29

I have an HTML page where the body tag has CSS padding-left and padding-right applied. I'd like the page footer div to be 100% width of the page though, without the body padding applied. Is there a good/easy way of doing this ?

2
  • You mean footer width = body.width + 10px + 10px? Commented Mar 30, 2011 at 6:49
  • Yeah I could do that with javascript, but I was thinking there was probably a CSS way I was missing too. Commented Mar 30, 2011 at 6:52

7 Answers 7

18

You could apply a negative margin to the inside container to negate the padding

<body style="padding:0 40px">
<div style="width:100%;margin:0 -40px">&nbsp</div>
</body>
4
  • 17
    does not work if the elements need to be responsive (%-width) Commented May 16, 2013 at 20:14
  • 7
    For posterity.... the normal way this is achieved is position: absolute; right: 0; left: 0;
    – Drenai
    Commented Jan 18, 2018 at 1:05
  • @Drenai it works but, if inside a td, it gets the width of the entire tr, instead of my td. Commented Feb 19, 2020 at 14:25
  • for me this worked stackoverflow.com/a/30894183/5864034
    – Ali Samie
    Commented Apr 17, 2023 at 9:38
7

Another alternative way can be this : using calc

<div class="parent"> <!--/ Parent div with padding left right -->
    <div class="child">i'm Child div</div>
</body>

CSS

.parent{
   padding:0 20px;
}
.child{
    width:-moz-calc(100% - 40px); <!--/ similar with other browser prefixes -->
    width:calc(100% - 40px);
}
6

If you give the footer a left and right margin that is a negative amount, of equal size to the padding of the body, then it will counter the body's padding.

body {
    padding-left:10px;
    padding-right:10px;
}
.footer {
    margin-left:-10px;
    margin-right:-10px;
}
3

After some playing around, 'width: inherit;' solved it for me:

#parent-container {
  width: 400px; 
  padding: 0 15px;
}

#inner-div {
  width: inherit;
  margin: 0 -15px;
}
0
3

There is another way of solving this using calc on the parent element. That way, both the padding and the calc are in the same CSS class, and if the padding has to be modified you will see more easily that the calc formula has to be modified too than if it lies in the child element CSS class.

html,
body {
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  padding: 9;
  margin: 0;
}

.parent {
  width: calc(100% - 40px);    /* 40px: 2 * 20px padding */
  height: calc(100% - 50px);   /* 50px: 2 * 25px padding */
  padding: 25px 20px;
  box-sizing: content-box;
  background-color: tomato;
}

.child {
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  background-color: #fbf7e5;
}
<div class="parent">
  <div class="child"></div>
</div>

1
  • This is the best answer in my opinion. There might be some issues with the exact example, but using calc on the parent is cleaner.
    – rubixibuc
    Commented Feb 5, 2022 at 16:02
1

When a flexbox layout used and a generic solution needed (say you do not want to be aware of the parent's padding sizes) the following shall be used (pay attention to the box-sizing property on parent:

.parent {
    display: flex;
    flex-direction: column;
    padding: 48px;
    box-sizing: border-box;
}

.child {
    width: 100%;
}
1
  • the best solution I have to say, if you don't want to always know what is the padding Commented Oct 18, 2023 at 11:16
0

Not sure if that is for your case specifically, but i had a form (trying to code for responsive), width:100% and needed padding in inputfields so the solution was

form {
   margin: 0px 3%;
   width: 94%;
}
input:valid, textarea:valid {
   width: inherit;
   padding: 15px;
}

Inherit on fields just did the trick. (Only tested in chrome)

Update: noticed that this breaks graphical layout with some pixels, also here is a good illustration: http://theturninggate.net/2012/01/better-responsive-forms/

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