45

I want to implement timer using Kotlin coroutines, something similar to this implemented with RxJava:

       Flowable.interval(0, 5, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
                    .observeOn(AndroidSchedulers.mainThread())
                    .map { LocalDateTime.now() }
                    .distinctUntilChanged { old, new ->
                        old.minute == new.minute
                    }
                    .subscribe {
                        setDateTime(it)
                    }

It will emit LocalDateTime every new minute.

2

12 Answers 12

69

Edit: note that the API suggested in the original answer is now marked @ObsoleteCoroutineApi:

Ticker channels are not currently integrated with structured concurrency and their api will change in the future.

You can now use the Flow API to create your own ticker flow:

import kotlin.time.Duration
import kotlin.time.Duration.Companion.seconds
import kotlinx.coroutines.*
import kotlinx.coroutines.flow.*

fun tickerFlow(period: Duration, initialDelay: Duration = Duration.ZERO) = flow {
    delay(initialDelay)
    while (true) {
        emit(Unit)
        delay(period)
    }
}

And you can use it in a way very similar to your current code:

tickerFlow(5.seconds)
    .map { LocalDateTime.now() }
    .distinctUntilChanged { old, new ->
        old.minute == new.minute
    }
    .onEach {
        setDateTime(it)
    }
    .launchIn(viewModelScope) // or lifecycleScope or other

Note: with the code as written here, the time taken to process elements is not taken into account by tickerFlow, so the delay might not be regular (it's a delay between element processing). If you want the ticker to tick independently of the processing of each element, you may want to use a buffer or a dedicated thread (e.g. via flowOn).


Original answer

I believe it is still experimental, but you may use a TickerChannel to produce values every X millis:

val tickerChannel = ticker(delayMillis = 60_000, initialDelayMillis = 0)

repeat(10) {
    tickerChannel.receive()
    val currentTime = LocalDateTime.now()
    println(currentTime)
}

If you need to carry on doing your work while your "subscribe" does something for each "tick", you may launch a background coroutine that will read from this channel and do the thing you want:

val tickerChannel = ticker(delayMillis = 60_000, initialDelayMillis = 0)

launch {
    for (event in tickerChannel) {
        // the 'event' variable is of type Unit, so we don't really care about it
        val currentTime = LocalDateTime.now()
        println(currentTime)
    }
}

delay(1000)

// when you're done with the ticker and don't want more events
tickerChannel.cancel()

If you want to stop from inside the loop, you can simply break out of it, and then cancel the channel:

val ticker = ticker(500, 0)

var count = 0

for (event in ticker) {
    count++
    if (count == 4) {
        break
    } else {
        println(count)
    }
}

ticker.cancel()
4
  • Is there a way to "uncancel" a ticker? How can I pause/unpause the ticker?
    – Lifes
    Dec 2, 2019 at 18:45
  • @Lifes you probably need to have some kind of "active" state variable to check when you receive a tick. You can set it to false when you want to "pause" and back to true when you want to "resume"
    – Joffrey
    Dec 2, 2019 at 23:12
  • Thanks for the fast reply. Given my use case, I don't want it to keep ticking, so I'm going to cancel and recreate it as needed.
    – Lifes
    Dec 3, 2019 at 2:43
  • 12
    ticker is marked as "ObsoleteCoroutinesApi" on version "1.3.2", witch means: "Marks declarations that are obsolete in coroutines API, which means that the design of the corresponding declarations has serious known flaws and they will be redesigned in the future. Roughly speaking, these declarations will be deprecated in the future but there is no replacement for them yet, so they cannot be deprecated right away."
    – aLx
    Mar 13, 2020 at 14:18
26

A very pragmatic approach with Kotlin Flows could be:

// Create the timer flow
val timer = (0..Int.MAX_VALUE)
    .asSequence()
    .asFlow()
    .onEach { delay(1_000) } // specify delay

