5

Let's say I have the following struct:

struct Point {
    double X,Y,Z;
};

and the following vector:

std::vector<Point> v;
// populate v with random points

Now, I want to call something like collect(v, X) and get a std::vector that contains the X values from the original struct vector in it, for example:

v.push_back(Point{1.0, 2.0,  3.0});
v.push_back(Point{1.1, 0.0, -0.5});
auto ans = collect(v,X);
// ans = [1.0, 1.1]

I think this is a pretty common task, and I'm sure there's a good name for this that I couldn't come up with while asking (feel free to point me out!).

I can do this:

std::vector<double> collectX(std::vector<Point> v) {
    std::vector<double> output;
    for (auto elem : v) {
        output.push_back(elem.X);
    }
}
/* Repeat for each field the struct Point has... */

I know C++ has no reflection. I was wondering if there's a workaround for this? As you may imagine, the struct I am working with doesn't have just 3 fields, so writing a method for each fields is a bit daunting and inelegant.

5

so writing a method for each fields is a bit daunting and inelegant

An immediate fix for that is to pass the field identifier as an argument too.

std::vector<double> collect(double Point::* f, std::vector<Point> const& v) {
    std::vector<double> output;
    for (auto const& elem : v) {
        output.push_back(elem.*f);
    }
    return output;
}

To be called like this:

collect(&Point::X, v);

If the types aren't always double, then the above can easily be made a template over the member type:

template<typename T>
std::vector<T> collect(T Point::* f, std::vector<Point> const& v) {
    std::vector<T> output;
    for (auto const& elem : v) {
        output.push_back(elem.*f);
    }
    return output;
}

And finally, the term you are looking for this sort of extraction is "projection". I.e, what one gets when projecting a function onto an axis, very roughly speaking. In our case, the function maps an index of the vector to a Point, and the projection is onto the x axis, as it were.

It can also be written on the fly with the C++ standard library, or with the ranges-v3 library. Projection is a very common operation with ranges of items, so many range-centric libraries will have the facilities to do it.

1

You can use std::transform and std::back_inserter for that.

std::vector<Point> v;
v.push_back(Point{1.0, 2.0,  3.0});
v.push_back(Point{1.1, 0.0, -0.5});

std::vector<double> x;

std::transform(v.begin(), v.end(), std::back_inserter(x),
               [](Point const& p) -> double { return p.x; });
1

Use std::transform, std::back_inserter, and std::mem_fn:

#include <functional>
//...
std::vector<Point> v{{0,1,2},{9,8,7}};

std::vector<double> x;

std::transform(v.begin(), v.end(), std::back_inserter(x),
           std::mem_fn(&Point::x));

Compilers can typically optimize away the indirection behind std::mem_fn.

0

A range-v3 + macro solution, usable for all fields and types:

#define view_extract_field(fname) (view::transform([](const auto& val) { return val.fname; }))

auto vx = v | view_extract_field(X) | to_vector;
  • 2
    No macro please: auto vx = v | view::transform(&Point::x); is good. (the to_vector part is not always required btw, once we work with range, to still be "lazy"). – Jarod42 Feb 26 at 12:22
0

You can use a template for this kind of stuff

template<typename C, typename F>
auto vmap(F f, const C& c) -> std::vector<decltype(f(*c.begin()))> {
    std::vector<decltype(f(*c.begin()))> res;
    for (auto& x : c) res.push_back(f(x));
    return res;
}

used as

auto x_values = vmap([](const Point& p){ return p.x; }, pts);

vmap(f, c) returns a std::vector of whatever f applied to the elements of c returns, and c is any standard container.

To extract x I'm using as f a lambda [](const Point& p){ return p.x; }.

0

This does not answer your question directly. If you are concerned about performance and are required to perform this split often it is perhaps useful to consider a different storage design.

class Points {
  public:
    //Constructor ...
    std::vector<double> & getX() const;
  private:
    std::vector<double> x; 
    std::vector<double> y;
    std::vector<double> z;
};

std::vector<double> & Points::getX() {
    return x;
}

In this way you do not have to copy the x-values of your points (which might be a very large amount of memory) and you will have fast access to them. On the other hand, to cache locality of one point will get worse. So If you have performance trouble measure, where you have them and then this might be an idea.

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