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I am using R to compute a Spearman correlation between two interval datasets (i.e. wave height and North Atlantic Oscillation Index).

First question: Am I right by saying that R transforms my interval data to ranked data and then does the correlation?

Second question: I am getting the following warning:

In cor.test.default(hs, df$V1, method = "spearman") :
  Cannot compute exact p-value with ties

So should I use Kendall correlation instead of Spearman? Or is there an option in R for Spearman correlation that can deal with ties? The reason I used Spearman in the first place is that it does not assume a distribution shape.

Many thanks!

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2 Answers 2

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The problem - as the error message is explaining - is that there are ties in your data. In this event, the Kendall tau-b should be used to calculate the p-value, as it is specifically equipped to handle ties.

Let's consider the following x and y:

x <- c(44.4, 41.9, 41.9, 53.3, 44.7, 44.1, 50.7, 45.2, 60.1)
y <- c( 2.6,  3.1,  3.1,  5.0,  3.6,  4.0,  5.2,  2.8,  3.8)

Suppose a correlation test is run using both Kendall and Spearman statistics.

Kendall

> cor.test(x, y, method = "kendall", alternative = "greater")

    Kendall's rank correlation tau

data:  x and y
z = 1.1593, p-value = 0.1232
alternative hypothesis: true tau is greater than 0
sample estimates:
      tau 
0.3142857 

Warning message:
In cor.test.default(x, y, method = "kendall", alternative = "greater") :
  Cannot compute exact p-value with ties

Spearman

> cor.test(x, y, method = "spearman", alternative = "greater")

    Spearman's rank correlation rho

data:  x and y
S = 62.521, p-value = 0.09602
alternative hypothesis: true rho is greater than 0
sample estimates:
      rho 
0.4789916 

Warning message:
In cor.test.default(x, y, method = "spearman", alternative = "greater") :
  Cannot compute exact p-value with ties

In both cases, we get the error message "cannot compute exact p-value with ties".

A way around this is to use the Kendall package in R.

> library(Kendall)
> 
> x <- c(44.4, 41.9, 41.9, 53.3, 44.7, 44.1, 50.7, 45.2, 60.1)
> y <- c( 2.6,  3.1,  3.1,  5.0,  3.6,  4.0,  5.2,  2.8,  3.8)
> summary(Kendall(x,y))
Score =  11 , Var(Score) = 90.02778
denominator =  35
tau = 0.314, 2-sided pvalue =0.29191

We see that in this scenario, the Kendall statistic is accounting for the fact that ties exist in our data and is calculating the p-value accordingly.

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  • Thank you! I'll definitely try it with the Kendall package.
    – Jeka39
    Commented Feb 22, 2019 at 15:04
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First :The Spearman rank correlation coefficient is a nonparametric method because it ranks the values and obtains the correlation coefficient values for the rankings. I think because you ranked it yourself, the ranks are not unique anymore and hence exact p-values cannot be calculated.

Second : It is just warning. Not error. According to my community, Kendall's tau is almost identical to the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. The correlation coefficient values can be slightly different, but the p-value has almost the same value.

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  • The ranks being unique or not about having ties in the data. Not about who ranks the data
    – Sam
    Commented Feb 22 at 11:50

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