9

New to Python here.

I am looking for a simple way of creating a list (Output), which returns the count of the elements of another objective list (MyList) while preserving the indexing(?).

This is what I would like to get:

MyList = ["a", "b", "c", "c", "a", "c"]
Output = [ 2 ,  1 ,  3 ,  3 ,  2 ,  3 ]

I found solutions to a similar problem. Count the number of occurrences for each element in a list.

In  : Counter(MyList)
Out : Counter({'a': 2, 'b': 1, 'c': 3})

This, however, returns a Counter object which doesn't preserve the indexing.

I assume that given the keys in the Counter I could construct my desired output, however I am not sure how to proceed.

Extra info, I have pandas imported in my script and MyList is actually a column in a pandas dataframe.

11

Instead of listcomp as in another solution you can use the function itemgetter:

from collections import Counter
from operator import itemgetter

lst = ["a", "b", "c", "c", "a", "c"]

c = Counter(lst)
itemgetter(*lst)(c)
# (2, 1, 3, 3, 2, 3)

UPDATE: As @ALollz mentioned in the comments this solution seems to be the fastet one. If OP needs a list instead of a tuple the result must be converted wih list.

4
  • 2
    perhaps list(itemgetter(*MyList)(c)) to match the output, but I'm surprised this doesn't have more votes. Seems to be the fastest solution
    – ALollz
    Feb 18 '19 at 15:23
  • 1
    @ALollz Nice! You are right about the list. I thought it’s easy and OP probably knows how to do it. Maybe he needs just an array. Feb 18 '19 at 15:33
  • 1
    Definitely the fastest, I have a follow-up question thou. Does importing extra modules have any negative effect on the code performance? I had previously implemented @ALollz 's solution as it looked the fastest and didn't require any module and (most probably) I would import itemgetter and Counter just for this operation
    – Gio
    Feb 18 '19 at 15:36
  • I think let it be not delete answer, but let it be for me ;)
    – jezrael
    Oct 23 '19 at 9:23
5

You can use the list.count method, which will count the amount of times each string takes place in MyList. You can generate a new list with the counts by using a list comprehension:

MyList = ["a", "b", "c", "c", "a", "c"]

[MyList.count(i) for i in MyList]
# [2, 1, 3, 3, 2, 3]
6
  • works on the example but it doesn't on my list. It returns the following: KeyError: 'Level 1111111111ABC11111 not found'. (which is the first element I am counting)
    – Gio
    Feb 18 '19 at 14:52
  • Can you share your actual list? @Gio
    – yatu
    Feb 18 '19 at 14:53
  • Nope, unfortunately I can't. The best I can do is give you a masked example, not sure it can be of any help. I can confirm that the elements are strings thou: In : type(df.iloc[1]["MyList"]) Out: str
    – Gio
    Feb 18 '19 at 15:04
  • Hmm this should be working fine, make sure you are MyList is actually a list. And also that you are using it both to iterate in the list comprehension and to count the values.
    – yatu
    Feb 18 '19 at 15:06
  • 1
    Well a pandas series is not a list @Gio. This is a list method. You can turn your series to a list with Series.tolist()
    – yatu
    Feb 18 '19 at 15:21
5

Use np.unique to create a dictionary of value counts and map the values. This will be fast, though not as fast as the Counter methods:

import numpy as np

list(map(dict(zip(*np.unique(MyList, return_counts=True))).get, MyList))
#[2, 1, 3, 3, 2, 3]

Some timings for a moderate sized list:

MyList = np.random.randint(1, 2000, 5000).tolist()

%timeit [MyList.count(i) for i in MyList]
#413 ms ± 165 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

%timeit list(map(dict(zip(*np.unique(MyList, return_counts=True))).get, MyList))
#1.89 ms ± 1.73 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

%timeit pd.DataFrame(MyList).groupby(MyList).transform(len)[0].tolist()
#2.18 s ± 12.4 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

c=Counter(MyList)
%timeit lout=[c[i] for i in MyList]
#679 µs ± 2.33 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

c = Counter(MyList)
%timeit list(itemgetter(*MyList)(c))
#503 µs ± 162 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

