0

I have a groovy script called Foo.groovy, an instance of that script can be constructed using the following syntax:

def foo = new Foo()

i know if Foo.groovy looks like:

import groovy.transform.Field

@Field def bar

def someMethod() {
  //...
}

the following syntax:

def foo = new Foo(bar: 'baz')

will use some default constructor and actually set the bar field to baz, but let's say that i wanted to manipulate the passed value of bar to add an exclamation point at the end like so "${bar}!"

would like to be able to do something like the following (which doesn't work AFAIK):

import groovy.transform.Field

@Field def bar

Foo(args) {
  bar = "${args.bar}!"
}

def someMethod() {
  //...
}

Is there an idiomatic way to accomplish that in groovy?

6
  • Typically you would not explicitly construct and bootstrap a Groovy Script. Usually you would run it using groovy command (or equivalent in IDE) and pass binding arguments on the command line.
    – emilles
    Feb 23, 2019 at 22:08
  • thanks @emilles, this is in the context of a jenkins shared library where i have a series of scripts and i am calling new on them. i kno a little odd, but the jenkins environment is a little odd :)
    – tony_k
    Feb 23, 2019 at 22:31
  • 1
    I think there is an import/include method to make a sub-script available within another.
    – emilles
    Feb 24, 2019 at 0:47
  • 1
    Otherwise, a script is a subclass of groovy.lang.Script unless you specify otherwise. And you can construct an instance with default constructor and call setBinding to pass context for free variables and call run() to execute.
    – emilles
    Feb 24, 2019 at 0:49
  • 1
    Looking at the AST, it looks like you also get a constructor that accepts Binding. And you get a static main method. So you should be able to call "Foo.main(args)" and the args from one script's bindings should be transferred to another.
    – emilles
    Feb 24, 2019 at 16:35

3 Answers 3

1

You may use setter method

(Foo.groovy):

import groovy.transform.Field

@Field def bar

void setBar(def bar){
    this.bar = "${bar}!"
    println "Setter is executed. ${bar} -> ${this.bar}"
}

And if the calling party will look like

import Foo
def foo = new Foo(bar: 'baz')
println foo.bar

the following result appears:

Setter is executed. baz -> baz!
baz!
1

You can have a method like initialise that acts as a constructor. That way you can use it for multiple arguments as well.

import groovy.transform.Field

@Field def bar

// initialise can be used in-place of constructor for enclosing class
def initialise(args) {
  bar = "${args.bar}!"
  this // return initialised object
}

def someMethod() {
  println(bar)
}

This can be called as follows

def foo = new Foo().initialise(args)

foo.someMethod()
0

Any free variable in the main body of the script can be satisfied out of the Binding object. It works pretty much like a map because it has a map-based constructor and has overloaded getProperty and setProperty. http://docs.groovy-lang.org/latest/html/gapi/groovy/lang/Binding.html

Main script:

def binding = new Binding(bar: 'baz')
def foo = new Foo(binding)
foo.run()

Foo.groovy:

someMethod(bar + '!')

def someMethod(baz) { // bar/baz value must be passed in
  // do something with baz
}

I have not tried this out, but it should be easy enough to plug it into Groovy Console and see what happens.

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