-1

I can't figure out on how to strip everything and only keep the site name.

So given:

var url = "https://www.example.it/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?per_page=50&status=publish";

How would I get "example"?

Not familiar with regex.

  • Look at location.host or location.hostname and strip off the domain extension – Taplar Feb 19 at 16:04
  • @Turnip yes I've looked at that answer but it uses host and doesn't give me the name only stackoverflow.com/a/6944772/1018804 – rob.m Feb 19 at 16:06
  • @Taplar as per the other comment, I've looked atusing host as per stackoverflow.com/a/6944772/1018804 but I can't figure out on how to only get the actual name and not the wwww – rob.m Feb 19 at 16:07
  • @rob.m Read the second part of the accepted answer. Then read the second most upvoted answer. – Turnip Feb 19 at 16:07
  • 1
    @Taplar I don't, otherwise I wouldn't have asked – rob.m Feb 19 at 16:07
3

Checkout the URL object: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/URL

var address = "https://www.example.it/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?per_page=50&status=publish";
var url = new URL(address);
var hostname = url.hostname;
var hostTokens = hostname.split('\.');

console.log(hostTokens[1]); // example

console.log({
  hash         : url.hash,
  host         : url.host,
  hostname     : url.hostname,
  href         : url.href,
  origin       : url.origin,
  password     : url.password,
  pathname     : url.pathname,
  port         : url.port,
  protocol     : url.protocol,
  search       : url.search,
  username     : url.username
});
.as-console-wrapper { top: 0; max-height: 100% !important; }

If you need to support sub-domain, you can modify the following function.

var addresses = [ 'https://www.example.it', 'https://mail.example.it' ];

addresses.forEach(address => console.log(parseDomain(address)));

function parseDomain(address) {
  var url = new URL(address);
  var hostTokens = url.hostname.split('\.');
  var result = {
    'Domain' : hostTokens[hostTokens.length - 2],
    'Top-Level Domain' : hostTokens[hostTokens.length - 1]
  };
  if (hostTokens.length > 2 && hostTokens[0] !== 'www') {
    result['Sub-Domain'] = hostTokens[0];
  }
  return result;
}
.as-console-wrapper { top: 0; max-height: 100% !important; }

  • ok am I correct by saying that basically this line var hostTokens = hostname.split('\.'); says get rid of everything before and after the dot? – rob.m Feb 19 at 16:11
  • as others are pointing out, how about a sub domain like www.example.subdomain.com? – rob.m Feb 19 at 16:12
  • No, it means separate the string by its dots. You will get the array: ['www', 'example', 'it'] – Mr. Polywhirl Feb 19 at 16:12
  • @rob.m In your case, you did not ask for some fancy kitchen sink. If you need the example part, grab the hostname, split it, and grab the second token. – Mr. Polywhirl Feb 19 at 16:13
  • 1
    @rob.m In the second example, you can work backwards to get the relevant pieces. – Mr. Polywhirl Feb 19 at 16:23
1

Try this;

function getSiteName() {
  const fullUrlSplit = window.location.host.split(".");
  if (fullUrlSplit[0] !== "www")
    return fullUrlSplit[0];
  return fullUrlSplit[1];   
}

This will work as long as there is no subdomain.

1

You can get the domain by using the combination of URL and split() without using regex, the host name will return www.example.com, so if we apply .split('.') on it then it'll return an array ['www','example','com'], using [1] I am taking the example part only, Hope it helps :)

var url = "https://www.example.it/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?per_page=50&status=publish";
var domain = (new URL(url)).hostname.split('.')[1]
console.log(domain)

For subdomain capture,

var url = "https://www.abc.example.it/wp-json/wp/v2/posts?per_page=50&status=publish";
var subdomain = (new URL(url)).hostname.split('.')[1];
var domain = (new URL(url)).hostname.split('.')[2];
console.log(subdomain, domain)

  • I see, so with hostname you only get the www.example.com, then basically say get of all dots, can you explain what [1] does? – rob.m Feb 19 at 16:10
  • Note that this won't work with a url that contains a subdomain as the split would occur after the subdomain and not the hostname. – braed Feb 19 at 16:10
  • 2
    @rob.m, [1] is accessing the second index of the array that .split returns. Remember that array indexes start at 0, not 1. The array would look like so: [0] => 'www', [1] => 'example', [2] => 'com'. – braed Feb 19 at 16:11
  • 1
    @rob.m Edited again mate :) best of luck – Always Sunny Feb 19 at 16:23
  • 1
    superb! thanks a lot – rob.m Feb 19 at 16:33

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