// Consume it
timer.collect { 
    println("bling: ${it}")
}

4
  • 3
    How to be notified when ends? Nov 18, 2021 at 9:50
  • Make sure to import the flow using: import kotlinx.coroutines.flow.collect
    – Johann
    Mar 8 at 16:53
  • Why are we using here asSequence() function?
    – Hassa
    Jun 29 at 7:07
  • 1
    @Hassa to be the sequence of Ints being lazily created. Otherwise, all Ints from 0 .. Int.MAX_VALUE would be loaded in memory immediately, which you probably would not want. Jun 29 at 10:05
13

another possible solution as a reusable kotlin extension of CoroutineScope

fun CoroutineScope.launchPeriodicAsync(
    repeatMillis: Long,
    action: () -> Unit
) = this.async {
    if (repeatMillis > 0) {
        while (isActive) {
            action()
            delay(repeatMillis)
        }
    } else {
        action()
    }
}

and then usage as:

var job = CoroutineScope(Dispatchers.IO).launchPeriodicAsync(100) {
  //...
}

and then to interrupt it:

job.cancel()

another note: we consider here that action is non-blocking and does not take time.

7
  • 6
    It doesn't matter much here thanks to the delay() call, but in general we should avoid while (true) in coroutines, prefer while(isActive) to properly support cancellation.
    – Joffrey
    Dec 1, 2020 at 17:08
  • @Joffrey this is just an example, feel free to modify it for the better.
    – Raphael C
    Dec 3, 2020 at 5:53
  • What is the reason for using async() instead of launch() ?
    – Phileo99
    Oct 5, 2021 at 23:17
  • @Phileo99 I think you could do it either way, but if you use Async it returns a Deferred<T> which gives you a few more options than a launch {}, such as await(). Not sure that'd be all that useful in this case, but I don't think it adds much overhead. Deferred extends Job, so anything that launch can do async can also do.
    – AlexW.H.B.
    Feb 1 at 19:25
  • 1
    Keep in mind that the interval between subsequent action() calls is not the defined repeatMillis time, but repeatMillis + the time that action() takes to execute. So this solution is fine as long as action() doesn't take too long. By using flows with buffer(), conflate(), or flowOn, we can get intervals that are about constant. Jul 7 at 8:24
10

You can create a countdown timer like this

GlobalScope.launch(Dispatchers.Main) {
            val totalSeconds = TimeUnit.MINUTES.toSeconds(2)
            val tickSeconds = 1
            for (second in totalSeconds downTo tickSeconds) {
                val time = String.format("%02d:%02d",
                    TimeUnit.SECONDS.toMinutes(second),
                    second - TimeUnit.MINUTES.toSeconds(TimeUnit.SECONDS.toMinutes(second))
                )
                timerTextView?.text = time
                delay(1000)
            }
            timerTextView?.text = "Done!"
        }
3
  • 4
    Use lifecycleScope instead to avoid leaking the Fragment or Activity.
    – Tenfour04
    Oct 26, 2020 at 20:05
  • 1
    Good solution, but I don't agree with GlobalScope. viewModelScope or lifecycleScope is much more preferablee Aug 30, 2021 at 13:00
  • I just want to mention that this solution is not 100% exact. The countdown will run a bit longer than 120 seconds because the date formatting and setting the text on the TextView will also take some time. I guess in most use cases this won't be an issue, otherwise you should stick to the flow{} solution (combined with buffer(), conflate() or flowOn) Jul 7 at 8:30
4

Edit: Joffrey has edited his solution with a better approach.

Old :

Joffrey's solution works for me but I ran into a problem with the for loop.

I have to cancel my ticker in the for loop like this :

            val ticker = ticker(500, 0)
            for (event in ticker) {
                if (...) {
                    ticker.cancel()
                } else {
                    ...
                    }
                }
            }

But ticker.cancel() was throwing a cancellationException because the for loop kept going after this.

I had to use a while loop to check if the channel was not closed to not get this exception.

                val ticker = ticker(500, 0)
                while (!ticker.isClosedForReceive && ticker.iterator().hasNext()) {
                    if (...) {
                        ticker.cancel()
                    } else {
                        ...
                        }
                    }
                }
4
  • 1
    Why don't you just break out of the loop if you know you want it to stop? You can then cancel the ticker outside of the loop, this worked fine for me. Also, you're creating a new iterator at each loop turn with this approach, this may not be what you want to do.
    – Joffrey
    Dec 3, 2019 at 16:55
  • Sometimes we don't think of the simplest solutions... You are absolutely right, thanks! Dec 4, 2019 at 8:41
  • No problem :) That being said, I didn't expect cancel() to fail when called from within the loop, so you taught me something on this one. I will need to investigate further to get to the bottom of this.
    – Joffrey
    Dec 4, 2019 at 10:38
  • Well with the coroutines's version 1.2.2 it didn't failed! But I upgraded to the version 1.3.2 and now it does. Maybe it was supposed to fail with the 1.2.2 and they fixed it or it's a bug introduced... Dec 4, 2019 at 11:27
4

