193

In dart there any equivalent to the common:

enumerate(List) -> Iterator((index, value) => f)
or 
List.enumerate()  -> Iterator((index, value) => f)
or 
List.map() -> Iterator((index, value) => f)

It seems that this is the easiest way but it still seems strange that this functionality wouldn't exist.

Iterable<int>.generate(list.length).forEach( (index) => {
  newList.add(list[index], index)
});
5

14 Answers 14

283

There is a asMap method which converts the list to a map where the keys are the index and values are the element at index. Please take a look at the docs here.

Example:

List _sample = ['a','b','c'];
_sample.asMap().forEach((index, value) => f);
6
  • 40
    Quite disappointing for a JS dev, that there's a need for "conversion" here to iterate through a list with index Feb 22, 2021 at 6:43
  • 2
    map() is supposed to return a value so that that one type of list is transformed into a new list type. forEach() returns void. You might as well only use forEach(). May 1, 2021 at 14:37
  • @user2233706 asMap is different that map. map iterated through an Iterable and maps it to the return type of mapper function. asMap converts Iterable to a Map<int,IterableTYpe>. The forEach is applied on the Map returned by asMap May 4, 2021 at 4:56
  • 3
    I get a feeling this doesn't guarantee ordering. Does it?
    – sleighty
    Aug 19, 2021 at 19:53
  • 3
    @sleighty It guarantees ordering. As stated in the .asMap documentation: The Map.keys Iterable iterates the indices of this list in numerical order.
    – jamesdlin
    Mar 24, 2022 at 5:35
164

You can use the mapIndexed or forEachIndexed extension methods from the collection package. Note that unlike javascript's array.map() or C#'s IEnumerable.Select(), the index is the first argument, not the second argument of the callback:

import 'package:collection/collection.dart';

void main() {
  final inputs = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f'];
  final indexes = inputs.mapIndexed((index, element) => index).toList();
  
  inputs.forEachIndexed((index, element) {
    print('index: $index, element: $element');
  });

  print(indexes);
}

Live Demo


Old answer

Starting with Dart 2.7, you can use extension methods to extend the functionalities of Iterable instead of having to write helper functions:

extension ExtendedIterable<E> on Iterable<E> {
  /// Like Iterable<T>.map but the callback has index as second argument
  Iterable<T> mapIndexed<T>(T Function(E e, int i) f) {
    var i = 0;
    return map((e) => f(e, i++));
  }

  void forEachIndexed(void Function(E e, int i) f) {
    var i = 0;
    forEach((e) => f(e, i++));
  }
}

Usage:

final inputs = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f'];
final results = inputs
  .mapIndexed((e, i) => 'item: $e, index: $i')
  .toList()
  .join('\n');

print(results);

// item: a, index: 0
// item: b, index: 1
// item: c, index: 2
// item: d, index: 3
// item: e, index: 4
// item: f, index: 5
inputs.forEachIndexed((e, i) => print('item: $e, index: $i'));

// item: a, index: 0
// item: b, index: 1
// item: c, index: 2
// item: d, index: 3
// item: e, index: 4
// item: f, index: 5

Live Demo

9
  • 18
    this is the best answer, this even works with Flutter items where you could return Widgets not just String.
    – STEEL
    Sep 30, 2020 at 15:21
  • 1
    @IWantAnswers E and T represents the type of the item in the original array/output array respectively, because you can map to an array with different type. For example, if you write a function that get all names from a list of Widget, it'd be widgetList.mapIndex(w => getName(w)) where widgetList is List<Widget> and the result is List<String> Feb 13, 2021 at 18:33
  • 1
    @IWantAnswers the increment happens every time after the callback (e) => f(e, i++) is evaluated. If i starts at -1, it'd need to be ++i. e.g. the increment happens before the callback is evaluated. Feb 13, 2021 at 18:40
  • 2
    Still disappointed for this is not builtin in dart.
    – John Wang
    Jun 17, 2021 at 10:53
  • 1
    @JohnWang you can use the collection package now which is developed by dart team, the best part is that it's also used by flutter so you don't have to install it, just import the package and use the .forEachIndexed or .mapIndexed variants. My answer was updated with an example for reference. Oct 30, 2021 at 2:32
47

There is no built-in function to get the iteration index.

If like me you don't like the idea to build a Map (the data structure) just for a simple index, what you probably want is a map (the function) which gives you the index. Let's call it mapIndexed (like in Kotlin):

children: mapIndexed(
  list,
  (index, item) => Text("event_$index")
).toList();

The implementation of mapIndexed is simple:

Iterable<E> mapIndexed<E, T>(
    Iterable<T> items, E Function(int index, T item) f) sync* {
  var index = 0;

  for (final item in items) {
    yield f(index, item);
    index = index + 1;
  }
}
6
  • 1
    This is a good answer but would probably be better written as a synchronous generator
    – David Rees
    Aug 7, 2019 at 0:55
  • 2
    @DavidRees thx for the suggestion! I also renamed the function mapIndexed
    – Vivien
    Aug 10, 2019 at 8:38
  • 1
    It's a shame that dart does not have a built-in easy way to do this. Even 30 years old python can do this easily!
    – osamu
    Oct 22, 2019 at 6:14
  • It turns out that .asMap().forEach() is essentially the same as this - see my answer.
    – Timmmm
    Nov 21, 2019 at 14:32
  • 2
    @Timmmm I think asMap() will cost additional loop to retrieve data, thus it will not efficient as mapIndexed() above.
    – anticafe
    Jan 9, 2020 at 4:11
24

Building on @Hemanth Raj answer.

