17

I'm trying to combine multiple GraphQL queries into one query using JavaScript.
I am looking for something like this:

let query3 = mergeQueries(query1, query2);

We won't know beforehand which queries will be combined.

Suppose I have queries like this:

input query1:

{
  post(id: 1234) {
    title
    description
  }
}

input query2:

{
  post(id: 1234) {
    tags
    author {
      name
    }
  }
}

Then I would like the result query3 to be:
result query3:

{
  post(id: 1234) {
    title
    tags
    description
    author {
      name
    }
  }
}

This would be the same functionality as lodash _.merge() does for JSON objects, but then with GraphQL queries instead of JSON objects.

2

4 Answers 4

11

My answer is getting a bit to long for a comment so I decided to write a direct answer here. First I think both comments are really helpful. There is a solution that let's two queries share an HTTP request which might already be the optimisation you are looking for. Furthermore merging queries is not trivial. It requires a lot of effort to do this down to a field level. Not only fragments can make this difficult, you also have to take variables into account. As far as I know there is no solution publicly available to do that so you would have to do it yourself. Also I have not heard of a company that does this. I think that the fact that there is no solution is an indicator that it might not be worth it to do it.

I can only guess your problem, but another way to reduce the amount of queries sent by a frontend application is to make use of fragments. While your fragments cannot have variables a healthy component structure will still fit very well with fragments:

fragment PostHeader on Post {
  title
  description
}

fragment PostMeta on Post {
  tags
  author {
    name
  }
}

query {
  post(id: 1234) {
    ...PostHeader
    ...PostMeta
  }
}
2
  • This looks like a very useful solution in many cases. I expect a lot of overlap between the input queries which will make this solution less ideal, so I will look into building my own merge function. Feb 19, 2019 at 7:00
  • We wrote some code for combining fragments, with automatic naming of the fragments and removing duplicate fragments, and released it here: github.com/SVT/graphql-defragmentizer Aug 23, 2019 at 7:19
6

I wrote a lib for this: https://github.com/domasx2/graphql-combine-query

import comineQuery from 'graphql-combine-query'

import gql from 'graphql-tag'

const fooQuery = gql`
  query FooQuery($foo: String!) {
    getFoo(foo: $foo)
  }
`

const barQuery = gql`
  query BarQuery($bar: String!) {
    getBar(bar: $bar)
  }
`

const { document, variables } = combineQuery('FooBarQuery')
  .add(fooQuery, { foo: 'some value' })
  .add(barQuery, { bar: 'another value' })

console.log(variables)
// { foo: 'some value', bar: 'another value' }

print(document)
/*
query FooBarQuery($foo: String!, $bar: String!) {
   getFoo(foo: $foo)
   getBar(bar: $bar)
}
*/

3
  • This seemed hopeful, but it's really fresh and has bugs. Not the least of which is the package name being misspelled in package.json.
    – ivanjonas
    Jul 16, 2020 at 13:28
  • @ivanjonas, what was the bug, other than package name? Jul 16, 2020 at 17:31
  • @DomasLapinskas Does this limit the network calls as well to just one ?
    – Shujath
    Feb 11, 2021 at 13:17
6

Thanks to parameterized fragments you can take variables into account! Assuming post is a field of the root query type the combined query referring to the above example would be:

fragment PostHeader on RootQueryType {
  post(id: $id) {
    tags
    author {
      name
    }
  }
}

fragment PostMeta on RootQueryType {
  post(id: $id) {
    tags
    author {
      name
    }
  }
}

# ID being the id type
query($id: ID! = 1234) {
  ...PostHeader
  ...PostMeta
}

or rather in a real-world scenario you'd be passing in the id dynamically (e.g. in your post request), see: https://graphql.org/learn/queries/#variables

1

Now with graphql-request you can also do batching with queries:

import { batchRequests, gql } from 'graphql-request';

const bookQuery = gql`
    query book($title: String!) {
        book(title: $title) {
            title
        }
    }
`;

const endpoint = 'localhost/graphql/api/';

const books = await batchRequests(endpoint, [
      { document: bookQuery, variables: { title: 'Book 1' } },
      { document: bookQuery, variables: { title: 'Book 2' } },
    ]);

Then you'll have books as a list of { data: book: { title } }. So it works with queries, mutation and duplicates.

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