80

Is there a good way to format a Duration in something like hh:mm:ss, without having to deal with time zones?

I tried this:

DateTime durationDate = DateTime.fromMillisecondsSinceEpoch(0);
String duration = DateFormat('hh:mm:ss').format(durationDate);

But I always get 1 hour to much, in this case it would say 01:00:00

And When I do this:

Duration(milliseconds: 0).toString();

I get this: 0:00:00.000000

1
  • 1
    FYI, your approach didn't work because despite your variable names, you didn't compute durations. durationDate is a DateTime; it's a point in time and therefore is subject to an adjustment from UTC into your local time zone.
    – jamesdlin
    May 27, 2020 at 21:06

13 Answers 13

173

You can use Duration and implement this method:

String _printDuration(Duration duration) {
  String twoDigits(int n) => n.toString().padLeft(2, "0");
  String twoDigitMinutes = twoDigits(duration.inMinutes.remainder(60));
  String twoDigitSeconds = twoDigits(duration.inSeconds.remainder(60));
  return "${twoDigits(duration.inHours)}:$twoDigitMinutes:$twoDigitSeconds";
}

Usage:

final now = Duration(seconds: 30);
print("${_printDuration(now)}");
7
  • Thanks thats some clean dart. Do you know what the problem with my 1st approach was?
    – Jonas
    Feb 19, 2019 at 21:59
  • Just check the doc and you will understand : api.dartlang.org/stable/2.1.0/dart-core/DateTime/… Feb 19, 2019 at 22:01
  • 3
    If you want to make it shorter: String twoDigits(int n) => n >= 10 ? "$n" : "0$n"; Mar 17, 2020 at 2:52
  • 7
    Or just n.toString().padLeft(2, "0"). May 10, 2020 at 17:00
  • 1
    getAudioDuration(Duration duration) { String twoDigits(int n) => n.toString().padLeft(2, "0"); String twoDigitMinutes = twoDigits(duration.inMinutes.remainder(60)); String twoDigitSeconds = twoDigits(duration.inSeconds.remainder(60)); List<String> output = []; if(duration.inHours > 0){ output.add(twoDigits(duration.inHours).toString()); } if(int.parse(twoDigitSeconds) > 0){ output.add(twoDigitMinutes); output.add(twoDigitSeconds); } return output.join(':'); }
    – Kamlesh
    Mar 7, 2021 at 10:16
47

You can start creating a format yourself, come on this one:

String sDuration = "${duration.inHours}:${duration.inMinutes.remainder(60)}:${(duration.inSeconds.remainder(60))}"; 
3
  • 2
    duration.inMinutes is the total number of minutes, for example if the duration is 2 hours the minutes will be 120
    – user425678
    Jul 27, 2019 at 19:36
  • Hey, thanks. I didn't know it was over 60 minutes. I trust your answer. For this I found the remainder method inside the library and introduced it to limit it up to 60.
    – AlexPad
    Jul 29, 2019 at 8:05
  • 13
    Works great but you lose the leading zeros, if you want to keep them just add .toString().padLeft(2, '0') for each concerned data (hours, minutes, seconds)
    – Yann39
    Apr 19, 2020 at 19:37
32

The shortest, most elegant and reliable way to get HH:mm:ss from a Duration is doing:

format(Duration d) => d.toString().split('.').first.padLeft(8, "0");

Example usage:

main() {
  final d1 = Duration(hours: 17, minutes: 3);
  final d2 = Duration(hours: 9, minutes: 2, seconds: 26);
  final d3 = Duration(milliseconds: 0);
  print(format(d1)); // 17:03:00
  print(format(d2)); // 09:02:26
  print(format(d3)); // 00:00:00
}
25

Just a quick implementation.

This will display the Duration in [DD]d:[HH]h:[mm]m:[ss]s format, and will ignore the leading element if it was 0. But seconds will always present.

For example:

1d:2h:3m:4s

2h:3m:4s

3m:4s

4s

0s

  /// Returns a formatted string for the given Duration [d] to be DD:HH:mm:ss
  /// and ignore if 0.
  static String formatDuration(Duration d) {
    var seconds = d.inSeconds;
    final days = seconds~/Duration.secondsPerDay;
    seconds -= days*Duration.secondsPerDay;
    final hours = seconds~/Duration.secondsPerHour;
    seconds -= hours*Duration.secondsPerHour;
    final minutes = seconds~/Duration.secondsPerMinute;
    seconds -= minutes*Duration.secondsPerMinute;

    final List<String> tokens = [];
    if (days != 0) {
      tokens.add('${days}d');
    }
    if (tokens.isNotEmpty || hours != 0){
      tokens.add('${hours}h');
    }
    if (tokens.isNotEmpty || minutes != 0) {
      tokens.add('${minutes}m');
    }
    tokens.add('${seconds}s');

    return tokens.join(':');
  }
1
  • I really like this implementation. I modified it a little bit to display [[[DD:]hh:]mm]:ss with zeros, such as "1:02:03" by replacing the add as tokens.add(addZeroIfFirst(hours, tokens.isEmpty)) and String addZeroIfFirst(int value, bool isFirst) {return sprintf((isFirst) ? "%d": "%02d", [value]);}. This uses sprintf from pub.dev/packages/sprintf.
    – rlat
    Apr 12, 2020 at 13:07
14

Here's another version. It's all preference at this point, but I liked that it was dry and didn't need a function declaration (the wrapping function is obviously optional) though it is definately a bit function chaining heavy.

