26

When should one of the following statements be used over the other?

typedef struct Foo {
    int a;
} Bar;

and

typedef struct {
    int a;
} Bar;

and use it like

Bar bar1 = { 5 };

I understand the second on is an anonymous struct but not sure when should one be used over the other.

4
  • 2
    When you create a linked list, for example, you need to use the name of the struct inside the struct - in which case you have to use the first example. in other cases I don't think there is an advantage to the first over the second
    – user8027470
    Feb 18 '19 at 18:00
  • Related: stackoverflow.com/q/54753213/6699433
    – klutt
    Feb 18 '19 at 18:35
  • This is an almost exact duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1110944/… but since both the question and the answers here are better I don't want to have this one closed. What's the appropriate action here? Flagging the other question (which is 10 years old!) as a duplicate of this one? Feb 19 '19 at 11:43
  • @FabioTurati There is nothing that says that the newer should be a duplicate of the older. Quality of questions and answers are far more important, so if you think the way you do, it is perfectly ok to flag the older one as a dup of this.
    – klutt
    Jul 22 '19 at 22:38
21

They are pretty much equivalent. Actually, you can and should use the same name on both places. Use the same name unless you can come up with a good reason not to.

One situation where you want the non-anonymous is when you want pointers to an object of the same type, like in a linked list.

typedef struct Node {
    struct Node* next;
    int data;
} Node;

One alternative:

typedef struct Node Node;

struct Node {
    Node * next;
    int data;
};

According to Linus Torvalds, you should avoid typedefing structs unless you want to hide it. From the Linux kernel coding style guide:

Please don’t use things like vps_t. It’s a mistake to use typedef for structures and pointers. When you see a vps_t a; in the source, what does it mean? In contrast, if it says struct virtual_container *a; you can actually tell what a is.

Lots of people think that typedefs help readability. Not so. They are useful only for:

a) totally opaque objects (where the typedef is actively used to hide what the object is).

...

According to that, you should never use anonymous structs, and the typedefs are strictly for interfaces. So it should look like this:

typedef struct Node {
    struct Node* next;
    int data;
} Node;

But if you are really creating an interface, you should in general separate it into a header file and a source file. In this case, put the typedef in the header file and do NOT use the typedef:ed type at all in the source file.

.c

struct Node {
    struct Node* next;
    int data;
} Node;

void insert(struct Node* head, int data) 
{
// Code
}    

.h

typedef struct Node Node;

void insert(Node* head, int data);

Taking all of the above into consideration, the only valid situation to use an anonymous struct is if you declare an object at the same time like this:

struct {
    int data;
    float more_data;
} myObject; 
2
  • Well one difference I just found out is that you can't define static members inside anonymous/unnamed structures; that's because then you cannot access it properly. For example, if you go struct {static int a; int b;}; then you cannot set a via i.e. int MyStructName::a = 0;, because myStructName is not defined. Jan 22 '20 at 17:38
  • @MicheleIafrancesco This is not about C++
    – klutt
    Jan 22 '20 at 17:48
8

It doesn't really matter much. If you use the tagged form you can have pointers to struct Foo inside struct Foo (AKA Bar)

typedef struct Foo{
  int a;
  struct Foo *foop;
} Bar;

but there's no way to do that with the second form

typedef struct {
  int a;
  //Baz *p; not valid here since Baz isn't a typename yet
} Baz;

Some codebases prefer not to use typedefs at all and simply spell out struct Foo with the struct keyword every time.

Also, with the first form, you can refer to the type either via the tag (struct Foo) or with typedefs (Bar or any future/previous typedefs (you can do typedef struct Foo PreviousTypedef; before you provide the definition).

With the second form, on the other hand, you can only use the Baz typedef and possible future typedefs (you can't forward-typedef the struct since it doesn't have a tag).

(Note that typedef doesn't really define types in C. The struct optional_tag { /*...*/ } part does. Rather, typedef provides type aliases (so perhaps it should have been named typealias).)

6

One time where the former is required is if you're making a linked list:

typedef struct list {
    int data;
    struct list *next;
} list;

The typedef list is not visible inside of the struct definition, so you need to use the actual struct name to create a pointer to it.

If you don't have such a structure, you can use either one.

What you shouldn't do however is use a tag name that starts with an underscore, i.e.:

typedef struct _list {
    int data;
    struct list *next;
} list;

Because names starting with a underscore are reserved by the implementation.

1
  • 2
    It's more complcated, but never starting with an underscore nor using consecutive underscores is a good rule of thumb. Feb 19 '19 at 1:07
5

The term anonymous struct is already used for something else: in nested structs (or unions) that don't have a name at all and whose fields are referred to as if they were entries in the parent.

The actual question about when to use one or the other is that you have to use the first form if you want to add a pointer to its own type inside it like so:

typedef struct Foo { struct Foo* Child; ... } Foo;

However, what I would prefer is to do that with a typedef like so:

typedef struct Foo Foo;
struct Foo {Foo* Child;};
3

A lot of other people are focusing on the self referential aspect of this, but another reason to avoid doing this is that due to the lack of namespaces in C. In some circles it is standard practice to not typedef structs to avoid struct qualifier and instead refer to structs with the full specifier (eg void foo(struct Foo* foo_ptr)). So if you wanted to maintain such a style, you wouldn't have the option to abuse anonymous structs, so this:

typedef struct {
  int a;
} Bar;

Bar bar1 = {5};

should always instead be

struct Bar{
  int a;
};

struct Bar bar1 = {5};

otherwise you couldn't even compile bar1's instantiation with out typedefing away the struct qualifier

7
  • 1
    What's the benefit? The vast majority of custom types are structs, not enums or unions. It's pretty clear that you're talking about a struct, without explicitly stating it.
    – Alexander
    Feb 19 '19 at 3:39
  • 1
    @Alexander it isn't about being clear that something is a struct, its about maximizing use of the single namespace C gives you. A typedefd struct name can conflict with enums, unions, functions and structs, but if you don't typedef out the struct qualifier, structs can only conflict with other structs, greatly reducing the potential for namespace conflicts.
    – Krupip
    Feb 19 '19 at 14:19
  • 1
    If your struct names conflict with functions, unions or enums, then your names suck. Structs should be nouns, functions should be verbs and verb phrases, thus they should never overlap. Enum names almost always imply they're enums, with words like FooKind, FooTypes, FooIDs, etc., and unions are pretty rare. You should never really use unions directly, anyway, so their names are usually some kind of _ prefixed private API. A union doesn't store its "active case", so you almost always have to use it as part of a struct that also stores an enum tag.
    – Alexander
    Feb 19 '19 at 16:13
  • 1
    @Alexander There are quite a lot of nouns and verbs that are spelled the same way. Like attack, echo, catch, battle, work just to name a few.
    – klutt
    Jul 22 '19 at 23:01
  • @klutt Fair enough, but I still don't think that's justification for this. C only gives you 4 namespaces (that I know of). The global one, and the ones for structs, unions and enum. If your name is conflict prone, and your only workaround is to move it from the global namespace to the struct namespace, then that's pretty crappy.
    – Alexander
    Jul 22 '19 at 23:44
2

When creating an opaque data type which is when the header only contains a forward declaration of the struct and the actual definition of it's members is in the source file. Since you cannot forward declare a typedef you'll have to give a struct a name. Example:

Foo.h

typedef struct Foo_ Foo;

Foo.c

struct Foo_ {
    int a;
};

Also when you have a recursive data structure such as linked list which everyone else has mentioned.

1
  • Why the underscore on Foo_?
    – klutt
    Aug 7 '19 at 10:40

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