3

I want to have a struct template, that is defined by particular values of its components passed to it during construction, such that different values would create different C++ data types, and thought non-type template parameters may be useful for that. Something like this (just a simple example to show the issue, the real struct will be more complex):

enum ElementType
{
    TYPE1,
    TYPE2
};

template<ElementType elementType, int size>
struct DataType
{
    DataType(ElementType et = elementType, int s = size):
        elementType_(et),
        size_(s)
    {
    }
    ElementType elementType_;
    int size_;
};

int main()
{
    auto d1 = DataType(ElementType::TYPE1, 1);
}

I try to build this with g++-8 -std=c++17 and it gives me the following error:

./main.cpp:23:42: error: class template argument deduction failed:
auto d1 = DataType(ElementType::TYPE1, 1);
                                      ^
../main.cpp:23:42: error: no matching function for call to     ‘DataType(ElementType, int)’
../main.cpp:12:2: note: candidate: ‘template<ElementType elementType, int size> DataType(ElementType, int)-> DataType<elementType, size>’
  DataType(ElementType et = elementType, int s = size):
  ^~~~~~~~
../main.cpp:12:2: note:   template argument deduction/substitution failed:
../main.cpp:23:42: note:   couldn't deduce template parameter ‘elementType’
  auto d1 = DataType(ElementType::TYPE1, 1);
                                      ^
../main.cpp:23:42: error: expression list treated as compound expression in functional cast [-fpermissive]
../main.cpp:23:42: warning: left operand of comma operator has no effect [-Wunused-value]

Note that I cannot use type template arguments, since the two types of the arguments are fixed (ElementType and int), but DataType(ElementType::TYPE1, 1) must be of different type than DataType(ElementType::TYPE1, 2) and DataType(ElementType::TYPE1, 1) must be different than DataType(ElementType::TYPE2, 1).

  • 1
    IIRC template deduction is for deduction of types, not for values. – Some programmer dude Feb 27 '19 at 7:51
  • @Someprogrammerdude You can write std::array a{1, 2, 3}; and the value template argument for array size is deduced. Via explicit deduction guides, but still deduced. Isn't it? – Daniel Langr Feb 27 '19 at 7:59
  • @DanielLangr That's because of the C++17 std::array deduction guide. The deduction wouldn't be possible without it. Perhaps that's a possible solution for the OP (unless the code can be simplified)? – Some programmer dude Feb 27 '19 at 8:28
  • 1
    @Someprogrammerdude That was my point. However, I don't think it would be a solution here, since it seems to be not possible to use a guide "function" parameter as a template argument: X(int n) -> X<n>;- this does not work. – Daniel Langr Feb 27 '19 at 8:38
4

You can define your template like this:

template<ElementType elementType, int size>
struct DataType
{
    const ElementType elementType_ = elementType;
    const int size_ = size;
};

And create an instance of it like this:

auto d1 = DataType<ElementType::TYPE1, 1>();

Demo

1

To make use of deduction the value you pass to the constructor needs to be a constant expression. Unfortunately values passed as parameter loose their constexpr properties. To prevent this behavior you can pass the values wrapped in types e.g. using std::integral_constant.

Exemplary usage:

#include <type_traits>

enum ElementType
{
    TYPE1,
    TYPE2
};

template<ElementType elementType, int size>
struct DataType
{
    DataType(std::integral_constant<ElementType, elementType>, std::integral_constant<int, size> ic):
        elementType_(elementType),
        size_(ic)
    {
    }
    ElementType elementType_;
    int size_;
};

int main()
{
    auto d1 = DataType(std::integral_constant<ElementType, TYPE1>{}, std::integral_constant<int, 1>{});
}

[live demo]

To make it more convenient to use you could wrap around integral const with constexpr suffix operators:

#include <type_traits>

enum ElementType
{
    TYPE1,
    TYPE2
};


template <class... Ts>
constexpr int ival(Ts... Vs) {
    char vals[sizeof...(Vs)] = {Vs...};
    int result = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof...(Vs); i++) {
        result *= 10;
        result += vals[i] - '0';
    }
    return result;
}

template <class T, class... Ts>
constexpr ElementType etval(T V, Ts... Vs) {
    if (V == '1')
       return TYPE1;
    if (V == '2')
       return TYPE2;
}

template <char... Vs>
std::integral_constant<int, ival(Vs...)> operator""_i() {
    return {};
}

template <char... Vs>
std::integral_constant<ElementType, etval(Vs...)> operator""_et() {
    return {};
}


template<ElementType elementType, int size>
struct DataType
{
    DataType(std::integral_constant<ElementType, elementType>, std::integral_constant<int, size> ic):
        elementType_(elementType),
        size_(ic)
    {
    }
    ElementType elementType_;
    int size_;
};

int main()
{
    auto d1 = DataType(1_et, 1_i);
}

[live demo]

  • Even if this works I don't see any benefit over passing the values directly as template parameters. It's only extra boilerplate and more typing? – super Feb 27 '19 at 9:01

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