1

I am trying to vectorize a threshold on a slice in a 3D array. Unfortunately, the threshold is being applied to all 3 values in the dimension. The only way I can think of is to extract slice 1, process that then put it back into the array but I'm sure there is a better way. Here is some code to explain what I'm doing and what I'm trying to do. Thank you very much for any assistance. J

import numpy as np
arr = np.arange(18).reshape(3, 2, 3)
arr[ arr[:,:,1] < 10 ] = 0

Gives :

array([[[ 0,  0,  0],
        [ 0,  0,  0]],

       [[ 0,  0,  0],
        [ 9, 10, 11]],

       [[12, 13, 14],
        [15, 16, 17]]])

I was hoping for :

array([[[ 0,  0,  2],
        [ 3,  0,  5]],

       [[ 6,  0,  8],
        [ 9, 10, 11]],

       [[12, 13, 14],
        [15, 16, 17]]])
  • Is your threshold 10 or 20? – Paul H Feb 26 at 17:55
  • Thanks @PaulH, yes, typo in my simplification of the original problem – Johned Feb 27 at 12:00
  • In the future, you should edit your question to remove such errors – Paul H Feb 28 at 15:11
  • Thanks Paul, yes, you are correct. My apologies. – Johned Mar 1 at 17:15
4

This should work:

arr[:, :, 1][arr[:, :, 1] < 10] = 0

This will create a boolean mask for the second element of dimension 3 of arr with: arr[:, :, 1] < 10. This boolean mask is then used to only index its specific array slice.

A nice feature to make selections of the last dimension more readable is the ellipsis .... It will slice all axes before the explicitly indexed axis.

print(arr[..., 1])
# Out: array([[ 1,  4],
              [ 7, 10],
              [13, 16]])

In this case, you can for example use it like this:

slc = (..., 1)
arr[slc][arr[slc] < 10] = 0
  • slc = (..., 1) Is that new? I fully expected a syntax error here. Pity it doesn't work with slice notation in general. Still, I find slc = arr[..., 1] slc[slc<10] = 0 a bit more elegant. – Paul Panzer Feb 26 at 18:32
  • Honestly: I don't know since how long it has been implemented, but I guess it is at least two years. What do you mean with slice notation in general? In my special case, I re-use indices several times for many different arrays of the same shape. Thus I tend to store the indices as in slc = (..., 1) or slc = (slice(1, 2), slice(2, 10, 2)) while naming the extracted views with somethin like arr_view, but I guess this is just personal preference. :) – Scotty1- Feb 26 at 18:43
  • 1
    I meant things like slc = (:, :, 1) still don't seem to work. Btw., in case you are not aware of it, you can write slc = np.s_[1:2, 2:10:2] for your second example. np.s_ is I believe a hack that hijacks the __getitem__ method to intercept any legal indexing expression. I find it a bit more intuitive than explicitly writing slice(1, 2) etc. but it's presumably a mattter of taste. – Paul Panzer Feb 26 at 18:55
  • Oh cool, in fact I was not aware of being able to use np.s_. Many thanks, I'll definetely use it several times. Yep, having the possibility to store slices using slice notation would be a nice feature... – Scotty1- Feb 26 at 19:15
  • 1
    Thanks @Scotty1-. I really appreciate the answer and the suggestion of the ellipsis notation. It took me a good hour of playing with code to get my head around it all. :-) – Johned Feb 27 at 12:03
4

We can simply use the mask of comparisons to index along the first two axes and use the slicing on the last axis, giving us a compact way like so -

arr[arr[:,:,1]<10, 1] = 0

Sample run -

In [47]: arr = np.arange(18).reshape(3, 2, 3)

In [48]: arr[arr[:,:,1] <10,1] = 0

In [49]: arr
Out[49]: 
array([[[ 0,  0,  2],
        [ 3,  0,  5]],

       [[ 6,  0,  8],
        [ 9, 10, 11]],

       [[12, 13, 14],
        [15, 16, 17]]])
  • This is a really nice solution, but timings show that it is 35% slower than arr[arr[:,:,1]<10, 1] = 0. It seems like additional array copies are made somewhere in this solution. – Scotty1- Feb 26 at 18:24
  • @Scotty1- Yeah I could verify those. Think it's the difference between slicing and masking in one step shown in this post versus slicing and then masking, so the masking has to work on a smaller data and the latter is winning because of it. Thanks for pointing it out. – Divakar Feb 26 at 18:29
  • Oh right, this seems more reasonable. – Scotty1- Feb 26 at 18:32
  • I found both solutions (@Scotty1- and @Divakar) intuitive (and to me, instructive). Upvoted both! But @Scotty, your comment about "35% slower than arr[arr[:,:,1]<10, 1] = 0" confuses me. How can a solution be slower than itself? Is there a typo error in that comment? – fountainhead Feb 27 at 1:30
  • @fountainhead He meant between mine and his, i.e. between arr[arr[:,:,1]<10, 1] and arr[:, :, 1][arr[:, :, 1] < 10]. – Divakar Feb 27 at 4:13

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