8

I get a performance hit to deepcopy once I import an unrelated package, CSV. How can I fix this?

import BenchmarkTools
mutable struct GameState
    gameScore::Vector{Int64}
    setScore::Vector{Int64}
    matchScore::Vector{Int64}
    serve::Int64
end
BenchmarkTools.@benchmark deepcopy(GameState([0,0],[0,0],[0,0],-1))

BenchmarkTools.Trial: 
  memory estimate:  1.02 KiB
  allocs estimate:  10
  --------------
  minimum time:     1.585 μs (0.00% GC)
  median time:      1.678 μs (0.00% GC)
  mean time:        2.519 μs (27.10% GC)
  maximum time:     5.206 ms (99.88% GC)
  --------------
  samples:          10000
  evals/sample:     10

import CSV

BenchmarkTools.@benchmark deepcopy(GameState([0,0],[0,0],[0,0],-1))

BenchmarkTools.Trial: 
  memory estimate:  1.02 KiB
  allocs estimate:  10
  --------------
  minimum time:     6.709 μs (0.00% GC)
  median time:      7.264 μs (0.00% GC)
  mean time:        9.122 μs (18.00% GC)
  maximum time:     13.289 ms (99.87% GC)
  --------------
  samples:          10000
  evals/sample:     5

UPDATE: Code for suggested solution

import Base:deepcopy
function deepcopy(x::GameState)
    return GameState([x.gameScore[1], x.gameScore[2]], [x.setScore[1], x.setScore[2]], [x.matchScore[1], x.matchScore[2]],x.serve)
end

BenchmarkTools.@benchmark deepcopy(GameState([0,0],[0,0],[0,0],-1))
BenchmarkTools.Trial: 
  memory estimate:  672 bytes
  allocs estimate:  8
  --------------
  minimum time:     184.436 ns (0.00% GC)
  median time:      199.305 ns (0.00% GC)
  mean time:        256.366 ns (21.29% GC)
  maximum time:     102.345 μs (99.52% GC)
  --------------
  samples:          10000
  evals/sample:     656
6
  • 2
    Please don't post code as images, it cannot be copied this way! – alex Feb 20 '19 at 14:55
  • 1
    I am not familiar with Julia, but I'd run each of those timings in a loop, say a 100 times, to get an average time of execution. – alex Feb 20 '19 at 15:09
  • 1
    @alex good point, I used a benchmarking tool, same situation; also looked at the non-parallelized version, and I still get hit – Gabi Feb 20 '19 at 15:30
  • 1
    Could you try importing other packages? Is it only the CSV causing the slowdowns? – alex Feb 20 '19 at 16:34
  • 1
    @alex Good tip, thanks! Yes and no: it seems that specifying the types neutralizes the impact of some packages, but not of this one – Gabi Feb 21 '19 at 10:39
10

There are at least two possibilities:

  • Something in your code requires run-time dispatch. Importing CSV adds new methods, thus making the method tables for one or more of your key functions longer. Since run-time dispatch then has more possibilities to evaluate, it makes it slower. Solution: make sure your code is "type stable" (inferrable) wherever possible, then Julia won't need to perform run-time dispatch. See the Performance tips page to get started.
  • Something in CSV is doing type-piracy, and its implementation is slowing you down.

I would place my bets on the former. Use ProfileView.jl to easily detect run-time dispatch graphically. If you see a lot of red bars on top when you profile rungame, then you know you've found the source of the problems. Aside from the interaction with CSV, eliminating those red bars might give you huge improvements in performance.

6
  • 3
    Awesome, that really helped locate the culprit. It seems it massively slows down deepcopy. I've now updated the code in the question, so now it has no other dependencies so everything is fully visible. The question is -- how do I fix this slowdown? :) – Gabi Feb 21 '19 at 10:41
  • 1
    interestingly, deepcopy doesn't appear once in CSV – Michael K. Borregaard Feb 21 '19 at 23:14
  • 1
    deepcopy heavily uses dynamic dispatch, so try to avoid it (e.g. write your own copy function for the specific types). – Simon Byrne Feb 21 '19 at 23:36
  • 2
    I don't think its fair to say that dynamic dispatch is Julia's key feature. In fact, one way to think about Julia is that it allows static dispatch, while keeping a dynamic feel to the language. This is enabled via type inference and multiple-dispatch (is that what you were thinking of?). Dynamic dispatch is always going to be slow, and should be avoided in perf critical code (that is what the rules about type stability boil down to). And deepcopy is unfortunately necessarily type unstable. But the good news is that Julia already has the tools for you to understand and fix these cases. – aviks Feb 22 '19 at 4:00
  • 2
    Plus, we have an awesome community that can make your code 8 times faster in a few hours :) – aviks Feb 22 '19 at 4:02

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