23

Is there a built-in way to delete a value from an array, based on a block condition returning true, and return the value that was deleted?

This is a simplified version of what I'm trying to do, but it seems like there has to be a better way:

array = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]

index = array.index {|v| v == 5} # returns index if block is true

value = array.delete_at(index) # deletes and returns element at index

value is then 5

4
  • Why are you deleting an item and then wanting its value? Mar 30, 2011 at 21:55
  • It was more of a curiosity I had than anything. Array has a delete method which deletes a value and returns it, and a delete_if method that takes a block and removes the values, but does not return the removed values. It just seemed weird that there wasn't a method that did both. Mar 31, 2011 at 3:01
  • This is a valid concern. Think of a large array that has to be compared against certain data but only once. Removing items from the array speeds up this process a lot.
    – three
    Jan 24, 2014 at 7:00
  • 1
    My use case: I am slowly picking items out of a list. Each pass I need to run through the list until I find the right candidate, and then I want to remove it from the list.
    – Phrogz
    Jun 5, 2014 at 15:51

6 Answers 6

26

You can't update the array in place and get a return of a different set of values that are deleted. You can do the following using delete_if to remove values and capture the ones removed by the logic in the block:

reject = []
 => [] 
content = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]
 => [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9] 
content.delete_if {|v| reject << v if v > 5}
 => [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] 
reject
 => [6, 7, 8, 9] 
content
 => [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] 
3
  • 1
    This doesn't return the object that was deleted. You could do a difference between the arrays, but this may not be desirable/efficient.
    – Mike Lewis
    Mar 30, 2011 at 0:37
  • @mike Updated to be more explicit
    – Wes
    Mar 30, 2011 at 0:45
  • 7
    Or you could use Enumerable#partition which is meant to do nearly just that.
    – muichkine
    Jun 3, 2013 at 10:30
4

Do you really need to delete items from the original array or are you really just trying to split it into two pieces based on some condition? If the latter, then:

accepted = [ ]
rejected = [ ]
original.each { |e| (want_this_one(e) ? accepted : rejected).push(e) }

or

parts = original.inject({ :accepted => [ ], :rejected => [ ] }) do |accumulator, e|
  if(want_this_one(e))
    accumulator[:accepted].push(e)
  else
    accumulator[:rejected].push(e)
  end
  accumulator
end

And then a simple method wrapper to make it easy to supply a block:

def categorize(array)
  categories = array.inject({ :accepted => [ ], :rejected => [ ] }) do |accumulator, e|
    if(yield e)
      accumulator[:accepted].push(e)
    else
      accumulator[:rejected].push(e)
    end
    accumulator
  end
  return categories[:accepted], categories[:rejected]
end

kept, deleted = categorize([1, 2, 3, 4, 5]) { |n| n % 2 == 0 }
# kept    = [2, 4]
# deleted = [1, 3, 5]

Or you could just use Enumerable#partition to split the array into two pieces.

If you really need to modify the array in-place then this version of Wes's should do the trick:

def slice_out(array)
  dead = [ ]
  array.delete_if do |e|
    if(yield e)
      dead.push(e)
      true
    else
      false  
    end
  end
  dead
end

a = [1,2,3,4]
x = slice_out(a) { |n| n % 2 == 0 }
# a == [1, 3]
# x == [2, 4]
2
  • Your categorize method resembles very much to ruby-doc.org/core/classes/Enumerable.html#M001496 ;) Mar 30, 2011 at 5:53
  • @Mladen: Thanks, I didn't know about partition. I think my categorize is functionally equivalent to partition so I'll add a note; I'll leave categorize there as I think it might give someone a start on an easy generalization of partition (i.e. the block could return a hash key rather than a boolean). Mar 30, 2011 at 6:41
3

Array#extract (Rails 6+)

If you are using Rails, then starting from version 6, there is a method Array#extract!, which does almost what you need.

It removes and returns the elements for which the block returns a true value and modifies the original array.

Please, have a look at the following example:

array = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

values = array.extract! { |value| value == 5 }

# array
# => [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

# values
# => [5]
2

You can use partition. Obviously the block example here doesn't make complete sense but returns both deleted items and left over.

a = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]
b, a = a.partition { |x| [1,3,5].include?(x) }

b # [1, 3, 5]
a # [2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]
0

This won't work for every use-case, but if you are extracting items one-at-a-time from an array according to some condition, you could do this:

array = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
indexed_array = array.index_by { |a| a }  # or whatever your condition is
item = indexed_array.delete(5)
array = indexed_array.values
1
-5

you can use values_at eg

>> array = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
>> array.values_at(5)
=> [6]
1
  • 2
    Thanks, but this doesn't delete the value or take a block, so it won't work for what I'm trying to do. Mar 29, 2011 at 23:58

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