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How do I delete a certain file in linux if its size is 0. I want to execute this in an crontab without any extra script.

l filename.file | grep 5th-tab | not eq 0 | rm

Something like this?

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  • This is not a duplicate, I was looking to do it with just one file I know by name, the ! -s is what I was after and that question doesn't mention it. – Boris Jan 7 at 18:35
284

This will delete all the files in a directory (and below) that are size zero.

find /tmp -size  0 -print -delete

If you just want a particular file;

if [ ! -s /tmp/foo ] ; then
  rm /tmp/foo
fi
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    shortcut: [ -s /tmp/foo ] || rm /tmp/foo (test if size is zero, else remove). Also note the xargs is unsafe if file/directory names contain spaces; find ... -exec rm '{}' \; is safe in that situation. – FrankH. May 13 '11 at 10:25
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    @Frank, you are incorrect about xargs. The '-print0` and xargs -0 corrects for the spaces. – Paul Tomblin May 13 '11 at 10:49
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    @FrankH: Plus, even if using find -exec, always favour + over ; in cases where you can (and this is one such case). – Chris Jester-Young Jun 10 '11 at 20:47
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    Would rm -- (note the trailing -- characters) be safer here than simply rm to prevent rogue filenames? serverfault.com/questions/337082/… – OnlineCop Oct 26 '15 at 23:20
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    @SimonBaars find /tmp -size 0 -print0 |xargs -0 echo rm – Paul Tomblin Apr 22 '18 at 20:26
268

you would want to use find:

 find . -size 0 -delete
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    I would add "-type f", as also directory are marked to be of size zero. The "dot" is optional. – Antonio Aug 2 '13 at 10:28
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    The "dot" is optional for Linux, but not optional for Mac OS – Jakub M. Jan 31 '14 at 11:22
  • @JakubM. Thanks, I edited my answer accordingly. – Antonio Feb 11 '14 at 15:15
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    There is an -empty option :-) – lilydjwg Mar 20 '16 at 12:42
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    @lilydjwg Exactly, if we're allowed to use non POSIX flags, find . -empty -delete is the coolest. :-) – Anne van Rossum Oct 19 '16 at 19:32
134

To search and delete empty files in the current directory and subdirectories:

find . -type f -empty -delete

-type f is necessary because also directories are marked to be of size zero.


The dot . (current directory) is the starting search directory. If you have GNU find (e.g. not Mac OS), you can omit it in this case:

find -type f -empty -delete

From GNU find documentation:

If no files to search are specified, the current directory (.) is used.

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    Very elegant solution! – Nick Oct 7 '14 at 20:45
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    I would add -name '*.SomeFileExtension' for example: if you wanted to delete just text files then I would use: find . -name '*.txt' -type f -empty -delete – jspek Apr 18 '19 at 16:30
  • @jspek, well, that depends if you have that specific use... Usually when you are after empty files you are up to kill them all. :) – Antonio Apr 18 '19 at 20:45
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    Had to grab a coffee after running this command on a directory with 2.2 million files. :P Had worked like a charm when I came back, 350.000 remained. Thanks! – ArendE Feb 26 '20 at 19:42
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You can use the command find to do this. We can match files with -type f, and match empty files using -size 0. Then we can delete the matches with -delete.

find . -type f -size 0 -delete
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    find . -maxdepth 1 -type f -size 0 -delete This finds the empthy files in the current directory without going into sub-directories. – user7194913 Jan 12 '18 at 8:56
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On Linux, the stat(1) command is useful when you don't need find(1):

(( $(stat -c %s "$filename") )) || rm "$filename"

The stat command here allows us just to get the file size, that's the -c %s (see the man pages for other formats). I am running the stat program and capturing its output, that's the $( ). This output is seen numerically, that's the outer (( )). If zero is given for the size, that is FALSE, so the second part of the OR is executed. Non-zero (non-empty file) will be TRUE, so the rm will not be executed.

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This works for plain BSD so it should be universally compatible with all flavors. Below.e.g in pwd ( . )

find . -size 0 |  xargs rm
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For a non-recursive delete (using du and awk):

rm `du * | awk '$1 == "0" {print $2}'`
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  • -bash: /usr/bin/du: Argument list too long – Antonio Jul 11 '17 at 6:30
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find . -type f -empty -exec rm -f {} \;
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    you can just use the -delete flag - saves an exec. – Yehosef Jul 7 '15 at 9:07

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