1

I have a base class that takes two arguments in its constructor:

public class BaseClass {
    public BaseClass(string key, object value) { ... }
}

My derived class is constructed differently, using a single complex argument that I can then split into the base class arguments.

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass {
    public DerivedClass (string keyValuePair)
        : BaseClass( SomethingExpensive(keyValuePair).Key,
                     SomethingExpensive(keyValuePair).Value) { }

    private static KeyValuePair<string,object> SomethingExpensive(string input) { 
         // Do expensive things
         return new KeyValuePair<string,object>(derivedKey, derivedValue);
    }    
}

Given that I have no control over BaseClass and cannot give it a new constructor, I'm trying to find any way that I can pass along those arguments without calling SomethingExpensive twice.


I thought about using an out parameter to generate a new identifier for the additional constructor arguments during the first invocation:

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass {
    public DerivedClass (string keyValuePair)
        : BaseClass( SomethingExpensive(keyValuePair, out object _value), _value) { }

    private static string SomethingExpensive(string input, out object value) { 
         // Do expensive things
         value = derivedValue;
         return derivedKey;
    }    
}

But this is rejected in the current framework with the error:

Error CS8107 Feature 'declaration of expression variables in member initializers and queries' is not available in C# 7.0. Please use language version 7.3 or greater.

Any alternative ideas?

  • How is the keyValuePair delimited in the string? You could use string.Split() to get the key and value and pass it to the base constructor. – Lews Therin Feb 21 at 19:59
  • @LewsTherin - If it helps with the analogy, imagine keyValuePair is a heavily encrypted string that contains "key:value" once decrypted, but takes roughly 10 seconds to decrypt. Can you come up with an approach to call the base constructor in 10 seconds rather than 20 seconds? – Alain Feb 21 at 20:06
1

I can think of 2 separate approaches, albeit not outright solutions:

  1. You can cache the result of parsing the key value pair, so that the 2nd call is not expensive
  2. You can use a has-a rather than a is-a relationship model. So that the base class is not derived, but a contained object, wrapped and exposed by the same interface.

Hope this helps.

  • Good suggestions thanks. "is-a" is definitely required in my particular case (e.g. I don't want to have to re-implement all base class interfaces as a pass-through) but the caching approach is practical, if not elegant. – Alain Feb 21 at 20:04
1

Just add an adapter class between BaseClass and DerivedClass

public class BaseClass {
    public BaseClass(string key, object value) { ... }
}

public class AdapterClass : BaseClass {
    public AdapterClass (SomethingExpensive se) : BaseClass(se.key, se.value) { ... }
}

public class DerivedClass : AdapterClass{
    public DerivedClass (string keyValuePair) : AdapterClass(SomethingExpensive(keyValuePair)) { }

    private static KeyValuePair<string,object> SomethingExpensive(string input) { 
        // Do expensive things
        return new KeyValuePair<string,object>(derivedKey, derivedValue);
    }    
}
  • 1
    Thanks for the thought. We can actually avoid the need for an intermediate class completely just by having a second private constructor in the DerivedClass. Wouldn't have thought of it without this suggestion though, so thanks! – Alain Feb 21 at 20:19
1

Inspired by @alex's solution, but without the need for an additional class:

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass {
    public DerivedClass (string keyValuePair)
        : this(SomethingExpensive(keyValuePair)) { }

    private DerivedClass (Tuple<string,object> arguments)
        : BaseClass(arguments.Item1, arguments.Item2)

    private static Tuple<string,object> SomethingExpensive(string input) { 
         // Do expensive things
         return Tuple.Create(derivedKey, derivedValue);
    }    
}

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