17

On the TypeScript's Decorator reference page there is a code snipped that illustrates how to override the constructor with class decorator:

function classDecorator<T extends {new(...args:any[]):{}}>(constructor:T) {
    return class extends constructor {
        newProperty = "new property";
        hello = "override";
    }
}

@classDecorator
class Greeter {
    property = "property";
    hello: string;
    constructor(m: string) {
        this.hello = m;
    }
}

console.log(new Greeter("world"));

and in logs:

class_1 {
  property: 'property',
  hello: 'override',
  newProperty: 'new property' }

So far so good. BUT trying to access newProperty by dot notation fails with:

Property 'newProperty' does not exist on type 'Greeter'.ts(2339)

error and it's not listed in hints in VS Code. One can access it by bracket notation but TS warns that

Element implicitly has an 'any' type because type 'Greeter' has no index signature.ts(7017)

Am I missing something? How to implement adding new properties via Decorators in type-safe way? I'd like to have normal compiler support just like with regular class members.

3 Answers 3

21

Decorators by design can't change the type of a class. This is stil in discussion and it appears until the decorator proposal is finalized the team will not change the behavior. You can use mixins for this task (read about mixins in ts)

Using mixins the code would look something like:

function classDecorator<T extends { new(...args: any[]): {} }>(constructor: T) {
    return class extends constructor {
        newProperty = "new property";
        hello = "override";
    }
}

const Greeter = classDecorator(class {
    property = "property";
    hello: string;
    constructor(m: string) {
        this.hello = m;
    }
});
type Greeter = InstanceType<typeof Greeter> // have the instance type just as if we were to declare a class

console.log(new Greeter("world").newProperty);
4
  • 1
    Why "by design"? It seems that decorators would be a perfect way of introducing mixin into the class.
    – Forseti
    Feb 21, 2019 at 18:08
  • I can lookup the GitHub issue, it just was not implemented to allow this and is was a deliberate decision not to do so. Feb 21, 2019 at 18:10
  • 1
    @Forseti this is one open issue around it, the discussion is long but this comment seems relevant: github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/…, so more a not yet implemented kind of issue Feb 21, 2019 at 18:12
  • This pattern is commonly referred to as higher order classes. If I were being obscenely pedantic I would point out that the thing you made isn't actually a decorator, but the syntax is so close who cares amirite? Dec 8, 2023 at 3:41
8
function classDecorator<T extends { new(...args: any[]): {} }>(constructor: T) {
    return class extends constructor {
        newProperty = "new property";
        hello = "override";
    }
}
interface classInterface {
    newProperty: string;
    hello: string;
}

//trick
interface Greeter extends classInterface { };

@classDecorator
class Greeter {
    property = "property";
    hello: string;
    constructor(m: string) {
        this.hello = m;
    }
}
const b = new Greeter();
console.log(b.newProperty);

Seems we can use interface trick to solve the problem. Reference of the trick: https://stackoverflow.com/a/52373394/4831179

2
  • 7
    This undermines why we use the decorator in the first place. The objective of using the decorator is not having to extend the class. If not, we could just extend to a class that implemented those new properties and call super() in the constructor of Greter.. Apr 21, 2020 at 7:24
  • 1
    @JaviMarzán That's currently the only option, because Class Decorator Mutations are not allowed. See following Github Issue: github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/4881 The trick of blackmiaool can also be found in the comments.
    – DeusProx
    Jul 29, 2020 at 19:49
-2

Not a direct solution but a workaround that avoids the limiation of decorators: In some cases it's possible to replace the decorator with a plain class that will properly inherit types.

class ClassDecorator {
        newProperty = "new property";
        hello = "override";
}

class Greeter extends ClassDecorator {
    property = "property";
    hello: string;
    constructor(m: string) {
        this.hello = m;
    }
}

console.log(new Greeter("world"));

1
  • I think @Forseti know how to do it in inheritance way. The question is about decorators
    – Franky238
    Mar 27, 2023 at 8:17

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