6

In Ruby, I have this class:


class Position
  attr_reader :x, :y
  def initialize(x, y)
      @x, @y = x, y
  end
end
What I want to do is to access x and y variables using the symbol, something like this:
axis = :x
pos = Position.new(5,6)
 #one way:
pos.axis # 5 (pos.x)
 #other way:
pos.get(axis) # 5 (pos.x)

Thanks to this question I've found with this code, I can achieve the second behavior.

#...
class Position
  def get(var)
    instance_variable_get(("@#{var}").intern)
  end
end
But it seems ugly and inefficient (especially converting symbol to string and back to symbol). Is there a better way?

  • 1
    x and y are not variables, but methods :-) – karatedog Mar 29 '11 at 22:54
  • Right, I am still getting used to it. :) – jnv Mar 30 '11 at 9:11
2

Here are ways to do both techniques. Assuming we already have your class definition,

position = Position.new(1, 2)
axis = :x
position.send axis #=> 1
axis = :y
position.send axis #=> 2

The Object#send method accepts at least a symbol representing the name of the method to call, and call it. You can also pass arguments to the method after the name and a block, too.

The second way to do this (using your Position#get method) is

class Position
  def get(axis)
    send axis
  end
end

position = Position.new(1, 2)
axis = :x
position.get axis #=> 1
axis = :y
position.get axis #=> 2

I recommend this way because it encapsulates the technique for getting the values. Should you need to change it later, you don't need to change all the code that uses Position.

8

Easy, use the send method

class Position
  attr_reader :x, :y

  def initialize(x, y)
    @x, @y = x, y
  end
end
 => nil 

pos = Position.new(5,5)
 => #<Position:0x0000010103d660 @x=5, @y=5> 

axis = :x
 => :x 

pos.send axis
 => 5 
  • 1
    There is no need to convert axis to string. axis is a Symbol, and in .send, the method name must be passed as a Symbol. => pos.send(axis) – karatedog Mar 29 '11 at 22:48
  • @karatedog Updated – Wes Mar 29 '11 at 23:55
  • This did the job, thank you! – jnv Mar 30 '11 at 9:10
  • 1
    This doesn't actually access the instance variable, it just calls the accessor. – David Moles May 21 '15 at 21:35

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