example: src/components/Navbar
const { settings, saveSettings } = useSettings();

const handleToggleTheme = () => {
  saveSettings({ theme: "light" });
};
3
  • 2
    "Invalid hook call. Hooks can only be called inside of the body of a function component. " from the hook Commented Jul 27, 2020 at 15:43
  • @ZiiM Instead of making changes by editing this post....you can post that changes as an answer...I think that the original intent of the post should be preserved :) Commented Apr 15, 2021 at 18:28
  • This doesn't work. You always get the default value of the settings. Commented Mar 10, 2023 at 16:47

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