9

I have a list of available items that I can use to create a new list with a total length of 4. The length of the available item list never exceeds 4 items. If the list has less than 4 elements I want to populate it with the available elements beginning at the start element.

Example 1:

available_items = [4, 2]
Result -> [4, 2, 4, 2]

Example 2:

available_items = [9, 3, 12]
Result -> [9, 3, 12, 9]

Example 3:

available_items = [3]
Result -> [3, 3, 3, 3]

I have the feeling that my solution is not optimal, but I have found nothing better so far:

available_items = [3, 5]
required_items = 4

if len(available_items) == 1:
  new_items = [available_items[0]] * required_items
else:
  new_items = available_items + []
  for i in range(required_items - len(available_items)):
    new_items.append(available_items[i])

print(new_items)

11 Answers 11

7

You can use itertools.cycle

Ex:

from itertools import cycle

available_items_1 = cycle([4, 2])
available_items_2 = cycle([9, 3, 12])
available_items_3 = cycle([3])

n = 4

print([next(available_items_1)for i in range(n)])
print([next(available_items_2)for i in range(n)])
print([next(available_items_3)for i in range(n)])

Output:

[4, 2, 4, 2]
[9, 3, 12, 9]
[3, 3, 3, 3]
5

Alternative solution using some integer math instead of imports:

def repeat_items(l, c):
    return l * (c // len(l)) + l[:(c % len(l))]

>>> repeat_items([1, 2, 3], 4)
[1, 2, 3, 1]

Avoids duplicating more elements than necessary (which is particularly beneficial if len(l) is large and c is small).

Caution: does not check for empty lists

  • 1
    I like this because it takes less computational effort than iterating c times but also does not make a list bigger than necessary. – jdehesa Feb 25 at 10:43
3

A nice one-liner (omitting the necessity of any imports) would be:

[available_items * required_items][0][:required_items]

Testing it on your example lists we get the results you desire

required_items = 4

available_items = [4, 2]
[available_items * required_items][0][:required_items]
# Result -> [4, 2, 4, 2]

available_items = [9, 3, 12]
[available_items * required_items][0][:required_items]
# Result -> [9, 3, 12, 9]

available_items = [3, 3, 3, 3]
[available_items * required_items][0][:required_items]
# Result -> [3, 3, 3, 3]
3

try this:

lst1=[4,2]
lst2=[9, 3, 12]
lst3=[3]
no_item=4
print([lst1[i%len(lst1)] for i in range(no_item)])
print([lst2[i%len(lst2)] for i in range(no_item)])
print([lst3[i%len(lst3)] for i in range(no_item)])
2

It is simpler always multiply your inputs and limit the result. Example 1:

>> available_items = [4, 2]
>> Result = available_items * 4
>> Result = Result[0:4]
>> Result
[4, 2, 4, 2]

Example 2:

>> available_items = [9, 3, 12]
>> Result = available_items * 4
>> Result = Result[0:4]
>> Result
[9, 3, 12, 9]

Example 3:

>> available_items = [3]
>> Result = available_items * 4
>> Result = Result[0:4]
>> Result
[3, 3, 3, 3]
2
def solve(arr):
    res = []
    req = 4-len(arr)

    while req>0:
      for i in range(len(arr)):
        res.append(arr[i])
        req = req-1
        if req == 0:
          break

    return arr+res

num = [4, 2]
res_num = solve(num)
print(res_num)

num = [9, 3, 12]
res_num = solve(num)
print(res_num)

num = [3]
res_num = solve(num)
print(res_num)

Output:

[4, 2, 4, 2]
[9, 3, 12, 9]
[3, 3, 3, 3]
2

Here is another oneliner :

result = (available_items * (int(required_items /len(available_items ))+1))[:required_items]

This should work irrespective of required_items and available_items.

2

Using itertools.cycle, you could do:

from itertools import cycle

available_items = [3, 5]
required_items = 4

[item for item, idx in zip(cycle(available_items), range(required_items))]

# [3, 5, 3, 5]
2

Just repeat the list 4 times and cut it down to 4 elements:

>>> i = [4, 2]
>>> (i * 4)[:4]
[4, 2, 4, 2]
2

You could use itertools.cycle and itertools.islice to create the required list. list(islice(cycle(available_items), 4))

>>> lst = [1]; list(islice(cycle(lst), 4)) == [1,1,1,1]
>>> lst = [1,3]; list(islice(cycle(lst), 4)) == [1,3,1,3]
>>> lst = [1,3,2]; list(islice(cycle(lst), 4)) == [1,3,2,1]
>>> lst = [1,3,2,4]; list(islice(cycle(lst), 4)) == [1,3,2,4]
1

Here's my try

available_items = [3, 5, 9]
required_items = 4

times = 4 // len(available_items)
remain = 4 % len(available_items)

new_items = (available_items * times ) + available_items[:remain]
print(available_items)
print(new_items)

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