123

Simply put, vscode is showing this error in a module:

Cannot find module '@/components/SidebarToggleIcon'

But no such error shows up during compilation.

This is a VueJS project and SidebarToggleIcon is a .vue file with TypeScript in the <script lang="ts"> section. This error was showing up before in VSCode and during compilation until I added the @vue/eslint-config-typescript package. Now is just shows up in VSCode.

Sidebar.vue

<script lang="ts">
// [skip other imports]
import SidebarToggleIcon from '@/components/SidebarToggleIcon';

@Component
export default class LayoutSidebar extends Vue {

    get sidebarCollapsed(): boolean {
        return preferenceModule.sidebarCollapsed;
    }
}

</script>

SidebarToggleIcon.vue

<script lang="ts">
import Vue from 'vue';
import { getModule } from 'vuex-module-decorators';
import Component from "vue-class-component";
import PreferencesStore from '@/store/PreferencesStore';

const preferenceModule: PreferencesStore = getModule(PreferencesStore);

@Component
export default class SidebarToggleIcon extends Vue {

    get sidebarCollapsed(): boolean {
        return preferenceModule.sidebarCollapsed;
    }

    toggle(){
        preferenceModule.ToggleSidebar();
    }
}
</script>

enter image description here

Why is this? How do I solve this?

Edit: This is not an issue with the @ alias, those resolve correctly (in the screenshot the line above the error uses it, and I use it elsewhere in the project), this error still shows up when using relative paths. My TSConfig has the appropriate "paths": { "@/*": ["src/*"] } item. If this was the issue compiling would also throw this error, which it does not, this is only present in VSCode.

1

16 Answers 16

149

For me, for a Vite & Vue 3 project in PhpStorm it was enough to create a shims file in the src directory. Most of my components use only script setup.

src/shims-vue.d.ts

declare module '*.vue';
10
  • 26
    This worked for me... but I have absolutely no idea why. Can anyone explain what this does and why it means that the module (or corresponding type declarations) can now be found? Commented Mar 24, 2022 at 10:36
  • 3
    Finally a quick'n easy solution to get rid of headache for setting up a bare minimum ts vue project.
    – Enfield Li
    Commented Apr 11, 2022 at 0:04
  • 9
    Seconding the call for an explanation? For now I can only thank the magical sky fairies
    – tombh
    Commented Aug 12, 2022 at 15:34
  • 4
    it remove the warning but the component import definition is not navigable.. I fix it well with the downbk comment » stackoverflow.com/a/73710755/9485417 Commented Oct 9, 2022 at 13:54
  • 2
    Nope, the warning is disappear but when you use 'F12' trying to jump to definition, it always jump to this file.
    – FlyC
    Commented Mar 30, 2023 at 15:05
116

I've installed TypeScript Vue Plugin (Volar) VS Code extension and the problem was solved.

Remember to disable this VS Code built-in extension: TypeScript and JavaScript Language Features. You could read more here.

  1. In your project workspace, bring up the command palette with Ctrl+Shift+P (for macOS: +Shift+P).
  2. Type built and select "Extensions: Show Built-in Extensions". Type typescript in the extension search box (do not remove @builtin prefix).

Search for "@builtin typescript" in VS Code Extension search box and select the extension "TypeScript and JavaScript Language Features"

  1. Click the little gear icon of "TypeScript and JavaScript Language Features", and select "Disable (Workspace)".
  2. Reload the workspace. Takeover mode will be enabled when you open a Vue or TS file.
  3. (Optional) If you have set custom path alias for webpack or vite (or other module bundler), remember to add path alias for typescript support

tsconfig.json

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    /* other configs */
    "paths": {
      "@/*": [
        "./src/*" // set path `@/*` as alias of `src/*`
      ]
    },
    /* other configs */
  }
}
9
  • 1
    Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Commented Sep 19, 2022 at 7:56
  • 2
    in fact, it seems that just having a tsconfig.json with just {} is enought in my case Commented Oct 12, 2022 at 18:43
  • 2
    Installing Volar fixed for me. Commented Oct 26, 2022 at 14:04
  • 4
    Why hasn't this been flagged as the correct answer. Commented Feb 17, 2023 at 19:05
  • 2
    This extension has been deprecated! See: marketplace.visualstudio.com/… Commented Mar 19 at 12:10
62

This is because TypeScript does not resolve webpack aliases automatically.

