4

How to get an object from a closure, that's confusion with me, here is the question:

var o = function () {
   var person = {
       name: 'jonathan',
       age: 24
   }
   return {
       run: function (key) {
           return person[key]
       }
   } 
}

question: How do i get original person object without changing the source code.

4
10

var o = function() {
  var person = {
    name: 'jonathan',
    age: 24
  }
  return {
    run: function(key) {
      return person[key]
    }
  }
}

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, "self", {
  get() {
    return this;
  }
});

console.log(o().run("self")); // logs the object

This works as all objects inherit the Object.prototype, therefore you can insert a getter to it, which has access to the object through this, then you can use the exposed run method to execute that getter.

11
  • Seems I'm good at interview questions :) – Jonas Wilms Feb 21 '19 at 13:37
  • 2
    @adiga it depends how you "source code". If you just mean "don't change the code that defines the closure" i.e., what's quoted in the OP, then defining a getter works. If it means without changing ANY code, then it's not possible by definition because you are not allowed to change anything at all. – VLAZ Feb 21 '19 at 13:41
  • I'd use a Symbol instead of "self" so I don't break any object which could have "self" (or any other key) defined. – Dmitry Feb 21 '19 at 13:45
  • (@VLAZ I wasn't being serious) – adiga Feb 21 '19 at 13:45
  • @dmitry I wouldn't use this code at all. In reality no one would have a function o that returns keys of a person? This is constructed code meant to challenge interviewies. – Jonas Wilms Feb 21 '19 at 13:48
2

You can get the keys by running

o().run("<keyname>"))

Like that:

var o = function () {
   var person = {
       name: 'jonathan',
       age: 24
   }
   return {
       run: function (key) {
           return person[key]
       }
   } 
}

console.log(o().run("name"));
console.log(o().run("age"));

11
  • That's meaningless if you don't know the property names. – Nisarg Feb 21 '19 at 13:28
  • @NisargShah I can look at the code and see the property names, or maybe they are documented... lol – epascarello Feb 21 '19 at 13:29
  • @NisargShah As far as I know it would be impossible to return the whole person object without changing the code. And since OP said that was an interview question, I believe this is the way he was supposed to do it. – NullDev Feb 21 '19 at 13:30
  • @epascarello I'm pretty sure that the interviewer is not expecting that answer. :) The expected answer would be "You can't". – Nisarg Feb 21 '19 at 13:30
  • 2
    All three answers "can't", "read props", and "define/eval" all show the basic concept that they know that the person is not accessible directly. For no, I would follow up with another answer on how can you "recreate" with the available method. For the method one, I would have followed up with why can't you get "person" directly just so I hear the words I think they know. And for the other one.... that guy is crazy. – epascarello Feb 21 '19 at 13:51
1

Could just toString the function, pull out the part you need, and eval it to get it as an object. This is pretty fragile though so getting it to work for different cases could be tough.

var o = function () {
   var person = {
       name: 'jonathan',
       age: 24
   }
   return {
       run: function (key) {
           return person[key]
       }
   } 
}

var person = eval('(' + o.toString().substr(30, 46) + ')')

console.log(person)

5
  • 3
    Disclaimer, this is a super ugly hack and using it in production code is not advisable. It might have adverse effect on your health. From your coworkers hitting you. – VLAZ Feb 21 '19 at 13:34
  • I mean it's terrible but shows you can think outside the box. Definitely not something I'd use in production. :P – James Coyle Feb 21 '19 at 13:37
  • To be fair, this interview question is pretty bad. So, as they say - ask stupid questions, get stupid answers. – VLAZ Feb 21 '19 at 13:39
  • Exactly. In what situation would you need to get this without being able to change the source code? You should never need to access something that is in a closure from outside of it. – James Coyle Feb 21 '19 at 13:41
  • you know what - I actually thought of a good reason to. Well, not the best, to be honest - it's still relatively bad all things considered but here it goes - testing. If you want to make a spy for unit testing purpose you might need to "break into" a closure. It's still better to 1. use a dedicated library 2. write unit-testable code, however, this is still a more legitimate reason I can think of. Everything else is related to bad architecture, bad design, bad coding, or multiple of these. – VLAZ Feb 21 '19 at 14:37
-2

o().run("name") It will be return "jonathan".

-2

Simply you can make this

<script type="text/javascript">
 var o = function () {
  var person = {
   name: 'jonathan',
   age: 24
  }
  return {
   run: function (key) {
       return person[key]
   }
  } 
 }
let a = new o;
alert(a.run('name'));
</script>

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