65

Suppose I write 0.5 as 0.-5 in unexpected way, but it can still run. What does 0. in 0.-5 do so that it can still run and evaluates to -5?

I also tried alert(0.-5+1) which prints -4, does JavaScript ignore 0. in 0.-5?

  • 53
    0. is like 0.0. Or just 0. – Ry- Feb 25 at 3:48
  • 61
    What makes you think that 0.-5 is an "unexpected way"? – Nico Haase Feb 25 at 9:28
  • 13
    @NicoHaase: I'm pretty sure the OP used "unexpected way" to mean "I did not intend/expect to write that, but somehow I did". – Filip Milovanović Feb 25 at 9:54
  • 13
    This works in many other languages too (e.g. Python). I personally don't like it at all. I'd rather have 0.-5 be a syntax error and not allow float literals with a trailing period but force people to write .0 at the end. – Giacomo Alzetta Feb 25 at 13:22
  • 8
    It's especially bad because allowing numbers to end in . prevents you from writing something like 123.toString(16) (A common trick is to use 123..toString(16), which is really (123.).toString(16)) – 12Me21 Feb 25 at 23:26
168

Trailing digits after a . are optional:

console.log(0. === 0); // true

So

0.-5

evalutes to

0 - 5

which is just -5. Similarly,

0.-5+1

is

0 - 5 + 1

which is

-5 + 1

or -4.

  • 9
    Leading digits are also optional, so .0-5 is also valid – icenac Feb 26 at 15:13
43

0.-5 could be successfully parsed as 0.[1], - and 5. Below is the abstract syntax tree for the expression generated by AST explorer:

Parse tree generated by AST explorer

This (in an unexpected way) is valid JavaScript and evaluates to -5.


[1] According to the grammar for numeric literals the decimal digits and exponent parts are optional:

NumericLiteral ::
  DecimalLiteral
  [...]

DecimalLiteral ::
  DecimalIntegerLiteral . DecimalDigitsopt ExponentPartopt

  • 6
    And what is wrong with that? – Salman A Feb 25 at 10:18
  • how did you extract the AST? – koλzar Feb 26 at 10:38
  • 6
    Go to astexplorer.net, choose a language and a parser, paste the code, choose JSON output (or just take a screenshot). – Salman A Feb 26 at 10:45
  • oh wow, very nice. Thank you – koλzar Feb 26 at 10:49
36

In JS you can express a number with optional decimal point.

x = 5.;    //5
x = 5. + 6.   //11

And as of Tvde1's comment, any Number method can be applied too.

5..toString()

This syntax let us run the Number functions without parentheses.

5.toString() //error
(5).toString() //good
5..toString() //good
5 .toString() // awesome

See this question to find out why.

  • 3
    You can even do 5..toString(). – Tvde1 Feb 25 at 6:15
  • 2
    If fact, you have to do 5..toString() to call the method, otherwise, you have to use parenthesis: (5).toString() – jo_va Feb 25 at 9:49
  • 3
    @PeterMortensen Ruby, for one. Also ALGOL 68. In Common Lisp, weirdly enough, 1.0 is floating point but 1. is an integer. – Sneftel Feb 25 at 13:14
  • 2
    @FlorianF You wouldn't, but that doesn't mean the parser should be special-cased to reject it. floats have methods, and 5. is a float. – chepner Feb 25 at 19:58
  • 2
    @MasonWheeler It's certainly not the case that any other language where (1).toMethod() is legal prohibits (1.) from parsing properly. The most traditional approach to parsing (greedy lexing of tokens, including literals, then parsing) produces the Javascript behavior. – Sneftel Feb 26 at 10:29
8

I would think that the real answer is not about the decimal point, but is about the minus sign: isn't that going to be interpreted as an operator if it is preceded by anything that looks like a number?

  • 1
    Then, at least in some point of view, it still is about the decimal point being interpreted as part of a number literal, otherwise what preceded the minus sign wouldn't "looks like a number". – Pac0 Feb 26 at 1:19
6

console.log(0. - 5)      // -5
console.log(0 - 5)       // -5
console.log('0.' - 5)    // -5
console.log('0' - 5)     // -5
console.log(0.-5 === -5) // true

'0.' or '0' is the same in JavaScript because the type is unique for numbers, called Number. The minus operator is between Numbers, try always to convert what you pass to a Number. In Python is different first is a Float and the second an Integer because it has several types.

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