1

What should an application do, if a $_POST variable is missing, which is required to perform the action?

For example, imagine I have a form with an <input name="title"> and I have some page, which processes the resulting POST request. Now, what should this page do, if it gets a request, but no $_POST['title'] variable was set?

To make it clear: By "not set" I mean, that an invalid request is made, which a normal user cannot do, only somebody making a manual request to my form processing page, i.e. somebody trying to do things with my site, I don't want it to be done with.

Some possibilities:

  • Just die.
  • Print a fancy error message, like you would do, it the field were just empty.
  • Block further requests from this IP.
  • 1
    Pody your code men – Shakti Singh Mar 29 '11 at 16:29
  • Show a descriptive error message and provide an alternative? – Álvaro González Mar 29 '11 at 16:29
  • @charlie: That should be an answer. It is one of the possible ways to think about this. – NikiC Mar 29 '11 at 16:51
2

I tend to favour the redirect. If someone is coming from somewhere they shouldn't be coming from, or doing something they shouldn't be doing - I just take them someplace else, silently and without fuss.

If you fill in my form and it doesn't validate server side, I take you back to the form, point out your mistakes, pre-fill it with your values and encourage you to try again.

If you don't fill in my form and it doesn't validate server side, I either do the same as above, or I just dump you on the form page as though it never happened.

The important thing is that if you don't want people to be able to directly POST data to a page, that you stop them from doing so - its less important what you actually do with the user since they are clearly using your site in an unnatural way. They are probably automated bots and could not care less what happened to them anyway, especially if you're talking about some form that could be construed as something that might allow comments or otherwise publish some text to a site. The spammers just LOVE those.

On that note - you should of course take care to protect your site from bots that can recognise what a valid POST looks like and spoof it. Something like ReCaptcha does the trick, but there are many ways to do it.

5

Return to the page with the form and indicate to the user that the title has to be set.

4

Check for and sanitize your expected POST keys.

if (isset($_POST['title'])) {
    // sanitize and use title here
}
else die("Missing required field: 'title'.");

Edit: Because we do not like die(), how about this:

if (isset($_POST['title'])) {
    // sanitize and use title here
}
else 
{
    // handle an invalid POST. You could redirect to form 
    // page, display an error, or whatever works for your
    // application.
}
  • I did not downvote but the isset is not much helful here title will always be set here although it contain null if no input there – Shakti Singh Mar 29 '11 at 16:42
  • I down voted you because I believe that using die for checking form variables is incorrect. – RobertPitt Mar 29 '11 at 16:42
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    The way I understood the question, he's asking about people manually submitting POST data to the page, not through his form. "To make it clear: By "not set" I mean, that an invalid request is made, which a normal user cannot do, only somebody making a manual request to my form processing page, i.e. somebody trying to do things with my site, I don't want it to be done with." And, I agree that using die() is not usually the best approach, but, it demonstrates the logic. – Micah Carrick Mar 29 '11 at 16:45
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    @Shakti: No. If the webserver receives a POST request, which body doesn't specify a title variable, it will not be set. And this is, what this is about ;) – NikiC Mar 29 '11 at 16:49
  • 1
    @Shakti: If I were to use the curl command to post data to his script, not using his form, and I did not specify a 'title' in that POST request, then the isset() would catch that. – Micah Carrick Mar 29 '11 at 16:53
1

"[...]somebody trying to do things with my site, I don't want it to be done with"

Don't care too much about them. Just put a die("Try again loser!"); and let it go. Good design and generally good things are made for people who use your site as it is supposed to be. People who try to make bad things to your site deserve just a blank page with some bold text.

  • I wouldn't even give them the satisfaction of acknowledging their attempt to use a program in a way I didn't design for. Besides, it might just spur them on to have another go - when we would really just want them to begone. – Codecraft Mar 29 '11 at 18:29

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