18

For a website I'm trying to get the element before a container to appear in a different color than the element after a container. I want to get the following result:

Example of the result

I've tried this one: CSS :before :after background color. Also a lot of other stuff but it all didn't work out. I ended up with the following code:

.section {
  width: 100%;
}

.section .container {
  background-color: #fff;
  width: 250px;
  margin: 0 auto;
  text-align: center;
}

.section .container::before {
  background-color: red;
  content: ' ';
}

.section .container::after {
  background-color: blue;
  content: ' ';
}

.section .container h1 {
  padding: 10px;
}
<div class="section">
  <div class="container">
    <h1>Hello world.</h1>
  </div>
</div>

The result is just white.

  • 2
    you need to specify some width/height for the pseudo element and make them at least inline-block – Temani Afif Feb 20 at 10:51
  • 1
    You havent given it any height or width so it can't display anything. I think a better solution would be to fix it with flexbox (having 3 containers instead of pseudo elements). – idontknow Feb 20 at 10:52
9

I have updated this using :before and :after, use this below code:

.section {
  width: 100%;
  position: relative;
}

.section .container {
  background-color:#fff;
  width: 250px;
  margin: 0 auto;
  text-align:center;
}
.section .container::before {
    background-color: red;
    content: ' ';
    width: 50%;
    height: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    z-index: -1;
}
.section .container::after {
  background-color: blue;
  content: ' ';
    width: 50%;
    height: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    right: 0;
    z-index: -1;
    top: 0;
}

.section .container h1 {
  padding: 10px;
}
<div class="section">
  <div class="container">
    <h1>Hello world.</h1>
  </div>
</div>

  • 1
    This solution worked for me. Even with the change to gradient background colors. – C. Molendijk Feb 21 at 10:28
23

Here is an easier idea with background coloration:

.section {
  background:linear-gradient(to right,red 50%,blue 0);
}

.section .container {
  background-color: #fff;
  width: 250px;
  margin: 0 auto;
  text-align: center;
}

.section .container h1 {
  padding: 10px;
}
<div class="section">
  <div class="container">
    <h1>Hello world.</h1>
  </div>
</div>

You can still optimize more with only one container and multiple background:

.container {
  background:
   linear-gradient(#fff,#fff) center/250px 100% no-repeat,
   linear-gradient(to right, red 50%, blue 0);
  text-align: center;  
  padding:10px 0;

}

.container h1 {
  margin:0 auto;
  max-width:250px;
}
<div class="container">
  <h1>Hello world.</h1>
</div>

Another way with transparency:

.container {
  background:
   linear-gradient(red,red) left,
   linear-gradient(blue,blue) right;
  background-size:calc(50% - (250px/2)) 100%;
  background-repeat:no-repeat;
  text-align: center;  
  padding:10px 0;
}

.container h1 {
  margin:0 auto;
  max-width:250px;
}

body {
 background:pink;
}
<div class="container">
   <h1>Hello world.</h1>
</div>

Another syntax for the transparent one:

.container {
  background:
   linear-gradient(to right,
    red calc(50% - (250px/2) - 1px),transparent calc(50% - (250px/2)),
    transparent calc(50% + (250px/2)),blue calc(50% + (250px/2) + 1px));
  text-align: center;  
  padding:10px 0;
}

.container h1 {
  margin:0 auto;
  max-width:250px;
}

body {
 background:pink;
}
<div class="container">
   <h1>Hello world.</h1>
</div>

  • Gradients have some serous drawbacks regarding scaling the middle section that using before and after avoids, but the simplicity advantage is really nice. – The Nate Feb 20 at 19:40
  • 1
    @TheNate there is no scaling drawbacks since it's a background ;) you can scale the middle one like you want since it has a white background and it will simply cover the gradient (first and second example) and the third example is an alternative to have transparency which was a plus. – Temani Afif Feb 20 at 19:55
  • @TheNate also note that the pseudo element is doing exactly the same as my first example since each one is taking half the height and the white background of the h1 is hidding the middle part .. I simply did the same with a gradient (half color in each side) – Temani Afif Feb 20 at 20:05
  • @TemaniAfif Here center/250px should be exactly same as h1's max-width:250px; ? And also what does center/250px do? – VirenPanchal Feb 20 at 20:31
  • 1
    @TemaniAfif Thank you very much for your explanation. Finally I got it how it worked. It's the easiest solution. – VirenPanchal Feb 20 at 20:45
1

.section {
  width: 100%;
  position:relative;
}

.section .container {
  background-color:#fff;
  width: 250px;
  margin: 0 auto;
  text-align:center;
}
.section:after,.section:before{position:absolute; height:100%; width:50%; top:0;} 
.section:before {
  background-color: red;
  content: ' ';
  left:0;
}
.container{ background:#fff; position:relative; z-index:111;}
.section:after {
  background-color: blue;
  content: ' ';
  right:0
}

.section .container h1 {
  padding: 10px;
}
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>

  <head>
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="style.css">
    <script src="script.js"></script>
  </head>

  <body>
    <div class="section">
      <div class="container">
        <h1>Hello world.</h1>
      </div>
    </div>
  </body>

</html>

1

If you don't want to limit the text to be 250 you could provide an inner <span /> tag, controlling the white-space with padding and ( on smaller screens ) the blue and red colors with margin. I believe this is probably more of a diverse solution than previously provided ones.

h1 {
  position: relative;
  text-align: center;
  color: #000;
  background-color: #00F;
}

h1 > span {
  position: relative;
  display: inline-block;
  padding: 20px; /* How much white-space on the sides */
  margin: 0 20px; /* How much blue and red we want to show on smaller screens when the text tightens up */
  background-color: #fff;
}

h1:before {
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  width: 50%;
  height: 100%;
  background-color: #F00;
}
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>

  <head>
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="style.css">
    <script src="script.js"></script>
  </head>

  <body>
    <div class="section">
      <div class="container">
        <h1><span>Hello world.</span></h1>
      </div>
    </div>
  </body>

</html>

1

If the width of the heading is fixed (250px in your example) then you can get rid of the wrapper div and use padding + linear gradient:

h1 {
  padding: 10px calc(50% - 250px / 2);
  width: 250px;
  text-align: center;
  background-image: linear-gradient(to right
    , red calc(50% - 250px / 2)
    , white calc(50% - 250px / 2)
    , white calc(50% + 250px / 2)
    , blue calc(50% + 250px / 2)
  );
}
<div class="section">
  <div class="container">
    <h1>Hello world</h1>
    <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.</p>
    <p>Donec lacinia ante id nisi ultricies dictum.</p>
    <h1>Hello again</h1>
    <p>Proin rutrum mollis lorem ac hendrerit.</p>
    <p>Nunc laoreet odio non rhoncus sodales.</p>
  </div>
</div>

0

You could use flex to accomplish this.

By making the container a flex element, and then giving the before and after elements a flex of 1, it automatically centers the h1

.section {
}

.section .container {
    display: flex;
}
.section .container::before {
    content: ' ';
    background-color: red;
    flex: 1;
}
.section .container::after {
    content: ' ';
    background-color: blue;
    flex: 1;
}

.section .container h1 {
  background-color:#fff;
  padding: 10px;
  width: 250px;
  text-align: center;
}
<div class="section">
  <div class="container">
    <h1>Hello world.</h1>
  </div>
</div>

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