2

I am using EF Core 2.1 and I am trying to update multiple entities in one go by using Tasks (TPL):

public async Task UpdateAttendance(IEnumerable<MyEvents> events)
{
    try
    {
        var tasks = events.Select(async entity =>
        {
            await Task.Run(() => Context.Entry(entity).Property(x => x.Attendance).IsModified = true);
            await Context.SaveChangesAsync();
        });

        await Task.WhenAll(tasks);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        throw new Exception(ex.Message ?? ex.InnerException.Message);
    }
}

But this throwing the below error.

A second operation started on this context before a previous operation completed. Any instance members are not guaranteed to be thread safe.

Startup.cs

services.AddScoped<IMyRepository, MyRepository>();

How do I address this?

  • 2
    You really need change entity state async? Its does not make sense for me. – daremachine Feb 23 '19 at 16:55
  • Changing IsModified is not long-runnning! – Olivier Jacot-Descombes Feb 23 '19 at 16:57
  • 2
    I guess it's not a good idea to call SaveChanges many times. It's better to update all the entities and call it just one time. – Dmitry Stepanov Feb 23 '19 at 16:57
2

You can't do that. EF Core (as was EF 6 before) is not thread-safe.

You have to await a task before starting the next one

var tasks = events.Select(async entity =>
{
    await Task.Run(() => Context.Entry(entity).Property(x => x.Attendance).IsModified = true);
    await Context.SaveChangesAsync();
});

await Task.WhenAll(tasks);

Here you are starting multiple tasks in parallel and awaiting them. You will have to loop over it

foreach(var entity in events) 
{
    Context.Entry(entity).Property(x => x.Attendance).IsModified = true;
});
await Context.SaveChangesAsync();

It am not really sure why you want to save it event-by-event (hence, the example changed to do all the modified flags before calling SaveChangesAsync()), as its pretty inefficient. It makes more sense to update all of the properties, then run SaveChanges in the end, since EF Core will save all changed/tracked entities when you Save the Changes. Also easier to do a roll back when something goes wrong (Operation within SaveChangesAsync happens within a transaction scope)

| improve this answer | |
  • But neither I am getting any error nor the value is reflecting in Db – Kgn-web Feb 23 '19 at 17:29
  • Do you even have done changes to your model? :IsModify will only force an update of the model, but if the value before are unchanged you'll just see the same data as after the update – Tseng Feb 23 '19 at 17:31
  • Yes.while debug I have added quick watch & check the value of Attendace, I see the desired value – Kgn-web Feb 23 '19 at 17:32
  • Why do set it manually actually? Do the entities come in a detached state (i.e. via WebApi call)? Usually EF Core tracks changes automatically when fetched from database (and tracking isnt explicitly disabled) – Tseng Feb 23 '19 at 17:35
  • Sorry! I didn't get you. but here adding details. In the one request, I am fetching the Db Entitiy, doing some BL & attendance property is updated & then need to save it – Kgn-web Feb 23 '19 at 17:37
0

You could get multiple instances of DbContext, there are two ways to do that.

Using IServiceScopeFactory interface (Recommended)

In MyRepository:

private readonly IServiceScopeFactory serviceScopeFactory;
        public MyRepository(IServiceScopeFactory serviceScopeFactory)
        {
            this.serviceScopeFactory = serviceScopeFactory;
        }

        public async Task UpdateAttendance(IEnumerable<MyEvents> events)
        {
            try
            {
                var tasks = events.Select(async entity =>
                {
                    await Task.Run(() =>
                    {
                        using (var scope = serviceScopeFactory.CreateScope())
                        {
                            var context = scope.GetRequiredService<YourContextType>();
                            context.Entry(entity).Property(x => x.Attendance).IsModified = true;
                            await Context.SaveChangesAsync();
                        }
                    });
                });
                await Task.WhenAll(tasks);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                //You really should not do this, did you have a look to ILogger?
                //If you only wants to stop when an exception gets thrown you can configure VS to do that, Debug menu -> Windows -> Exception Settings
                throw new Exception(ex.Message ?? ex.InnerException.Message);
            }
        }

Or change the DbContext life time (scoped by default) to trasient

In Startup.cs:

services.AddDbContext<YourDbContext>(
    ServiceLifetime.Transient,
    options =>  options.UseSqlServer(Configuration.GetConnectionString("SomeConnectionStringName")));
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