0

Here is a simple code that I tried to use a self-reference type and using alias at the same time.

#include <iostream>
class List {
private:
    struct node {
        int data;
        struct node* next;

        node(const int& d=0, struct node* n=nullptr) {
            data = d; next = n;
        }
        ~node() {};
    };
    using pNode = struct node*;
    pNode head;

public:
    List();
    ~List();
    void print() const { std::cout << head->data; }
};

List::List() {
    head = new node{55};
}

int main() {
  List *a = new List;
  a->print();
}

This above works fine. However, I'd rather start the code as shown below:

class List {
private:
    using pNode = struct node*;
    struct node {
        int data;
        pNode next;
    ...

I'd like to place using pNode = struct node* before the struct node definition such that I can use it inside struct node definition as well. I believe that this style of code works fine if I don't use class.

  • 1
    Avoid adding typedefs for pointer types. const pNode and const node* are very different. – jamesdlin Feb 26 at 7:17
7

Don't hide pointer semantics in an alias. It's the one "never" advice I always get behind.

And if you agree to only ever use node* in your code, then you can just write

struct node {
    int data;
    node* next;
    // ..
};

C++ introduces a type named node with struct node, unlike C. So we can use natural syntax.

-1

To use the latter you need to forward declare the struct node like so:

struct node;
using pNode = node*;
struct node {
    int data;
    pNode next;
};
  • Don't encourage the hiding of pointer semantics. – Swordfish Feb 26 at 7:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.