To convert it back you could do

List<String> _sample = ['a', 'b', 'c'];
_sample.asMap().values.toList(); 
//returns ['a', 'b', 'c'];

Or if you needed the index for a mapping function you could do this:

_sample
.asMap()
.map((index, str) => MapEntry(index, str + index.toString()))
.values
.toList();
// returns ['a0', 'b1', 'c2']
0
19

I initially thought ['one', 'two', 'three'].asMap().forEach((index, value) { ... }); would be really inefficient because it looks like it is converting the list to a map. Actually it isn't - the documentation says it creates an immutable view of the list. I double checked with the dart2js of this code:

void main() {
  final foo = ['one', 'two', 'three'];
  foo.asMap().forEach((idx, val) {
    print('$idx: $val');
  });
}

It generates lot of code! But the gist is this:

  main: function() {
    var foo = H.setRuntimeTypeInfo(["one", "two", "three"], ...);
    new H.ListMapView(foo, ...).forEach$1(0, new F.main_closure());
  },

  H.ListMapView.prototype = {
    forEach$1: function(_, f) {
      var t1, $length, t2, i;
      ...
      t1 = this._values;
      $length = t1.length;
      for (t2 = $length, i = 0; i < $length; ++i) {
        if (i >= t2)
          return H.ioore(t1, i);
        f.call$2(i, t1[i]);
        t2 = t1.length;
        if ($length !== t2)
          throw H.wrapException(P.ConcurrentModificationError$(t1));
      }
    },
    ...
  },

  F.main_closure.prototype = {
    call$2: function(idx, val) {
      ...
      H.printString("" + idx + ": " + H.S(val));
    },
    $signature: 1
  };

So it is smart enough to do the efficient thing! Pretty clever.

Of course you can also just use a normal for loop:

for (var index = 0; index < values.length; ++index) {
  final value = values[index];
1
  • Thanks for researching about this! I was wondering the same and because I was lazy to search, always stuck with the normal loop. Apr 12, 2021 at 18:58
16

Use asMap to convert List to map first. The index of element is the key. The element becomes value. Use entries to map the key and value to anything you want.

List rawList = ["a", "b", "c"];
List<String> argList = rawList.asMap().entries.map((e) => '${e.key}:${e.value}').toList();
print(argList);

Output:

[0:a, 1:b, 2:c]
1
  • 1
    The best answer! No extension required or any mucking around!
    – Csaba Toth
    Apr 2, 2021 at 8:57
10

Lukas Renggli's more package includes many useful tools including 'indexed' which does exactly what you want. From the docs:

indexed(['a', 'b'], offset: 1)
  .map((each) => '${each.index}: ${each.value}')
  .join(', ');

(You can ignore the offset argument unless you have a Smalltalk background :-).

10

use -> mapIndexed(index, Element) Function

to map each element and its index to a new value.

import 'package:collection/collection.dart';

and use the map index as follows

(List).mapIndexed<Widget>(
 (mapIndex, mapElement) => Positioned(
  left: mapIndex.toDouble() * 5,
  child: Card(
   color: Colors.blue,
    child: Image.network(
     '${mapElement.ImageURL}',
      height: 80,
      width: 80))))

Please Refer: https://pub.dev/documentation/collection/latest/collection/IterableExtension/mapIndexed.html

9

You can use the mapIndexed extension from the collections package:

import 'package:collection/collection.dart';

void main() {
  final nums = [1, 2, 3];
  final strs = nums.mapIndexed((index, element) => index.toString() + '_' + element.toString()).toList();

  print(strs); //  [0_1, 1_2, 2_3]
}
6
6

For convenience you can use this extension method.

extension CollectionUtil<T> on Iterable<T>  {

  Iterable<E> mapIndexed<E, T>(E Function(int index, T item) transform) sync* {
    var index = 0;

    for (final item in this) {
      yield transform(index, item as T);
      index++;
    }
  }
}
0
4

You can use Iterable.generate factory. The following code would map an Iterable using indexes and values.

extension IterableMapIndex<T> on Iterable<T> {
  Iterable<E> mapIndexed<E>(E f(int index, T t)) {
    return Iterable.generate(this.length, (index)=>f(index, elementAt(index)));
  }
}
0
3

Using dart collection package you can access various list extensions

one is mapIndexed:

Iterable<R> mapIndexed<R>(R Function(int, E) convert)

list of all iterable extensions

1
0

package:quiver includes an enumerate function that is similar to Python's enumerate function.

(Note that although package:quiver isn't from the Dart team, it is owned and maintained by Google, and many of its contributors are members of Google's Dart and Flutter teams.)

-1

You can create another variable to get index.

    int index = 0;

    array?.forEach((element) {
    
    // your code is here

    index++; // you should add this at end of the for loop
    });

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