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I wrote a simple C++ class for automatic tests (which I simplified as much as I could for the question)

class TestCase {
    int passed, failed; // keeps the number of tests passed/failed so far.

public:
    TestCase(): passed(0), failed(0) {}

    void print() const {
        int total = passed+failed;
        int grade = (total==0? 0: 100*passed/total);
        cout << "\n*** Right: " << passed << ". Wrong: " << failed << ". Grade: " << grade << " ***\n";
    }

    TestCase& check_equal(int actual, int expected) {
        if (actual==expected) {
            passed++;
        } else {
            failed++;
            cout << "The result is " << actual << " but it should equal " << expected << "!" << endl;
        }
        return *this;
    }
};

Which I use like this:

TestCase testcase;
testcase
.check_equal(sum(1,2), 3)
.check_equal(factorial(5), 120)
...
.check_equal(fibonacci(4), 3)
.print();

It works fine as long as the checked functions do not throw exceptions. If any function inside "check_equal" throws an exception - nothing is printed. I can wrap the entire block in try & catch, like:

TestCase testcase;
try {
    testcase
    .check_equal(sum(1,2), 3)
    .check_equal(factorial(5), 120)
    ...
    .check_equal(fibonacci(4), 3)
} catch (...) {
   testcase.print();
}

But then, if the first check succeeds and the second check throws an exception, the grade is 100, since passed=1, failed=0, total=1. This is obviously wrong.

I could, of course, decide that in case of an exception, the grade is 0, but this wrong too, since some checks did succeed. I would like the grade to be e.g. the number of successes so far divided by the total number of tests. However, the class does not know the total number of tests since the exception happens before it gets to see all the tests!

A possible solution is to wrap each function-call that is passed to check_equal in a try-catch block, but this becomes very cumbersome when there are many small tests.

What is an elegant solution for fixing this class?

2

What you can do is defer the function call that initialized actual to happen inside the function. Then check_equal can handle the exception and if one does arise, cancel it (by catching it) and then recording a failure. There are a few different ways to handle how to do this but one way is using a lambda like

template <typename Func>
TestCase& check_equal(Func actual, int expected) {
    try {
        auto act = actual();
        if (act==expected) {
            passed++;
        } else {
            failed++;
            cout << "The result is " << act << " but it should equal " << expected << "!" << endl;
        }
    }
    catch(...) {
        failed++;
    }
    return *this;
}

and you would call it like

TestCase testcase;
testcase
.check_equal([](){return sum(1,2);}, 3)
.check_equal([](){return factorial(5);}, 120)
...
.check_equal([](){return fibonacci(4);}, 3)
.print();

You can even use a macro to remove the boiler plate like

#define FUNCTOR(func) [](){return func;}

TestCase testcase;
testcase
.check_equal(FUNCTOR(sum(1,2)), 3)
.check_equal(FUNCTOR(factorial(5)), 120)
...
.check_equal(FUNCTOR(fibonacci(4)), 3)
.print();
  • It works great with simple functions, but it does not work with classes: .check_equal([](){return obj.size();}, 6) generates the error "variable 'obj' cannot be implicitly captured in a lambda with no capture-default specified" – Erel Segal-Halevi Feb 19 at 9:29
  • The problem was solved by replacing "[]" with "[&]". Not sure it this is the right solution for all cases. – Erel Segal-Halevi Feb 19 at 9:33
  • @ErelSegal-Halevi Capturing by reference is okay in this scenario. You have to be careful with reference that you don't pass the lambda up out of scope but since we only pass it down the call stack and it dies when the function ends/end of the full expression it's safe. – NathanOliver Feb 19 at 13:28

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