249

I have a plot with two y-axes, using twinx(). I also give labels to the lines, and want to show them with legend(), but I only succeed to get the labels of one axis in the legend:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib import rc
rc('mathtext', default='regular')

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
ax.plot(time, Swdown, '-', label = 'Swdown')
ax.plot(time, Rn, '-', label = 'Rn')
ax2 = ax.twinx()
ax2.plot(time, temp, '-r', label = 'temp')
ax.legend(loc=0)
ax.grid()
ax.set_xlabel("Time (h)")
ax.set_ylabel(r"Radiation ($MJ\,m^{-2}\,d^{-1}$)")
ax2.set_ylabel(r"Temperature ($^\circ$C)")
ax2.set_ylim(0, 35)
ax.set_ylim(-20,100)
plt.show()

So I only get the labels of the first axis in the legend, and not the label 'temp' of the second axis. How could I add this third label to the legend?

enter image description here

  • 1
    [Don't do this in anywhere remotely close to any production code] When my only aim is to generate a beautiful plot with the appropiate legend ASAP, I use an ugly hack of plotting an empty array on ax with the style I use on ax2: in your case, ax.plot([], [], '-r', label = 'temp'). It's much faster and simpler than doing it properly... – Neinstein Apr 19 '18 at 12:36
308

You can easily add a second legend by adding the line:

ax2.legend(loc=0)

You'll get this:

enter image description here

But if you want all labels on one legend then you should do something like this:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib import rc
rc('mathtext', default='regular')

time = np.arange(10)
temp = np.random.random(10)*30
Swdown = np.random.random(10)*100-10
Rn = np.random.random(10)*100-10

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

lns1 = ax.plot(time, Swdown, '-', label = 'Swdown')
lns2 = ax.plot(time, Rn, '-', label = 'Rn')
ax2 = ax.twinx()
lns3 = ax2.plot(time, temp, '-r', label = 'temp')

# added these three lines
lns = lns1+lns2+lns3
labs = [l.get_label() for l in lns]
ax.legend(lns, labs, loc=0)

ax.grid()
ax.set_xlabel("Time (h)")
ax.set_ylabel(r"Radiation ($MJ\,m^{-2}\,d^{-1}$)")
ax2.set_ylabel(r"Temperature ($^\circ$C)")
ax2.set_ylim(0, 35)
ax.set_ylim(-20,100)
plt.show()

Which will give you this:

enter image description here

  • 20
    Thank you! This certainly will do it. I only find it's a bit unfortunate that matplotlib has no more automatic solution .. – joris Mar 31 '11 at 9:57
  • 2
    This fails with errorbar plots. For a solution that correctly handles them, see below: stackoverflow.com/a/10129461/1319447 – Davide Nov 17 '15 at 15:02
  • To prevent two overlapping legends as in my case where I specifed two .legend(loc=0), you should specify two different values for the legend location value (both other than 0). See: matplotlib.org/api/legend_api.html – Roalt Jan 4 '16 at 14:12
  • I had some trouble adding a single line to some subplot with multiple lines ax1. In this case use lns1=ax1.lines and then append lns2 to this list. – Little Bobby Tables Jul 12 '17 at 12:01
  • The different values used by loc are explained here – Dror Jul 18 '17 at 9:46
155

I'm not sure if this functionality is new, but you can also use the get_legend_handles_labels() method rather than keeping track of lines and labels yourself:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib import rc
rc('mathtext', default='regular')

pi = np.pi

# fake data
time = np.linspace (0, 25, 50)
temp = 50 / np.sqrt (2 * pi * 3**2) \
        * np.exp (-((time - 13)**2 / (3**2))**2) + 15
Swdown = 400 / np.sqrt (2 * pi * 3**2) * np.exp (-((time - 13)**2 / (3**2))**2)
Rn = Swdown - 10

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

ax.plot(time, Swdown, '-', label = 'Swdown')
ax.plot(time, Rn, '-', label = 'Rn')
ax2 = ax.twinx()
ax2.plot(time, temp, '-r', label = 'temp')

# ask matplotlib for the plotted objects and their labels
lines, labels = ax.get_legend_handles_labels()
lines2, labels2 = ax2.get_legend_handles_labels()
ax2.legend(lines + lines2, labels + labels2, loc=0)

ax.grid()
ax.set_xlabel("Time (h)")
ax.set_ylabel(r"Radiation ($MJ\,m^{-2}\,d^{-1}$)")
ax2.set_ylabel(r"Temperature ($^\circ$C)")
ax2.set_ylim(0, 35)
ax.set_ylim(-20,100)
plt.show()
  • 1
    This is the only solution that can handle axes where the plots overlap with the legends (the last axes is the one that should plot the legends) – Amelio Vazquez-Reina Dec 3 '14 at 2:43
  • 5
    This solution also works with errorbar plots, while the accepted one fails (showing a line and its errorbars separately, and none of them with the right label). Plus, it's simpler. – Davide Nov 17 '15 at 15:00
  • slight catch: it doesn't work if you want to overwrite the label for ax2 and it doesn't have one set from the start – Ciprian Tomoiagă May 7 '17 at 23:56
  • Thank you, this works for scatter plots aswell. – arie64 Jun 15 '17 at 23:28
  • Remark: For classic plots, you don't need to specify the label argument. But for others, eg. bars you need to. – belka Feb 14 at 9:26
50