Compact

String formatTime(double time) {
    Duration duration = Duration(milliseconds: time.round());
    return [duration.inHours, duration.inMinutes, duration.inSeconds].map((seg) => seg.remainder(60).toString().padLeft(2, '0')).join(':');
}

Formatted version

String timeFormatter (double time) {
    Duration duration = Duration(milliseconds: time.round());

    return [duration.inHours, duration.inMinutes, duration.inSeconds]
      .map((seg) => seg.remainder(60).toString().padLeft(2, '0'))
      .join(':');
}
12

Based on @diegoveloper's answer, I made it an extension which is also extendible

extension DurationExtensions on Duration {
  /// Converts the duration into a readable string
  /// 05:15
  String toHoursMinutes() {
    String twoDigitMinutes = _toTwoDigits(this.inMinutes.remainder(60));
    return "${_toTwoDigits(this.inHours)}:$twoDigitMinutes";
  }

  /// Converts the duration into a readable string
  /// 05:15:35
  String toHoursMinutesSeconds() {
    String twoDigitMinutes = _toTwoDigits(this.inMinutes.remainder(60));
    String twoDigitSeconds = _toTwoDigits(this.inSeconds.remainder(60));
    return "${_toTwoDigits(this.inHours)}:$twoDigitMinutes:$twoDigitSeconds";
  }

  String _toTwoDigits(int n) {
    if (n >= 10) return "$n";
    return "0$n";
  }
}

0
7

Define this:

extension on Duration {
  String format() => '$this'.split('.')[0].padLeft(8, '0');
}

Usage:

String time = Duration(seconds: 3661).format(); // 01:01:01
7

Elaborating on other answers, here is an implementation that also formats days:

extension DurationFormatter on Duration {
  /// Returns a day, hour, minute, second string representation of this `Duration`.
  ///
  ///
  /// Returns a string with days, hours, minutes, and seconds in the
  /// following format: `dd:HH:MM:SS`. For example,
  ///
  ///   var d = new Duration(days:19, hours:22, minutes:33);
  ///    d.dayHourMinuteSecondFormatted();  // "19:22:33:00"
  String dayHourMinuteSecondFormatted() {
    this.toString();
    return [
      this.inDays,
      this.inHours.remainder(24),
      this.inMinutes.remainder(60),
      this.inSeconds.remainder(60)
    ].map((seg) {
      return seg.toString().padLeft(2, '0');
    }).join(':');
  }
}

Unfortunately the intl package DateFormat class does not help: it marks the format of a Duration as not implemented:

formatDuration(DateTime reference) → String
NOT YET IMPLEMENTED. [...]
3
format(Duration d) => d.toString().split('.').first.padLeft(8, "0");

main() {
  final d1 = Duration(hours: 17, minutes: 3);
  final d2 = Duration(hours: 9, minutes: 2, seconds: 26);
  final d3 = Duration(milliseconds: 0);
  print(format(d1)); // 17:03:00
  print(format(d2)); // 09:02:26
  print(format(d3)); // 00:00:00
}
1
  • How is this different than Frank Treacy's answer?
    – Csaba Toth
    Feb 28 at 18:39
3

In my opinion the easiest way

String get refactoredDuration{
    return Duration(seconds: duration).toString().split('.')[0];
  }
1

You can use this:

print('${duration.inHours.toString().padLeft(2, '0')}:
${duration.inMinutes.remainder(60).toString().padLeft(2, '0')}:
${duration.inSeconds.remainder(60).toString().padLeft(2, '0')}');
0

I prefer thinking of Millisecond as its own unit, rather than as a subunit of something else. In that sense, it will have values of 0-999, so you're going to want to Pad three instead of two like I have seen with other answers. Here is an implementation:

String format(Duration o) {
   var mil_s = (o.inMilliseconds % 1000).toString().padLeft(3, '0');
   var sec_s = (o.inSeconds % 60).toString().padLeft(2, '0');
   return o.inMinutes.toString() + ' m ' + sec_s + ' s ' + mil_s + ' ms';
}

https://api.dart.dev/dart-core/Duration-class.html

0

You can use this:

 Text(RegExp(r'((^0*[1-9]\d*:)?\d{2}:\d{2})\.\d+$')
      .firstMatch("$duration") ?.group(1) ?? '$duration'),

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