1

This question already has an answer here:

I'm writing a class which holds variables of different types (let's say std::string and keyword_map) and which is supposed to have a value() function that returns either the string or the keyword_map value once it is called via template initialization retval = object.value<std::string>(). So far the function looks like this:

template <class T>
T value()
{
    if (std::is_same<T, std::string>::value) {
        return str_;
    }
    else if (std::is_same<T, keyword_map>::value) {
        return obj_;
    }
    else {
        return 0;
    }
}

Compiling it throws me following error: error C2440: 'return': cannot convert from 'example_class::keyword_map' to 'std::basic_string<char,std::char_traits<char>,std::allocator<char>>' (compiling source file ..\..\example_files\example_class.cpp)

Is it possible I'll have to convert my return value to the template return type via static_cast or sth like that?

marked as duplicate by πάντα ῥεῖ c++ Feb 25 at 9:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    The type-checking is done at compile-time, and all paths through a function must be valid for the code to compile. You may want to consider specialization to handle the special cases. – Some programmer dude Feb 25 at 9:55
  • Or perhaps better yet, use std::variant or maybe even std::any (if your compiler supports them, if not consider the Boost implementations of those instead). – Some programmer dude Feb 25 at 9:58
  • Also note that 0 might not make sense all types. Do you have control over how this function will be called? Or will it be part of a library? How will you handle a case where 0 can't be converted to the type T? – Some programmer dude Feb 25 at 10:13
  • 1
    return 0; was just an example way to explain my problem. I guess I'll go for an exception in the actual code. – taiBsu Feb 25 at 10:29
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You can use constexpr if (since C++17).

If the value is true, then statement-false is discarded (if present), otherwise, statement-true is discarded.

e.g.

template <class T>
T value()
{
    if constexpr (std::is_same<T, std::string>::value) {
        return str_;
    }
    else if constexpr (std::is_same<T, keyword_map>::value) {
        return obj_;
    }
    else {
        return 0;
    }
}

Before C++17, you can apply template specialization.

template <class T>
T value()
{
    return 0;
}

template <>
std::string value<std::string>()
{
    return str_;
}

template <>
keyword_map value<keyword_map>()
{
    return obj_;
}

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