From matplotlib version 2.1 onwards, you may use a figure legend. Instead of ax.legend(), which produces a legend with the handles from the axes ax, one can create a figure legend

fig.legend(loc="upper right")

which will gather all handles from all subplots in the figure. Since it is a figure legend, it will be placed at the corner of the figure, and the loc argument is relative to the figure.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

x = np.linspace(0,10)
y = np.linspace(0,10)
z = np.sin(x/3)**2*98

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
ax.plot(x,y, '-', label = 'Quantity 1')

ax2 = ax.twinx()
ax2.plot(x,z, '-r', label = 'Quantity 2')
fig.legend(loc="upper right")

ax.set_xlabel("x [units]")
ax.set_ylabel(r"Quantity 1")
ax2.set_ylabel(r"Quantity 2")

plt.show()

enter image description here

In order to place the legend back into the axes, one would supply a bbox_to_anchor and a bbox_transform. The latter would be the axes transform of the axes the legend should reside in. The former may be the coordinates of the edge defined by loc given in axes coordinates.

fig.legend(loc="upper right", bbox_to_anchor=(1,1), bbox_transform=ax.transAxes)

enter image description here

  • So, version 2.1 already released? But in Anaconda 3, I tried conda upgrade matplotlib no newer versions found, I'm still using v.2.0.2 – StayFoolish Dec 28 '17 at 2:29
  • 1
    This is a cleaner way of achieving the end result. – Goutham Apr 10 '18 at 14:11
  • 1
    beautiful and pythonic – DanGoodrick Jul 16 at 15:06
35

You can easily get what you want by adding the line in ax:

ax.plot([], [], '-r', label = 'temp')

or

ax.plot(np.nan, '-r', label = 'temp')

This would plot nothing but add a label to legend of ax.

I think this is a much easier way. It's not necessary to track lines automatically when you have only a few lines in the second axes, as fixing by hand like above would be quite easy. Anyway, it depends on what you need.

The whole code is as below:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from matplotlib import rc
rc('mathtext', default='regular')

time = np.arange(22.)
temp = 20*np.random.rand(22)
Swdown = 10*np.random.randn(22)+40
Rn = 40*np.random.rand(22)

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
ax2 = ax.twinx()

#---------- look at below -----------

ax.plot(time, Swdown, '-', label = 'Swdown')
ax.plot(time, Rn, '-', label = 'Rn')

ax2.plot(time, temp, '-r')  # The true line in ax2
ax.plot(np.nan, '-r', label = 'temp')  # Make an agent in ax

ax.legend(loc=0)

#---------------done-----------------

ax.grid()
ax.set_xlabel("Time (h)")
ax.set_ylabel(r"Radiation ($MJ\,m^{-2}\,d^{-1}$)")
ax2.set_ylabel(r"Temperature ($^\circ$C)")
ax2.set_ylim(0, 35)
ax.set_ylim(-20,100)
plt.show()

The plot is as below:

enter image description here


Update: add a better version:

ax.plot(np.nan, '-r', label = 'temp')

This will do nothing while plot(0, 0) may change the axis range.


One extra example for scatter

ax.scatter([], [], s=100, label = 'temp')  # Make an agent in ax
ax2.scatter(time, temp, s=10)  # The true scatter in ax2

ax.legend(loc=1, framealpha=1)
  • 3
    I like this. Its kind of ugly in the way it "tricks" the system, but so simple to implement. – Daniel Power Nov 21 '14 at 14:30
  • This is really simple to implement. But when using this with scatter, the resulting scatter size in the legend is just a tiny point. – greeeeeeen Sep 12 at 11:18
  • @greeeeeeen Then you just should specify the marker size when making the scatter plot :-) – Syrtis Major Sep 13 at 11:13
  • @SyrtisMajor I, of course, tried that. But that didn't change the marker size in the legend. – greeeeeeen Sep 14 at 15:59
  • @greeeeeeen Have you changed the marker size of the agent scatter? See my post, I added a snippet of example code. – Syrtis Major Sep 16 at 4:58
6

A quick hack that may suit your needs..

Take off the frame of the box and manually position the two legends next to each other. Something like this..

ax1.legend(loc = (.75,.1), frameon = False)
ax2.legend( loc = (.75, .05), frameon = False)

Where the loc tuple is left-to-right and bottom-to-top percentages that represent the location in the chart.

5

I found an following official matplotlib example that uses host_subplot to display multiple y-axes and all the different labels in one legend. No workaround necessary. Best solution I found so far. http://matplotlib.org/examples/axes_grid/demo_parasite_axes2.html

from mpl_toolkits.axes_grid1 import host_subplot
import mpl_toolkits.axisartist as AA
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

host = host_subplot(111, axes_class=AA.Axes)
plt.subplots_adjust(right=0.75)

par1 = host.twinx()
par2 = host.twinx()

offset = 60
new_fixed_axis = par2.get_grid_helper().new_fixed_axis
par2.axis["right"] = new_fixed_axis(loc="right",
                                    axes=par2,
                                    offset=(offset, 0))

par2.axis["right"].toggle(all=True)

host.set_xlim(0, 2)
host.set_ylim(0, 2)

host.set_xlabel("Distance")
host.set_ylabel("Density")
par1.set_ylabel("Temperature")
par2.set_ylabel("Velocity")

p1, = host.plot([0, 1, 2], [0, 1, 2], label="Density")
p2, = par1.plot([0, 1, 2], [0, 3, 2], label="Temperature")
p3, = par2.plot([0, 1, 2], [50, 30, 15], label="Velocity")

par1.set_ylim(0, 4)
par2.set_ylim(1, 65)

host.legend()

plt.draw()
plt.show()
  • Welcome to Stack Overflow! Please quote the most relevant part of the link, in case the target site is unreachable or goes permanently offline. See How do I write a good answer. Focus on more current questions in the future, this one is nearly 4 years old. – ByteHamster Mar 5 '15 at 15:32
  • Indeed a good find but I wish you would have taken what you learned from the example, applied it to the OP's MWE, and included an image. – aeroNotAuto Nov 8 '17 at 21:32

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