For TS to resolve aliases, they should be added in tsconfig.json under compilerOptions.paths:

{  
  "compilerOptions": {
   "paths": {
     "@/*": [
      "./*"
     ]
    }
  }
}

Reload your IDE after these changes

5
  • 3
    Webpack aliases are resolving correctly, see the line above that also has an @. This is not the problem. I can use direct paths and this still shows up. Commented Feb 23, 2019 at 22:39
  • 3
    Another option is that it does not resolve *.vue files correctly. Did you try to add an extension to the file to see if it works? Example. @/components/SidebarToggleIcon.vue
    – aBiscuit
    Commented Feb 24, 2019 at 1:17
  • I have tried that as well. I even create a brand new vue typescript project with vuecli and the issue persists, but only in vscode. Commented Feb 25, 2019 at 1:39
  • SO, created a new clean project, and manually wrote in all my code, and I can now import with a .vue at the end of the filename for the import. Commented Feb 25, 2019 at 2:14
  • 4
    This didn't do the trick for me. I've yet to find out what's going to do the trick Commented Apr 12, 2021 at 8:06
31

In the Sidebar.vue file, try to add the ".vue" extension in import declaration , something like this:

import SidebarToggleIcon from '@/components/SidebarToggleIcon.vue';
2
  • 1
    This answer did the trick for me. Maybe it's related to shims-vue.d.ts where I have this: declare module '*.vue' { import type { DefineComponent } from 'vue' const component: DefineComponent<{}, {}, any> export default component } Commented Nov 17, 2020 at 11:31
  • 3
    Doesn't work for me, neither with the config in the comment by @JavierPallarés
    – paddotk
    Commented Mar 24, 2022 at 16:26
21

On my machine, VS Code extension Vetur produces the error message for my @/ imports in <script lang="ts"> Vue components in my multi-project repository.

Seems Vetur looks in the VS Code workspace top-level folder for the tsconfig.json. My Vue app, with its tsconfig.json, is in a sub-folder. Vetur does not pass along the correct settings when invoking the TypeScript compiler.

Solution 1 (temporary hack)

Start VS Code from inside the Vue project's root folder. (The same folder as the correct tsconfig.json.)

code .

Make sure the tsconfig.json contains the compilerOptions.baseUrl property in addition to the compilerOptions.paths property (Vetur FAQ).

This changes my VS Code settings and extension settings; as the project-level .vscode folder is no longer accessible. (I use symbolic links to keep the workspace-level and Vue-level .vscode folders in sync.)

Solution 2 (hack)

I have a single Vue project in my workspace, so I added a modified tsconfig.json file to my overall workspace folder, (the parent folder of my Vue application folder).

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "baseUrl": ".",
    "paths": {
      "@/*": ["myVue/src/*"]
    }
  },
  "exclude": ["node_modules"]
}

I needed the "baseUrl" property in addition to the "paths" property (again Vetur FAQ).

I reloaded VS Code for changes to take effect.

The "exclude" property may not be required, but I am paranoid of Vetur's invocation of the TypeScript compiler wasting time on the node_modules folder.

Background

This may be related to the (currently) open Vetur issue Multi root support #424. (Summary: Vetur expects exactly one SPA in the VS Code workspace top-level folder.)

0
15

A bit late but make sure to use workspace version of TS in VSCode so that it loads local TS plugins. Refer to this comment: https://github.com/vitejs/vite/issues/965#issuecomment-717248892

With VSCode, you can select your workspace TS Version: enter image description here

enter image description here

14

After adding the .vue extension on the import, I resolved this error by adding typescript shims for vue files.

