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I have an extension method that iterates over a list of a POCO class with DateTimes. This method then combines schedules that overlap or fall within a tolerance timespan of one another. This works fine!

However, part of my need is to also get a list of the Ids (from DB) of the items combined for later reference. I tried to convert my extension method to return my custom class but I get the following error:

Error   CS1624  The body of 'Extensions.Combine(CombinedSchedules)' cannot be an iterator block because 'CombinedSchedules' is not an iterator interface type

Here is my extension method:

        public static CombinedSchedules Combine(this CombinedSchedules items)
    {
        using (IEnumerator<ScheduleDto> enumerator = items.Schedules.GetEnumerator())
        {
            if (!enumerator.MoveNext())
            {
                yield break;
            }

            var previous = enumerator.Current;
            while (enumerator.MoveNext())
            {
                var next = enumerator.Current;

                if (TryCombine(previous, next, out var combined))
                {
                    items.IncludedSchedules.TryAdd(previous.Id);
                    previous = combined;
                    continue;
                }

                yield return previous;
                previous = next;

            }

            yield return previous;
        }
    }

Here is the CombinedSchedules class:

public class CombinedSchedules : IEnumerable<ScheduleDto>, IDisposable
{
    bool disposed = false;
    // Instantiate a SafeHandle instance.
    SafeHandle handle = new SafeFileHandle(IntPtr.Zero, true);

    public List<ScheduleDto> Schedules { get; set; }
    public List<int> IncludedSchedules { get; set; }



    public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        return Schedules.GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator<ScheduleDto> IEnumerable<ScheduleDto>.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return Schedules.GetEnumerator();
    }

    #region IDisposable Support
    private bool disposedValue = false; // To detect redundant calls

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!disposedValue)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                // TODO: dispose managed state (managed objects).
            }

            // TODO: free unmanaged resources (unmanaged objects) and override a finalizer below.
            // TODO: set large fields to null.

            disposedValue = true;
        }
    }

    // TODO: override a finalizer only if Dispose(bool disposing) above has code to free unmanaged resources.
    // ~CombinedSchedules() {
    //   // Do not change this code. Put cleanup code in Dispose(bool disposing) above.
    //   Dispose(false);
    // }

    // This code added to correctly implement the disposable pattern.
    public void Dispose()
    {
        // Do not change this code. Put cleanup code in Dispose(bool disposing) above.
        Dispose(true);
        // TODO: uncomment the following line if the finalizer is overridden above.
        // GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }
    #endregion
}

How can I get back all the things I need in order to later reference the list of combined schedules? Thanks in advance!

  • It looks like your enumerator is using the class ScheduleDto. So you custom class would need to inherit the ScheduleDto class. – jdweng Feb 22 at 16:23
  • 1
    Have you tried making your Combine extension method return an IEnumerable instead of just a single object – Flydog57 Feb 22 at 16:24
  • public static IEnumerable<ScheduleDto> Combine(this CombinedSchedules items) to start. – Zer0 Feb 22 at 16:26
  • @Flydog57 I have. The problem is, an IEnumerable<ScheduleDto> does not have the List<int> that I need of the combined schedule Ids. – Aaron Rumford Feb 22 at 16:26
  • 1
    I suggest you turn your extension method from an iterator method into a "normal" extension method. Inside the method, ScheduleDto instances will be combined as well as their IDs processed as necessary, and a new CombinedSchedules object will be populated with those. Then just return the new CombinedSchedules object. Done. No more headaches with the iterator method. – elgonzo Feb 22 at 17:09
2

If the Combine method should return a new CombinedSchedules object, i would suggest to turn it from an iterator method into a "normal" extension method, more or less following this roughly outlined logic:

The extension method would enumerate over and combine the ScheduleDto instances from the provided original source CombinedSchedules object and also build a new IncludedSchedules collection along the way. With the combined ScheduleDto's and the new IncludedSchedules collection, a new CombinedSchedules object will be created and returned.

4

When you use yield return or yield break in a method, it must return IEnumerable, IEnumerator, or the generic versions. What happens here is the C# compiler rebuilds your method into the MoveNext method of an object that implements IEnumerator and IEnumerable.

The compiler doesn't know how to build a list, or a dictionary, or a string, or any other type that also implements IEnumerable.

Now, the feature you want is possible, and we know it is possible because C# 7 does so for async methods. In previous versions, async methods could only return Task, void, or Task<T> for the same reason, but in C# 7 the compiler team added the ability to supply your own "task builder" class.

The compiler team could in theory do the same thing for iterator blocks but the general feeling is that there's not much demand for the feature.

Your best bet then is to pick one of two strategies:

  • Stick with your method that yields, and then write another extension method that turns a sequence into your data type. See ToList, or ToDictionary or string.Join or any number of other methods that takes a sequence and returns an entirely different data structure derived from that sequence. This technique is useful if you are often in a situation where you need to construct a summary object from a sequence. The call site would be combined.GetSchedules().Combine() where GetSchedules() takes CombinedSchedule and returns IEnumerable<Schedule> and Combine() takes IEnumerable<Schedule> and returns CombinedSchedule.
  • Stop yielding; create a CombinedScheduleBuilder object, and everywhere that you would yield, instead call the Add method on your builder. (yield breaks become returns.) The last thing your method does is return the thing that the builder built. This is useful for cases where you are simply transforming one object into another, which seems like a good match for your scenario. (This is basically the idea that the answer from elgonzo proposes.)

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