2

I have $arr with many records, but i only showed 2 records here for simplicity:

$arr = [
     {
       'a' => 1,
       'b' => 2,
       'c' => 'failed'
     },
     {
       'a' => 5,
       'b' => 6,
       'c' => 'success'
    },
    {...}, {...}, {...}
    ];

I want to loop thru $arr above and ignore any record with 'c'='success' and put in a new $newarr; or it's ok to overwrite $arr instead of creating a new $newarr.

$newarr = [
     {
       'a' => 1,
       'b' => 2,
       'c' => 'failed'
     }
];
  • grep is your friend – raina77ow Feb 22 at 21:41
  • I've been trying. They only showed how to loop thru and search and print certain key=value. – Jason TK Feb 22 at 21:49
  • 2
    Try this: my $newarr = [ grep { !( exists $_->{c} and $_->{c} eq 'success') } @$arr ] – Håkon Hægland Feb 22 at 21:54
  • 1
    That did it. Thank you so much. @HåkonHægland – Jason TK Feb 22 at 22:07
  • Much like in the accepted answer, that leaves some elements in $newarr and $arr as references to same data, so it leaves you with a bug: for some changes in $arr the $newarr is changed, and the other way round. Instead, you'd needa deep copy, or @$arr = grep { ... } @$arr – zdim Feb 23 at 2:49
4

A simple grep should achieve this:

  • @{} to de-reference the array ref
  • grep {} to apply a filter on the resulting list
  • $_->{c] ne 'success' the filter that should be applied to each element
  • grep aliases $_ to each element in the list: in your case each list element is a hash ref
  • $->{c} de-reference the hash ref to retrieve the value for key c
  • NOTE: this is a shallow copy approach, i.e. @{ $arr } and @new contain references to the same hash refs.

For details see perlfunc.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

use Data::Dumper;

my $arr = [
    {
        'a' => 1,
        'b' => 2,
        'c' => 'failed',
    },
    {
        'a' => 5,
        'b' => 6,
        'c' => 'success',
    },
];

my @new = grep { $_->{c} ne 'success' } @{ $arr };

print Dumper(\@new);

exit 0;

Test run:

$ perl dummy.pl
$VAR1 = [
          {
            'c' => 'failed',
            'b' => 2,
            'a' => 1
          }
        ];
  • "The elements won't be recreated" -- correct, but that's a bug: If a value is changed in $arr then @new may get changed, and vice versa. – zdim Feb 23 at 2:39
  • @zdim that's why I pointed it out to the OP so that he is aware of it. – Stefan Becker Feb 23 at 8:16
  • Sure, but there is nothing one can do about it once it's there; just can't work with these any more. However, I think that @$arr = grep ... @$arr takes care of it? The OP says that overwriting is fine. (One can also mention a deep copy, with say dclone.) – zdim Feb 23 at 8:38

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