1

I wrote simple class and define one copy constructor. Then add friend equal comparison operator and compare int with Int

template <class T>
class Int {
public:
    T value;
    Int(const T& value_) : value(value_) {
        ;
    }

    friend bool operator==(const Int<T>& f, const Int<T>& s) {
        return f.value == s.value;
    }
};

int main() {
    int a;
    Int<int> x(a);
    x == a;
}

Compiled successfully.

If I turn the friend bool operator==(const Int<T>& f, const Int<T>& s); into a non-friend template. I get a compiler error:

error: no match for 'operator==' (operand types are 'int' and 'Int<int>'
template <class T>
class Int {
public:
    T value;
    Int(const T& value_) : value(value_) {
        ;
    }
};

template <class T>
bool operator==(const Int<T>& f, const Int<T>& s) {
    return f.value == s.value;
}

int main() {
    int a;
    Int<int> x(a);
    x == a;
}

Does it mean that friend functions allow specific conversions?

5 == x works too.

1

Does the c++ friend keyword mean more then access to private?

Depending on context, it can have more implications, yes. For instance, a friend function defined inline, with no other declaration, can only be found by argument dependent lookup, even though it's a member of the enclosing namespace:

namespace foo {
    struct bar {
        friend void baz(bar const&) {}
    };
}

int main() {
    foo::bar bar;
    // foo::baz(bar); // ill-formed, no member baz in foo
    baz(bar); // Okay, it *can* be found by ADL
};

That is not directly related to your question, but that is how the friend operator== is looked up. And that said friend is also not a template itself. When you instantiate Int<int>, this "injects" a free operator== function - which is, again, not a template - into the namespace Int is a member of. When that operator function is looked up (by ADL) for the purposes of doing x == a, the compiler will happily consider implicitly converting a to Int<int>, because we can do implicit conversions to match regular free functions.

And speaking of conversions...

I wrote simple class and define one copy constructor.

You did not. That is a user-defined constructor taking an int const& argument, not an Int<int> const& like a copy constructor would take. You defined a converting constructor (because it's not explicit), which is exactly how the compiler can convert a to Int<int> above.

If I turn...

In your second version the operator is a template. It's still looked up by ADL. But template argument deduction only considers the exact type of the arguments. I.e, both arguments to operator== must be directly able to bind to Int<T> const& for some T. An int cannot be bound directly to Int<int> const&, it requires a conversion. So it doesn't match the sort of argument the template needs to do template argument deduction. Therefore the template cannot be instantiated, and is not a candidate.

Does it mean that friend functions allows specific conversions?

No, it's not the friendship. It's the template vs non-template business. You can define an operator== without friendship, but it has to be per-instantiation of Int:

template <class T>
class Int {
public:
    T value;
    Int(const T& value_) : value(value_) {
        ;
    }
};

bool operator==(const Int<int>& f, const Int<int>& s) {
    return f.value == s.value;
}

That will make your main well-formed too. But as you noticed, it's not very useful having to declare those individually, so many code bases will use the friend version to "inject" this free function automatically.

  • 1
    Congrats on your 100k!!! – YSC Feb 27 at 10:57
  • @YSC - Many thanks! ^_^ Now to figure out what to do with the rest of my life :) – StoryTeller Feb 27 at 11:00
  • 1
    Il faut cultiver notre jardin. – YSC Feb 27 at 11:31

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