I created a file in typings/sfc.d.ts containing this:

declare module '*.vue' {
    import Vue from 'vue'
    export default Vue
}

References: https://github.com/vuejs/vue/issues/5298#issuecomment-453036640

1
  • 1
    I added this to my src/ folder (using electron-webpack) and this fixed the problem. I just don't know WHY it fixed the problem...
    – user3909192
    Commented Oct 12, 2020 at 16:07
5

If you use defineComponent in your *.vue files in Vue3 you can add a shim for example in typings/sfc.d.ts as

declare module '*.vue' {
    import {defineComponent} from 'vue';
    export default defineComponent;
}
2
  • 1
    This works very well as it is significantly more properly typed. Commented Mar 4, 2023 at 2:16
  • 1
    This is really good! Commented May 18, 2023 at 7:01
5

If you are using Vue 3 you should add this into a type file like vue.d.ts:

declare module '*.vue' {
  import type {DefineComponent} from 'vue'
  // eslint-disable-next-line @typescript-eslint/no-explicit-any
  const component: DefineComponent<object, object, any>
  export default component
}

You can see it working here: source

You must add generic types if you use VueTestUtils mount method.

2
  • This instantly fixed the issue in my Vue3 project; will see how it goes! Thanks.
    – Kalnode
    Commented May 3 at 13:23
  • Also, is root the best place for this file?
    – Kalnode
    Commented May 3 at 13:24
3

If the Vetur extension is causing the error and you are using the tsconfig paths mapping, what worked for me was to create a vetur.config.js file at the top level folder specifying where to find the tsconfig.json file like below :

module.exports = {
  projects: [
    {
      root: "./yourprojectdirectory",
      tsconfig: "./tsconfig",
    },
  ],
};

It seems like Vetur will try to look for a tsconfig.json at your root directory so if your project is inside a sub folder it won't be able to find it by itself.

https://vuejs.github.io/vetur/guide/setup.html#advanced

1
  • Tried it but it doesnt recognize my tsconfig still.
    – Qba
    Commented Jul 20, 2022 at 17:24
2

If you're using typescript and want to import component from external library in your vuejs project. This is how I solved my issue.

  1. create index.d.ts file at src/
  2. add this code -> declare module 'myAwesomeLib'
  3. import component -> import {SomeMethod} from 'myAwesomeLib'

*.d.ts files are used to provide typescript type information about a module that's written in JavaScript.

1

For Vue 3 (with typescript), consider this fix. It works well with Vite also.

0

I'm a bit late to the party, but since I had these problems as well, even if I had the correct paths settings, vite.config.ts and tsconfig.json files, I figured out that I hat do use the newer Volar extension in vue 3 projects, rather than Vetur, wich I had installed from my older vue 2 projects.

  • Uninstall or disable Vetur
  • Install Vue Language Features (Volar)
  • Install Typescript Vue Plugin (Volar)

--> See also https://vuejs.org/guide/typescript/overview.html#ide-support

0

With VSCode, you can try install TypeScript Vue Plugin (Volar) and enable it.

enter image description here

0

My typescript configs was right and I just could fix the message by uninstalling the vetur from my VSCode.

1
  • As it’s currently written, your answer is unclear. Please edit to add additional details that will help others understand how this addresses the question asked. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Commented Jan 11 at 6:36
0

If you're migrating from Vue 2 to Vue 3, make sure to have in the file: src/shims-vue.d.ts only this line:

declare module '*.vue';

I was having this in Vue 2, and hadn't worked until I kept only the above line alone in the file:

declare module '*.vue' {
  import Vue from 'vue'
  export default Vue
}

NOTE: If the mentioned file is not found in your src, simply create it :)

2
  • Is this needed in a pure Vue3 app?
    – Kalnode
    Commented May 3 at 13:20
  • I'm rebuilding my app in Vue 3 to be purely based on the new version. The reason why I need the above is that I'm customizing a component in the Veutify library, but still not tested that component in Vue 3 (maybe we don't need this anymore). Commented May 6 at 14:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.