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I am trying to get elements whose counts are even numbers in an array i have the below code. Say I check this array:

function checkEither(arr) {
  var newArr = [];
  for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
      var count = 0;
      for (var j = 0; j < arr.length; j++) {
          if (arr[j] == arr[i]) {
              count++;
          }
      }
      if ((count >= 3) || (count % 2 == 0)) {
          newArr.push(arr[i]);
      }
  }
  return newArr;
}


console.log(checkEither([10, 11, 12, 11, 10, 10, 13, 11, 12, 10, 13, 14, 11, 10, 12]));

I get

[ 10, 11, 12, 11, 10, 10, 13, 11, 12, 10, 13, 11, 10, 12 ]

Instead of

[ 10, 11, 12, 11, 10, 10, 13, 11, 12, 10, 13, 11 ]

The array should still contain items with odd occurences but result should show even amount of that item

the 10 appear five times and should only be four in the new array. How do i go about this? Thanks

  • 1
    please add what you want. do you need to return an even count of same numbers? – Nina Scholz Feb 22 at 12:44
  • I think I need to point out that OP is talking about the number of occurencies of the elements being even. People are getting visibly confused. Think twice before editing, folks. – Seblor Feb 22 at 12:48
  • 1
    you expecting result not matching you question. 12 is 3 time and 10 are 5 time there is not an even count.Its not present in result – prasanth Feb 22 at 12:50
  • I editted my question – diagold Feb 22 at 12:52
  • The most recent version of your question still says "the 10 appear five times and should only be four in the new array.". If you're only including numbers with an even count, 10 shouldn't appear in the result at all. 5 is not even. – T.J. Crowder Feb 22 at 13:10
1

You can use Array.prototype.filter twice to do what you need.

In the inner filter function (checkItem), you need to find how many times an item exists in the array and also get the last index.

The in the outer filter function (checkEither) return true if the count is divisible by 2 and also if the item isn't the last item of its type.

function checkEither(arr) {
  return arr.filter(function(item, index) {
    var { lastIndex, result } = checkItem(arr, item);
    return (result % 2 === 0) || (lastIndex !== index);
  });
}

function checkItem(arr, item) {
  var lastIndex = 0;
  var result = arr.filter(function(val, index) {
    var areEqual = val === item;
    if (areEqual) lastIndex = index;
    return areEqual;
  }).length;
  return { lastIndex, result };
}

console.log(checkEither([10, 11, 12, 11, 10, 10, 13, 11, 12, 10, 13, 14, 11, 10, 12]));
console.log(checkEither([1, 1, 2, 3, 3, 3]));

To improve the efficiency you could cache the results of each item to avoid checking the same item more than once.

function checkEither(arr) {
  var results = {};
  return arr.filter(function(item, index) {
     results[item] = results[item] || checkItem(arr, item);
     var { lastIndex, result } = results[item];
    return (result % 2 === 0) || (lastIndex !== index);
  });
}

function checkItem(arr, item) {
  var lastIndex = 0;
  var result = arr.filter(function(val, index) {
    var areEqual = val === item;
    if (areEqual) lastIndex = index;
    return areEqual;
  }).length;
  return { lastIndex, result };
}

console.log(checkEither([10, 11, 12, 11, 10, 10, 13, 11, 12, 10, 13, 14, 11, 10, 12]));
console.log(checkEither([1, 1, 2, 3, 3, 3]));

  • 3 should still be there but show twice instead of three times – diagold Feb 22 at 12:48
  • @diagold Fixed it – nick zoum Feb 22 at 13:02
2

This line is the problem:

if ((count >= 3) || (count % 2 == 0)) {

That says to include the entry if its count is greater than or equal to 3 or its count is even. So if the count is 5, it matches the first condition and is included.

If you want just even counts, remove the first condition:

if (count % 2 == 0) {

10 won't be in the result because there are 5 occurrences of it.

