-3

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struct A {
public:
    A() {
        std::cout << "A" << std:: endl;
    }
    void foo() { std::cout << "foo is called from A"; }
};

struct B : virtual A {  };
struct C : virtual  A {  };
struct D : B, C { D() { std::cout << "D" << std::endl; } };

struct E : D { };
struct F : D {};
struct G : E, F {}; 


int main()
{
    G g;
    g.foo();
}

The output code is :

  • A
  • D
  • D
  • foo is called from A

This makes no sense. Object D is constructed twice. Why doesn't the compiler complain that foo is ambiguous? How does G know that there is only one definition on foo ? (in this case D is made twice and I did not use virtual inheritance but somehow it knows.) I honestly thought that E and F should inherent also virtually from D in order to avoid the ambiguous definition of foo. Can anyone offer a good explanation? Compiled in VS 2017 Windows. You can imagine this line of inheritance as a double diamond problem.

marked as duplicate by bruno, Mark Ingram, codekaizer, Galik c++ Feb 18 at 13:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    Why is it marked? Nobody asked this type of question before. Regarding this behavior. More exactly I think this a good example of what "most derived object type" actually means explicitly. Most examples deal with direct virtual inheritance and forget that this will go up the chain to the most derived regardless of who will virtually inherit first who is second and so on. – Gabriel Grigoras Feb 18 at 13:53
2

This makes no sense.

Why? This is exactly what virtual inheritance is for. There is only a single A sub-object inside G. The specifier sticks as we go down the hierarchy, so even though G has two D's, they both share an A.

  • That is not logical. How does the compiler know that multiple D should contain the same base A? In the case I presented struct B : virtual A { }; struct C : virtual A { }; explicitly tell the compiler that anyone that inherits from B or C should explicitly instantiate A once but struct D : B, C does NOT. – Gabriel Grigoras Feb 18 at 13:32
  • @GabrielGrigoras - It knows it, because that's the semantics of the virtual keyword when applied to bases. virtual means that the class agrees to share its base sub-object with any other class that inherits virtually in the most derived object type (G in your example). No matter how complex your hierarchy is, all classes for which A is a virtual base will share the same base instance. This is also why the most derived object type, and only it, is the one responsible for the initialization of this A. – StoryTeller Feb 18 at 13:35
  • TY. Best explanation. I missed "most derived object type". – Gabriel Grigoras Feb 18 at 13:49
3

Object D is constructed twice.

This is because the object has two D bases. One through E and another through F.

Why doesn't the compiler complain that foo is ambiguous?

Because there is only one A base. This is because it is a virtual base. There is always exactly one virtual base sub object of its type for each concrete instance.

Here is a rough ASCII-art of the inheritance:

non-virtual  |   virtual
             |   A
 ____________|__/
/   /  /  /  |
B  C  B  C   |
 \/    \/    |
  D     D    |
   \   /     |
    E  F     |       bases
_____\/______________________
      G              concrete

How does the compiler know that multiple D should contain the same base A

Because it knows that all of those A-bases are virtual.

  • That is not logical. How does the compiler know that multiple D should contain the same base A. In the case I presented struct B : virtual A { }; struct C : virtual A { }; explicitly tell the compiler that anyone that inherits from B or C should explicitly instantiate A once but struct D : B, C does NOT. – Gabriel Grigoras Feb 18 at 13:30
  • I don't understand how the compiler knows that all who inherent from D should (even if it's multiple types) should use the same A. – Gabriel Grigoras Feb 18 at 13:34
  • 1
    @GabrielGrigoras The compiler sees the keyword virtual. The compiler knows what it means. It means that there is one virtual base of that type shared across the entire derived object. – eerorika Feb 18 at 13:41
  • So that means that it's somehow inherited? – Gabriel Grigoras Feb 18 at 13:44

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