2

I just discovered the following construct in our codebase (simplified in the example):

class SomeClass
{
  public:
    void setKeepGoing(bool b) { m_keepGoing = b; }
    void setDoAdditionalStuff(bool b) { m_doAdditionalStuff = b; }
    void someLoop()
    {
        while(m_keepGoing) 
        {
            //Do something
            bool doMore = m_doAdditionalStuff;
            if (doMore)
                //Do more things
        }  
    }

  private:
    bool m_keepGoing;
    bool m_doAdditionalStuff;
}

There are multiple threads, one calling someLoop() while the others call setKeepGoing() and/or setDoAdditionalStuff().

Now my sinking gut feeling is that this is horribly thread-unsafe. The compiler may very well optimize away reading m_doAdditionalStuff inside the loop (as it is not changed there) and even m_keepGoing (as that too is not changed there) effectively resulting in code acting like:

void someLoop()
{
    if (!m_keepGoing)
        return;
    bool doMore = m_doAdditionalStuff;
    while(true) 
    {
        //Do something
        if (doMore)
            //Do more things
    }  
}

Am I correct in my suspicions?

  • 1
    Your feeling is well-founded. Unless there is some unstated underpinning reason not to do so, a condvar+mutex architecture would probably do what you need, and do so in a process-friendly manner rather than a hand-rolled spinloop. – WhozCraig Feb 20 at 16:29
5

Your suspicions are correct. You cannot write and read from the same variable in multiple threads without some sort of synchronization mechanism. Doing so is a data race and is undefined behavior.

What you can do in this case is to use a std::atomic<bool> for m_keepGoing and m_doAdditionalStuff so that you will have synchronization.

  • Thank you very much for you help – CharonX Feb 21 at 7:59
5

If you have readers and writers (or multiple writers; anything but only readers) accessing the same variable in multiple threads you need for that variable to be atomic or use a lock (or other synchronization primitive). Otherwise you have a data race and your program has Undefined Behaviour.

  • Thank you very much for you help – CharonX Feb 21 at 7:59
2

Yes, this is a race condition. And yes, this is the code I see in many examples, and the truth is, it works on modern Intel architecture with current compilers - simply because strong memory guarantees by Intel prevent any issues of reading torn or cached value, and compilers usually can't optimize away this access in any complicated enough code.

Now, a common suggestion to fix the problem in an easiest way would be to replace bool flag with std::atomic<bool>. Unfortunately, in practice it might be easier said, than done. Adding atomic members to the class make them non-copyable and non-copy constructible, so default assignment and copy construction won't work any more. This is a nuisance which can lead to a lot of extra code written, which than will have to be supported. A further tricks might be required to ease this burden.

2

If there are multiple writer threads those access the same instance, then you got a problem of data overridden (adapt thread synchronization techniques for e.g. access to instance/variable should be atomic).

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