Larger list:

MyList = np.random.randint(1, 2000, 50000).tolist()

%timeit [MyList.count(i) for i in MyList]
#41.2 s ± 5.27 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

%timeit list(map(dict(zip(*np.unique(MyList, return_counts=True))).get, MyList))
#18 ms ± 56.9 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)

%timeit pd.DataFrame(MyList).groupby(MyList).transform(len)[0].tolist()
#2.44 s ± 12.5 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

c=Counter(MyList)
%timeit lout=[c[i] for i in MyList]
#6.89 ms ± 22.9 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)

c = Counter(MyList)
%timeit list(itemgetter(*MyList)(c))
#5.27 ms ± 10.3 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)
3
  • Interesting to see how much more optimised Counter is for this task
    – yatu
    Feb 18 '19 at 15:26
  • Yes, I was really surprised. One of these days I'll install perfplot to make it easier to see.
    – ALollz
    Feb 18 '19 at 15:28
  • Hope I would be able to see the plot. would be very interesting. :)
    – anky
    Feb 18 '19 at 15:35
3

You just need to implement below piece of code

    c=Counter(MyList)
    lout=[c[i] for i in MyList]

now list lout is your desired output

2
  • 2
    You might want to initialise the Counter outside the list comprehension, and then simply access its values, rather than creating len(MyList) Counters
    – yatu
    Feb 18 '19 at 14:38
  • @yatu yes you are right. Since it was a small list, I have just given it as in one line.I have edited the answer now. :) Feb 18 '19 at 14:45
3

A pandas solution looks like this:

df = pd.DataFrame(data=["a", "b", "c", "c", "a", "c"], columns=['MyList'])
df['Count'] = df.groupby('MyList')['MyList'].transform(len)

Edit: One shouldn't use pandas if this is the only thing you want to do. I only answered this question because of the pandas tag.

The performance depends on the number of groups:

MyList = np.random.randint(1, 10, 10000).tolist()
df = pd.DataFrame(MyList)

%timeit [MyList.count(i) for i in MyList]
# 1.32 s ± 15.9 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)
%timeit df.groupby(0)[0].transform(len)
# 3.89 ms ± 112 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)

MyList = np.random.randint(1, 9000, 10000).tolist()
df = pd.DataFrame(MyList)

%timeit [MyList.count(i) for i in MyList]
# 1.36 s ± 11.2 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)
%timeit df.groupby(0)[0].transform(len)
# 1.33 s ± 19.8 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)
1
  • Works perfectly but it gets slow quite fast (just tried on a sample dataset with 15k observations)
    – Gio
    Feb 18 '19 at 15:09
1

Note there was the indication from @Gio that list was pandas Series object. In that case you can convert Series object to list:

import pandas as pd

l = ["a", "b", "c", "c", "a", "c"]
ds = pd.Series(l) 
l=ds.tolist()
[l.count(i) for i in ds] 
# [2, 1, 3, 3, 2, 3]

But, once you have the Series, you can count the elements via value_counts.

l = ["a", "b", "c", "c", "a", "c"]
s = pd.Series(l) #Series object
c=s.value_counts() #c is Series again
[c[i] for i in s] 
# [2, 1, 3, 3, 2, 3]
0

This is one from the hettinger's classic snippets :)

from collections import Counter, OrderedDict

class OrderedCounter(Counter, OrderedDict):
     'Counter that remembers the order elements are first seen'
     def __repr__(self):
         return '%s(%r)' % (self.__class__.__name__,
                            OrderedDict(self))
     def __reduce__(self):
         return self.__class__, (OrderedDict(self),)

x = ["a", "b", "c", "c", "a", "c"]
oc = OrderedCounter(x)
>>> oc
OrderedCounter(OrderedDict([('a', 2), ('b', 1), ('c', 3)]))
>>> oc['a']
2

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