-1

i.e. I have 2-step inherited class, and have access only Parent_1 class:

public class Base
{
    public virtual void hello (){}
}

//
public class Parent_1 : Base
{
    public override void hello (){ Print("Hi 1"); }
}

public class Parent_2 : Parent_1
{ 
    public override void hello (){ Print("Hi 2");  xyz =123; } 
}

I don't have access to any code other than Parent_1. I want, when Parent_2's hello is executed, my Parent_1's hello was also fired.

I think there should exist some way, so when Parent_2 is executed, somehow I got notified (event handler or whatever) in Parent_1 , is not that possible? I know xyz is "changed" there, so maybe a "property change observer" ?

  • 1
    Put base.Hello(); in Parent_2's hello method. – mjwills Feb 22 at 11:52
  • _"I don't have access to Parent_2", what you mean? You can't change its code? – SᴇM Feb 22 at 11:55
  • With the information you have given us, the answer is 'No, you can't easily do that'. Depending on the exact details of the types involved, you may be able to write your own ConvertFromParent_2ToParent_1 function, which you can use to create a new Parent_1 from an instance of Parent_2 and then invoke the function on that new instance. It is hard to know whether that is useful to your specific context. – mjwills Feb 22 at 11:58
  • No you can't, of course if your hello method changes something, that you have access to, you can somehow check if changes were made, call hello from Parent_1, but if it is as you have described, you can't without accessing (adding some code) class Parent_2. – SᴇM Feb 22 at 12:01
  • @SeM thanks, all i know is that Parent_2's hello is called when a base property named xyz changes. – T.Todua Feb 22 at 12:11
0

Update

unfortuantely that doesnt help in my case, because I neither control other parts of code, neither main() like executions... I am just writing a module for existing app, which only uses my Parent_1 as intermediate between Parent_2 and Base

You cant and there is no way to do this i know (not even with reflection), Polymorphism in C# actually guarantees that the overridden method will be called unless you tell it to do so in the overridden method with base

Original

If i understand what you are describing.. Overriding wont fire the base method unless you explicitly tell it to do so.

public class Parent_2 : Parent_1
{ 
    public override void hello ()
    { 
       base.hello();
       Print("Hi 2"); 
    }
}

Additional Resources

Polymorphism (C# Programming Guide)

Base classes may define and implement virtual methods, and derived classes can override them, which means they provide their own definition and implementation. At run-time, when client code calls the method, the CLR looks up the run-time type of the object, and invokes that override of the virtual method. Thus in your source code you can call a method on a base class, and cause a derived class's version of the method to be executed.

base (C# Reference)

The base keyword is used to access members of the base class from within a derived class:

  • Call a method on the base class that has been overridden by another method.

  • Specify which base-class constructor should be called when creating instances of the derived class.


public class Base
{
    public virtual void hello()
    {
    }
}

//
public class Parent_1 : Base
{
    public override void hello()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Hi 1");
    }
}

public class Parent_2 : Parent_1
{
    public override void hello()
    {
        base.hello();
        Console.WriteLine("Hi 2");
    }
}

public static void Main()
{
    Parent_1 p = new Parent_2();
    p.hello();
}

Output

Hi 1
Hi 2

Full Demo Here

  • @T.Todua i just demonstrated this with base.hello();.. updated to show this – AAAbbbCCCddd Feb 22 at 12:04
  • @T.Todua updated – AAAbbbCCCddd Feb 22 at 12:14
  • I think another vector could be to monitor a property change? I've updated question. Is that possible way? – T.Todua Feb 22 at 12:23
  • @T.Todua no all this requires that the instantiated class is programmed to do so.. there could be .net injection techniques however this is going to be a lot more complicated – AAAbbbCCCddd Feb 22 at 12:25
0

Well why can't you call base class one using the base keyword

public class Parent_2 : Parent_1
{         
    public override void hello (){ base.hello(); Print("Hi 2"); }        
}

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