Live Example:

function checkEither(arr) {
  var newArr = [];
  for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
    var count = 0;
    for (var j = 0; j < arr.length; j++) {
      if (arr[j] == arr[i]) {
        count++;
      }
    }
    if (count % 2 == 0) {
      newArr.push(arr[i]);
    }
  }
  return newArr;
}

console.log(checkEither([10, 11, 12, 11, 10, 10, 13, 11, 12, 10, 13, 14, 11, 10, 12]));

If you also want the result to only include each number once, rather than repeatedly, you need to check whether it's already in the result array, see *** line:

function checkEither(arr) {
  var newArr = [];
  for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
    if (!newArr.includes(arr[i])) { // ***
      var count = 0;
      for (var j = 0; j < arr.length; j++) {
        if (arr[j] == arr[i]) {
          count++;
        }
      }
      if (count % 2 == 0) {
        newArr.push(arr[i]);
      }
    }
  }
  return newArr;
}

console.log(checkEither([10, 11, 12, 11, 10, 10, 13, 11, 12, 10, 13, 14, 11, 10, 12]));

That involves re-scanning newArr each time, which is absolutely fine for small arrays such as the one in the question, or even medium-size arrays. For really big arrays, you might want to keep track of known numbers in a Set (or object if you have to support obsolete platforms), as lookup time is better than linear with Set:

function checkEither(arr) {
  var checked = new Set();          // ***
  var newArr = [];
  for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
    if (!checked.has(arr[i])) {     // ***
      var count = 0;
      for (var j = 0; j < arr.length; j++) {
        if (arr[j] == arr[i]) {
          count++;
        }
      }
      if (count % 2 == 0) {
        newArr.push(arr[i]);
        checked.add(arr[i]);        // ***
      }
    }
  }
  return newArr;
}

console.log(checkEither([10, 11, 12, 11, 10, 10, 13, 11, 12, 10, 13, 14, 11, 10, 12]));

0

Just to note, this solution has O(n^2) and would be terrible for bigger sets of data. Depending on the input sets (if all are integer numbers in decent range) one can make a projection between the number and the helper array index where index represents the value of the number in the 1st array. Then on that index, you increment by 1 each time you find that value in the 1st array. In the end, you read that array (helper one) from start to finish and list index of each even number there.

In that solution, you have O(2n) which is O(n), calculate time difference on a set of only 10k big arrays for yourself ;)

Instead of going more into detail, you can find that approach here with pictures ;)

indexing array values in another array

Just to note, you can also do this with arrays of decimal numbers (multiply by 10^n and you get all integers), negative numbers (shift from furthest left one to 0 and start index there) etc.

For me, any not junior programer would never accept a quadratic time complexity over linear (and a simple one to implement) one as a viable solution unless data set is known to insignificantly small and never able to grow.

0

You could get the count, adjust the value to an even number and filter by decrementing the count.

function checkEither(array) {
    var count = array.reduce((c, v) => (c[v] = (c[v] || 0) + 1, c), {});
    Object.keys(count).forEach(k => count[k] = count[k] >> 1 << 1);
    return array.filter(v => count[v] && count[v]--);
}

console.log(checkEither([10, 11, 12, 11, 10, 10, 13, 11, 12, 10, 13, 14, 11, 10, 12]).join(' '));

A solution with only two loops by using an object and a flip-flop which changes the value from undefined to the actual index (for uneven count) and vice versa for even counts.

For example with 10

index  indices[10]  comment
-----  -----------  ------------------------------------
        undefined   at start
    0          0   
    4   undefined
    5          5 
    9   undefined
   13         13   at this index, the value is filtered

The result is the filtered array without element who have a stored index for a value.

function checkEither(array) {
    var indices = {};
    array.forEach((v, i) => indices[v] = { undefined: i }[indices[v]]);
    return array.filter((v, i) => indices[v] !== i);
}

console.log(checkEither([10, 11, 12, 11, 10, 10, 13, 11, 12, 10, 13, 14, 11, 10, 12]).join(' '));

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