Here's a possible solution using Kotlin Flow

fun tickFlow(millis: Long) = callbackFlow<Int> {
    val timer = Timer()
    var time = 0
    timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(
        object : TimerTask() {
            override fun run() {
                try { offer(time) } catch (e: Exception) {}
                time += 1
            }
        },
        0,
        millis)
    awaitClose {
        timer.cancel()
    }
}

Usage

val job = CoroutineScope(Dispatchers.Main).launch {
   tickFlow(125L).collect {
      print(it)
   }
}

...

job.cancel()
4
  • You are wrapping Timer with coroutines, why?! This simply makes no sense; either use timer or coroutines
    – Farid
    Jan 10 at 13:31
  • It could be useful for example in a view model that has its scope like CoroutineScope(Dispatchers.Main + viewModelJob). If you need to perform a network check periodically you could launch the tick coroutine using that scope and with all the other coroutines (such as network requests or database queries) and then cancel the viewModelJob once for all. By the way, if it is useless for you no problem, it's fair. Jan 13 at 19:14
  • Just to be clear canceling coroutine won't do anything to the Timer you have to make your flow cancellable(). Yet, even if you make your flow cancellable() canceling your flow and job won't stop the timer from "ticking". On top of that Timer is already using another thread I don't really get the reason for wrapping it with flow.
    – Farid
    Jan 13 at 19:34
  • I confirm that with the above code the tick stops on job.cancel(). Just used it on a real case app in a Fragment. Feb 15 at 9:13
2

Timer with START, PAUSE and STOP functions.

Usage:

val timer = Timer(millisInFuture = 10_000L, runAtStart = false)
timer.start()

Timer class:

import kotlinx.coroutines.*
import kotlinx.coroutines.flow.MutableStateFlow
import kotlinx.coroutines.flow.asStateFlow

enum class PlayerMode {
    PLAYING,
    PAUSED,
    STOPPED
}

class Timer(
    val millisInFuture: Long,
    val countDownInterval: Long = 1000L,
    runAtStart: Boolean = false,
    val onFinish: (() -> Unit)? = null,
    val onTick: ((Long) -> Unit)? = null
) {
    private var job: Job = Job()
    private val _tick = MutableStateFlow(0L)
    val tick = _tick.asStateFlow()
    private val _playerMode = MutableStateFlow(PlayerMode.STOPPED)
    val playerMode = _playerMode.asStateFlow()

    private val scope = CoroutineScope(Dispatchers.Default)

    init {
        if (runAtStart) start()
    }

    fun start() {
        if (_tick.value == 0L) _tick.value = millisInFuture
        job.cancel()
        job = scope.launch(Dispatchers.IO) {
            _playerMode.value = PlayerMode.PLAYING
            while (isActive) {
                if (_tick.value <= 0) {
                    job.cancel()
                    onFinish?.invoke()
                    _playerMode.value = PlayerMode.STOPPED
                    return@launch
                }
                delay(timeMillis = countDownInterval)
                _tick.value -= countDownInterval
                onTick?.invoke(this@Timer._tick.value)
            }
        }
    }

    fun pause() {
        job.cancel()
        _playerMode.value = PlayerMode.PAUSED
    }

    fun stop() {
        job.cancel()
        _tick.value = 0
        _playerMode.value = PlayerMode.STOPPED
    }
}

I took inspiration from here.

