1

I have two namespaces:

System.Numerics and UnityEngine

Both have the type Vector3.

So now when ever i want to use it i have to declare which namespace before it. Like this:

protected struct CVN
{
    public Complex h;
    public UnityEngine.Vector2 d;
    public UnityEngine.Vector3 n;
}

Is there any way to define that i only want Vector3 from one namespace so i don't have to always type NameSpaceHere.Vector3 every single time ?

Or am i stuck with the tedious nature of stating the namespace every time. Especially since i only need the Complex type from Numerics its quite annoying.

  • Maybe use Numerics.Complex and using UnityEngine;? – Rafalon Feb 22 at 7:33
  • Well then i have to state Numerics every where i use Complex so that just switches the problem to other type :P – WDUK Feb 22 at 7:34
  • 1
    Where ever you want to user vector2 and vector3 from UnityEngine namespace, you need to declare using Vector2 = UnityEngine.Verctor2; and using Vector3 = UnityEngine.Vector3 at the top of the class file. – Chetan Ranpariya Feb 22 at 7:37
  • 1
    If you were using more than one type from Numerics, and especially if you were using similarly named types from both, I'd have said stick with it despite more typing, just to make it crystal clear which type you mean in each location. (For the benefit of future readers, like yourself in 6 months time) – Damien_The_Unbeliever Feb 22 at 7:51
5

If all you need from System.Numerics is Complex, then:

using UnityEngine;
using Complex = System.Numerics.Complex;

At the top of your file, without using System.Numerics; should do it. This is an alias.

1

You can wrap the using directive of the wanted class in the namespace of your current class rather than putting it outside. Consider this example

namespace System.Numerics
{
    class MyClass
    {
    }
}
namespace UnityEngine
{
    class MyClass
    {
    }
}
using System.Numeric;

namespace ConsoleApplication24
{
    using UnityEngine; // inside the namespace
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            MyClass xx = new MyClass(); // from UnitEngine instead of System.Numeric
        }
    }
}

  • This is interesting, and I didn't know that it had this behaviour. +1 (I had to test it in order to be convinced though ^^) – Rafalon Feb 22 at 7:54

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