10

I would like to create a class which takes std::function and allow to handle specified exceptions but I'm not sure if it is possible.

Here is a pseudo draft:

//exception types
template<class... Args>
class CustomExceptionHandler
{
public:
    CustomExceptionHandler(std::function<void()> clb): clb_(std::move(clb)){}

    void ExecuteCallback()
    {
        try
        {
            clb_();
        }
        /*catch specified exception types*/
    }

private:
    std::function<void()> clb_;
};

//usage
CustomExceptionHandler<std::out_of_range, std::overflow_error> handler(clb);
handler.ExecuteCallback();

I don't know how to use a variadic template to grab exception types and use it later. Is it possible?

I guess that tuple may be helpful.

4
  • What do you want to do with the caught exception?
    – geza
    Commented Feb 21, 2019 at 21:08
  • Exception handling is not important here, that example is for learning purposes, I just wonder if it is possible to create such class.
    – Irbis
    Commented Feb 21, 2019 at 21:11
  • This is doable, but real question is why? What is the gain?
    – Marek R
    Commented Feb 21, 2019 at 21:12
  • As I have mentioned that is for learning purposes, but some real scenario may be following: catch some connection exception, wait, and call clb again.
    – Irbis
    Commented Feb 21, 2019 at 21:15

2 Answers 2

10

It's possible! I've made a solution (which you can run here) that expands the parameter pack of exception types into a series of recursive function calls, where each function attempts to catch one type of exception. The innermost recursive call then invokes the callback.

namespace detail {    
    template<typename First>
    void catcher(std::function<void()>& clb){
        try {
            clb(); // invoke the callback directly
        } catch (const First& e){
            // TODO: handle error as needed
            std::cout << "Caught an exception with type \"" << typeid(e).name();
            std::cout << "\" and message \"" << e.what() << "\"\n";
        }
    }
    
    template<typename First, typename Second, typename... Rest>
    void catcher(std::function<void()>& clb){
        try {
            catcher<Second, Rest...>(clb); // invoke the callback inside of other handlers
        } catch (const First& e){
            // TODO: handle error as needed
            std::cout << "Caught an exception with type \"" << typeid(e).name();
            std::cout << "\" and message \"" << e.what() << "\"\n";
        }
    }
}

template<class... Args>
class CustomExceptionHandler
{
public:
    CustomExceptionHandler(std::function<void()> clb): clb_(std::move(clb)){}

    void ExecuteCallback()
    {
        detail::catcher<Args...>(clb_);
    }

private:
    std::function<void()> clb_;
};

int main(){
    
    std::function<void()> clb = [](){
        std::cout << "I'm gonna barf!\n";
        throw std::out_of_range("Yuck");
        //throw std::overflow_error("Ewww");
    };
    
    CustomExceptionHandler<std::out_of_range, std::overflow_error> handler(clb);
    handler.ExecuteCallback();
    
    return 0;
}

Output:

I'm gonna barf!

Caught an exception with type "St12out_of_range" and message "Yuck"

2
  • Could you explain why there is First and Second parameter apart from the Rest ?
    – Irbis
    Commented Feb 21, 2019 at 21:49
  • @Irbis The design is taken from this answer. I believe without the Second parameter, the overload would be ambiguous in the case of single template parameter. Admittedly this design doesn't work for zero template parameters. I'm sure it's fairly simple to fix that though.
    – alter_igel
    Commented Feb 21, 2019 at 22:22
2
template<typename E0, typename ... En>
class ExceptionCatcher
{
public:
    template<typename F>
    void doit(F&& f)
    {
        try 
        {
            ExceptionCatcher<En...> catcher;
            catcher.doit(std::forward<F>(f));
        }
        catch(const E0 &)
        {
            std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << '\n';
        }
    }
};

template<typename E0>
class ExceptionCatcher<E0>
{
public:
    template<typename F>
    void doit(F&& f)
    {
        try 
        {
            f();
        }
        catch(const E0 &)
        {
            std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << '\n';
        }
    }
};

https://wandbox.org/permlink/dAUQtb9RWvMZT4b6

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