1

Here is Flow version of Observable.intervalRange(1, 5, 0, 1, TimeUnit.SECONDS) based on Joffrey's answer:

fun tickerFlow(start: Long,
               count: Long,
               initialDelayMs: Long,
               periodMs: Long) = flow<Long> {
    delay(initialDelayMs)

    var counter = start
    while (counter <= count) {
        emit(counter)
        counter += 1

        delay(periodMs)
    }
}

//...

tickerFlow(1, 5, 0, 1_000L)
0

Made a copy of Observable.intervalRange(0, 90, 0, 1, TimeUnit.SECONDS) ( will emit item in 90 sec each 1 sec ):

fun intervalRange(start: Long, count: Long, initialDelay: Long = 0, period: Long, unit: TimeUnit): Flow<Long> {
        return flow<Long> {
            require(count >= 0) { "count >= 0 required but it was $count" }
            require(initialDelay >= 0) { "initialDelay >= 0 required but it was $initialDelay" }
            require(period > 0) { "period > 0 required but it was $period" }

            val end = start + (count - 1)
            require(!(start > 0 && end < 0)) { "Overflow! start + count is bigger than Long.MAX_VALUE" }

            if (initialDelay > 0) {
                delay(unit.toMillis(initialDelay))
            }

            var counter = start
            while (counter <= count) {
                emit(counter)
                counter += 1

                delay(unit.toMillis(period))
            }
        }
    }

Usage:

lifecycleScope.launch {
intervalRange(0, 90, 0, 1, TimeUnit.SECONDS)
                .onEach {
                    Log.d(TAG, "intervalRange: ${90 - it}")
                }
                .lastOrNull()
}
0

enter image description here

enter code here
private val updateLiveShowTicker = flow {
    while (true) {
        emit(Unit)
        delay(1000L * UPDATE_PROGRAM_INFO_INTERVAL_SECONDS)
    }
}

private val updateShowProgressTicker = flow {
    while (true) {
        emit(Unit)
        delay(1000L * UPDATE_SHOW_PROGRESS_INTERVAL_SECONDS)
    }
}

private val liveShow = updateLiveShowTicker
    .combine(channelId) { _, channelId -> programInfoRepository.getShow(channelId) }
    .catch { emit(LiveShow(application.getString(R.string.activity_channel_detail_info_error))) }
    .shareIn(viewModelScope, SharingStarted.WhileSubscribed(), replay = 1)
    .distinctUntilChanged()

My solution,You can now use the Flow API to create your own ticker flow:

0

Used this recently to chunk values based on a timer and max buffer size.

private object Tick

@Suppress("UNCHECKED_CAST")
fun <T : Any> Flow<T>.chunked(size: Int, initialDelay: Long, delay: Long): Flow<List<T>> = flow {
    if (size <= 0) throw IllegalArgumentException("invalid chunk size $size - expected > 0")
    val chunkedList = mutableListOf<T>()
    if (delay > 0L) {
        merge(this@chunked, timerFlow(initialDelay, delay, Tick))
    } else {
        this@chunked
    }
        .collect {
            when (it) {
                is Tick -> {
                    if (chunkedList.isNotEmpty()) {
                        emit(chunkedList.toList())
                        chunkedList.clear()
                    }
                }
                else -> {
                    chunkedList.add(it as T)
                    if (chunkedList.size >= size) {
                        emit(chunkedList.toList())
                        chunkedList.clear()
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    if (chunkedList.isNotEmpty()) {
        emit(chunkedList.toList())
    }
}

fun <T> timerFlow(initialDelay: Long, delay: Long, o: T) = flow {
    if (delay <= 0) throw IllegalArgumentException("invalid delay $delay - expected > 0")
    if (initialDelay > 0) delay(initialDelay)
    while (currentCoroutineContext().isActive) {
        emit(o)
        delay(delay)
    }
}
-2

It's not using Kotlin coroutines, but if your use case is simple enough you can always just use something like a fixedRateTimer or timer (docs here) which resolve to JVM native Timer.

I was using RxJava's interval for a relatively simple scenario and when I switched to using Timers I saw significant performance and memory improvements.

You can also run your code on the main thread on Android by using View.post() or it's mutliple variants.

The only real annoyance is you'll need to keep track of the old time's state yourself instead of relying on RxJava to do it for you.

But this will always be much faster (important if you're doing performance critical stuff like UI animations etc) and will not have the memory overhead of RxJava's Flowables.

Here's the question's code using a fixedRateTimer:


var currentTime: LocalDateTime = LocalDateTime.now()

fixedRateTimer(period = 5000L) {
    val newTime = LocalDateTime.now()
    if (currentTime.minute != newTime.minute) {
        post { // post the below code to the UI thread to update UI stuff
            setDateTime(newTime)
        }
        currentTime = newTime
    }
}

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