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I have two classes, Person and Event. Multiple people can sign up for an event and is coded as a foreign key list. My question is what is the correct way of adding an additional variable such as a paid bool or something? I imagine I will have to make a separate class with a foreign key link on both Person and Event but I wanted to make sure there wasn't some fancy way of adding an additional property.

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  • 1
    Can a single person sign up for multiple events? – rad Feb 21 '19 at 21:10
2

If Person have many events then i would have structure my person class like below

public class Person
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    // each person have many events
    public List<EventRelation> Events { get; set; }
}

public class EventRelation
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public Events Event { get; set; }

    // Person Id forgen Key
    public int Person_Id { get; set; }

    // Events Id forgen Key
    public int Event_Id { get; set; }
}


public class Events
{
    public int Id { get; set; }

    public string EventType { get; set; }

}
5
  • It is many to many. A person can attend many events and events can have many people. I also need to add a property describing the relationship. For example a date a person registered for an event. – Dane Looman Feb 21 '19 at 21:23
  • I see, look at my answer agen i edited it. You need to think only about person when you select the person it will containe all the information needed. – Alen.Toma Feb 21 '19 at 21:28
  • Thank you Alen. This was how I had planned to do it but I wanted to make sure there wasn't some other fancy way to do it. – Dane Looman Feb 21 '19 at 21:33
  • It's a shame that many-to-many associations still need an entity class in EF Core. Hope that changes soon! – Matt Tester Feb 21 '19 at 22:10
  • 1
    Well i have build a library that could handle those kind of classes with ease :) check it out github.com/AlenToma/EntityWorker.Core/blob/master/Documentation/… – Alen.Toma Feb 21 '19 at 22:11
1

Yes, you are doing it the right way. Since it's an N to N relationship, it needs a joining entity as you specified. The joining entity would have two primary (foreign key) properties including PersonId and EventId and other optional properties (in your case Paid).

Update:

Regarding looking for a fancy way, the answer is No. When designing a database, you are limited to the data model you are using which is relational data model here. EF and other kinds of ORMs are just tools for communications between the app and database.
However, if you define one foreign key in Person class with the type of Collection<Event> and another in Event class with the type of Collection<Person>, entity framework will automatically create the joining table with the two foreign keys. But it's not what you desire, because you need to add more properties to the joining table.

1
  • Thanks! I just wasn't sure if there was some fancy way I didn't know about to add this. – Dane Looman Feb 21 '19 at 21:17
0

you can always add new properties into your class, execute migration script and then update database script in order to synchronise Entities with Database.

class Person
{
   public int Id {get; set;}
}

suppose you add DateOfBirth

class Person
{
   public int Id {get; set;}
   public DateTime DateOfBirth {get; set;}
}

then

dotnet add migration 'BirthDate'
dotnet ef database update
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  • Let me clarify - if this were a SQL table I would have a person table, an event table, then a joining table with just PeopleIDs, EventIDs, and a bool for if they paid for that event. Does that make sense? If I add the bool to person it just for the person and if I add it to the event it won't be for each person. – Dane Looman Feb 21 '19 at 21:10
  • It is very hard to understand what you are trying to tell. I suspect that you are talking about BridgeTables. You can add bridgeTable in between Person and Event classes such as PersonEvents and you can add whatever property you want in it – Derviş Kayımbaşıoğlu Feb 21 '19 at 21:12

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